Oldham Family History

OLDHAM, Isaac Private

OLDHAM, Isaac Private

Male Abt 1739 - 1821  (~ 82 years)

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  • Name OLDHAM, Isaac 
    Suffix Private 
    Born Abt 1739  Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Gender Male 
    Military 1777-1778  Valley Forge, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 

    • 1st Virginia Regt.
    DAR Centinniel Index<br>
1966<br>
Military Records
    DAR Centinniel Index
    1966
    Military Records

    Page 504
    Military 1777-1783  Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 

    • Pennsylvania Rangers, Capt Van Meter's Company. Non-commissioned officer and private
    Oldham, Isaac
    Oldham, Isaac
    Revolutionary War

    Rejection of Military Pay Claim
    Land 12 Jun 1809  Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died Apr 1821  Cambridge, Ohio Co, Virginia Or Wheeling, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Oldham, Isaac
    Oldham, Isaac
    Estate Settlement
    Notes 
    • Virginia Gazette
      December 05, 1777

      John Still, of the County of Gloucefter, and ISAAC OLDHAM,of the Ifle of Wright, are ordered to repair to Head Quarters immediate, or they will be deemed Deferters, and treated as Fuch.

      FRANCIS MENNIS, Lieut. 11th Virg. Regt.


      DAR # 50468 - Miss Elizabeth Alice Oldham born Brownsville, Ohio States Isaac was born 1726 (doesn't work with Marcia's dates). Was a non-commissioned officer and private in Capt. John Van Meter's Company of Pennsylvania Rangers, 1778-83. He died in Ohio County Virginia

      Marcia Rothman notes: There are other birth dates for Isaac recorded, 1726, 1729, and 1736. Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol VII, pg 377, Virkus: Isaac military service pvt, Capt John Van Meter Co of Pennsylvania Rangers 1778-1783, probably married twice; m 2d Sarah Anderson.

      Isaac Oldham, was born about 1729 to 1739. One account says he was born on the forks of the "Yaw." That reference is to the Youghiogeheny River, which runs through Westmoreland, Pennsylvania and could be confused with his son Isaac Jr.

      It was said he was from Plymouth Colony stock and his ancestors came from the time of the Mayflower. The book "History of Licking County" , in the account of John Oldham, a grandchildren of Isaac, says this of Isaac. " The Oldham family ori,land, and was established in this country in the sixteenth century. Two brothers, John and William Oldham, emigrated to America from Oldhamshire and settled on a Jersey plantation, where John was killed by the Indians. William, who settled in what is now New Jersey, was our subject's great-grandfather. The date of his arrival in America was 1634. Grandfather Oldham followed the trail of the soldiers of the Indian War and settled at West Alexandria, known generally in the early days as "Hard Scrabble."

      There are different references to Isaac's birth place. One said he came from Massachusetts to Westmoreland, Pennsylvania in the long ago, was raised in Westmoreland and moved to Ohio County Virginia in 1796. Another source says two or threeemnd and settled in South Carolina. They moved to Vermont and later settled in Lancaster County Pennsylvania. Isaac Sr. was born and married in Vermont and Isaac Jr was born in Bedford County Pennsylvania. Yet another says he came from New Jersey to Western Pennsylvania, then settled in Ohio County, Virginia with members of his family.

      Isaac's first spouse was Mary Younger, both of Manallin Meeting declare their intention of marriage on 11 Sept and 9 Nov 1762 at Wellington Meeting House. They married on 20 October 1762 in the Quaker Warrington Meeting House, York County Pd Mary McGrew were their witness and nearest relative.

      Isaac Oldham, of Menallin Meeting, hathe been so unstable as to be baptized or sprinkled with water 12-12-1767. He offers something which is not satisfactory, 5-7-1768. Isaac is then disowned on 1 November 1767 at Wellington Meeting House,.n in following, Mary Oldham, wife of Isaac, hath compiled with the form of water baptism, and justifies her conduct therein- disowned on 10 August 1768 at Wellington Meeting House, York, Pennsylvania.

      On 4 September 1768 at York, Pennsylvania it is record that Isaac "absconded to defraud his creditors" Evidence indicates that both went South to Virginia or Maryland and according to one source, Mary is buried in Frederick County, Virginia.

      Isaac's second spouse, our ancestor, was Sarah Anderson and they married in Bedford county Pennsylvania. I do not know much about Isaac's marriages. I hope to find more information in the future.

      All of Isaac and Sarah's fourteen children were born in Pennsylvania. Thomas, his second oldest son was said to be born on the banks of the Allegany River, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Isaac Jr, was born somewhere in Westmoreland County, Pennsanoughiogeheny River as I mention earlier) and Robert, in Claysville, Washington County Pennsylvania. Isaac Jr., Thomas, James and Robert later moved to Ohio.

      If Isaac was a Quaker, he was not true to his faith, as he participated in the Revolutionary War. He began military service in 1778 at Westmoreland, Pennsylvania and was an non-commissioned officer and then a private in Capt. John Vanmeteryls 4th Bn, Colonel Army, known as the Pennsylvania Rangers. His militia duties included "Running the boundary line between this state and Virginia" at Westmoreland, Pennsylvania. He ended military service on 14 June 1782.

      It has been said he made many trips by flat boats or Kentucky "Broadhorns," between 1783 and 1800. On one of these trips the convoy of boats was attacked by the savages, when some forty miles above Louisville. The first fire of the Indiansdfeats resembled a hail storm from the glancing balls. All the boats escaped, except Greathouse, which was captured, landed and destroyed, those on board taken captives from whom nothing was ever heard of them. On the arrival of the other boats at Louisville, a detachment of cavalry was sent in pursuit of the Indians, but without avail in 1783.

      He received pay of one pound, 11 shillings, 6 pence for his active duty in the Revolutionary War beginning 06 Jun 1782 to 14 Jun 1782 on 10 July 1784 at Westmoreland, Pennsylvania. He lived in 1795 at Rostraver, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania;dge

      He then followed the trail of the soldiers from the Indian War and settled in West Alexandria, known generally in the early days as "Hard Scrabble" which is about 12 miles east of Wheeling, in 1796. Another account says "Sometime after thedsder sons, settled in the Dallas area, which is now West Virginia."

      James Ross, Esq. of Pittsburgh and Ann his wife sold to Isaac Oldham of Ohio County, Virginia, four hundred acres on waters of Middle Wheeling Creek joining Walter Summers, for $400 on 22 June 1799 at Middle Wheeling Creek, Ohio, Virginia.

      Isaac was a witness to the will of Samuel Holmes on 15 August 1799 at Ohio, Virginia.

      Isaac Oldham and Sarah his wife sold to James Patterson of Westmorland County, Pennsylvania for two Hundred dollars, one hundred and niney six acres on waters of Wheeling Creek on 22 August 1801 at on the waters of Wheeling Creek, Ohio, Virgi


      Isaac entered into an agreement with William Anderson concerning William's mother Catherine Anderson on 10 June 1802 at Washington, Pennsylvania.

      Isaac Oldham and Sarah his wife sold to James Oldham for the sum of fifty dollars a tract of land containing ninety eight acres on Middle Island Creek on 1 September 1804 at Middle Wheeling Creek, Ohio, Virginia.

      Isaac then issued charges against William Anderson for breaking the agreement they had made concerning William's mother Catherine Anderson on 5 December 1804 at Washington, Pennsylvania.

      William Anderson, late of Washington County, Pennsylvania, was summoned to answer Isaac Oldham of a plea that he hold to him the covenants and agreements between them made according to the ____ _____ and effect of a certain deed thereof madee
      id William and not performed __ ___ had whereupon the said Isaac by James Ross his attorney sawth that whereas the said William and Isaac by their deed with each of their seals sealed at the county fore-said and bearing the date the 10 June 1802 did enter into covenants of agreement with each other as follows to writ_______first the said William Anderson is to deliver up all of his mothers clothing, both wearing apparel and all others provided his mother should be fit to return to William Anderson; said William doth agree to carefully attend and maintain her which she thinks proper to sends with him, like wise said William to give her his mother her wheel (?) and by the said deed and ________said Isaac did consent covenant and agree with said William that he the Said Isaac whole said Catherine Anderson, mother of said William, doth her proper to reside with said Isaac that he the said Isaac would carefully keep and attend her a cause it to be done and it said Catherine should see proper to remove from said Isaac said Isaac did agree to give up all and surrender the property of her; that is then in proportion.
      And the said Isaac saith that the said William hath broken his covenants so made as aforesaid with he said Isaac in this that he did not deliver up to his said mother when she chose to return and did return to the house of the said Isaac allgroperty by detained and withhold the same and when his said mother was desiring to return and live with him the said William and reside with him he did utterly refuse to retrieve and admit her into his house by reason of which ________s he was compelled to return to the house of the said Isaac and _______ with him to wit on the first day of Jan 1803 at the County as foresaid and state doth remain and made at the house of the said Isaac and is maintained at his costs and expenses without any aid or contribution from the said William.
      Whereupon the said Isaac saith that the said William hath not kept his covenant and agreement so made with him as foresaid by hath broken the fame and all the other ______hath ______and stole________to keep or ___ ___the fame to his damagesl money of Pennsylvania and _________and he brings here into court the contents foresaid sealed with the _____of said william and Isaac as foresaid and dated as above set forth which fully testify the covenants and agreements by the said William with the said Isaac as above mentioned in February 1805 at Washington, Pennsylvania.

      List of Causes Set down for Trial at July Term, 1810 Beginning on the 4th Monday, of July (News Article)
      Date: 1810-05-21; Paper: Washington Reporter

      Isaac Oldham V. Wm Anderson

      He appeared on the census of 1810 at Ohio, Virginia; and stated his age was 45 and upwards.

      He appeared on the census of 1820 at Ohio, Virginia; and stated his age was 45 and upwards.
      Isaac died after April 1821 and before September 1821 The following is his will he left.

      In the name of God Amen I Isaac Oldham of the County of Ohio and Commonwealth of Virginia being weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks to God, calling to Mind the Mortality of my body that it is appointed to all men to die do make and ordain this my last will and testament that is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul in to the hands of Almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial, and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in these life I give demise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

      First I give and bequeath to my dearly beloved wife Sarah a full and complete maintenance victualing and clothing out of my plantation also bed and bedding sufficient with the use of dresser and house hold furniture and also a horse suitable for her to ride when she may think proper and the full use and possession of my present dwelling house during life,

      Also I give and bequeath to my son William Oldham the sum of one dollar, My daughter Sarah one dollar, my son John one dollar, also to my son James the sum of one dollar, in addition to what they have previously received, to my son Robert Oldham I give and bequeath the sum of one hundred dollars as follows Viz twenty dollars immediately after my decease and twenty dollars yearly till the whole is paid, I do also give convey and bequeath to my son Samuel Oldham to his proper use and behoof to him and his Heirs forever my plantation to possess immediately after my decease on condition of paying out of said estate or of his own all the above mentioned sums and securing to and providing for my widow his Mother all the above mentioned privileges and accommodations and in addition to the aforementioned to keep a constant supply of wood made ready for her with suitable attendance if infirm or indisposed and decent burial after death, said Samuel Oldham is to hold all the moveable property to me belonging not reserved to his mother during her life by having the same appraised by Judicious persons as also that to be possessed by his Mother all of which be shall be accountable for and bring to sale at her death and pay the amount to my sons Thomas and Isaac and my daughters Catherine, Mary, Esther, Alley, Elizabeth and Hannah to each an equal sum.

      I do here by make appoint and ordain my wife Sarah executrix and my son Samuel Oldham executor of this my last will and testament to execute and conduct all things concerning my estate as before directed and do hereby renounce disallow of and disannul all former wills and bequests as witness my hand and seal this 23rd day of April A.D. 1821

      Isaac Oldham (his mark)

      Signed sealed and acknowledged in the presence of us John Bushfield John Maffet Elizabeth Maffet

      Isaac's will was proved in Court at September Term 1821. By November 1, 1821 Isaac Oldham's property had been appraised. Here is account of what our fourth great grandfather had in his household back in 1821.

      4 Hogs, 1 mare, 2 calves, 1 brindle cow, 1 red cow, 11 geese, 9 sheep, iron and boxes of one old wagon, 1 double tree and hangings, 1 sled, 15 Harrow teeth and one log chain, 1 plow, 1 plow and clevis, 2 Iron pitch forks, 3 guns and riddle,g bx and knife, 1 gun, 1 ax and hoe and one hand saw, a quantity of wheat by the bushel, a quantity of rye by the bushel, 1 grind stone, 1 mattoc and one hoe together with other articles, 2 bags and one packsaddle, 1 iron dung fork, 2 cider barrels,2 pair of chanes, 2 collars, 2 blind bridles, 1 kettle, 1 bake oven, 1 big wheel and 2 old saddles, 1 tub, 1 tea kettle, 1 churn, 1 bucket and dresser furniture, 2 chairs, 1 table, one lantern, 1 wheel and one spinning wheel, 1 bedstead, bed and bedding, 1 wire sieve, 1 looking glass, 1 candle stand and 2 bags, 1 case of drawers, 1 fur shovel, tongs, 2 hand irons, 2 crooks, 1 loom and tackling, 10 pounds wool, 1 apple mill, and a quantity of flax.

      Bibliography +?, Memorial Record of Licking County Ohio (Chicago: Record Publishing Company, 1894). +Closson, Bob and Mary,
      Abstracts of Washington County Pennsylvania +Willbooks 1-5 (1776- 1841) (1935 Sampson Drive, Apollo, Pennsylvania 1561 3-9209: +Clossen Press, 1995). +
      Copy of certificate #3059; the active duty and militia pay to Isaac Oldham from Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1782 - 1785. +Court record of trial of Isaac Oldham vs. William Anderson, number 8 of Feb Term 1805; with court docket page, Feb 1805, Prothonotary, Washington County Courthouse,, Washington,, Pennsylvania, 15301. +
      Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR, Lineage Book in ?, ? (?; ?: ?, ?). +Early Tax lists of Westmoreland County Pennsylvania, Seattle Public Library, Seattle, King, Washington. +Guernsey County, Ohio 1825 tax List, Vertical file, Seattle Public Librar y, Seattle, King, Washington. +Hill, History of Licking County, Ohio (n.p.: n. pub., 1881). +International Genealogy Index, n.d., LDS Family History Center, Everett, Snohomish, Washington. +Internet Electronic Mail, 1990's. +Jack T Ericson, "Cornplanter Descendants Association Newsletter," serial Unknown. +Letter from Audra Wayne, 268 Willow Lane, Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 of the Wheeling Genealogical Society, August 10, 1991. +Lewis, Thomas W, History of Zanesville (n.p.: n. pub., 1927). +Miller, William Harris, The History and Genealogies of the Miller , Woods ,
      Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh and Brown (Lexington, Kentuck y:
      Press of Translylvania, 1907). +Oldham Family Group Sheet sent to Marcia J Rothman by Darlene Libbey +Oldham Family Record, sent to Marcia Rothman by Lilly Moorehead of
      Cambridge, Ohio, ?. +Pioneer Cemetery Of Guernsey County, Ohio, n.d., Seattle Public Library, Seattle, King, Washington. +Probate of Isaac Oldham, Sr, Ohio County, West Virginia, November 1, 1821 . +Roots and Branches, "Root and Branches," iltailed
      citations. +Schenck, J.S., History of Warren County, Pennsylvania (Syracerse, New Yor k: D.
      Mason and County, 1887). +The Old Grave Yard in Cambridge +Burial Records of Founders Cemetery Cambridge, Ohio, abt 1970. +Transcription of the Original Records of the Western Missionary Society
      Under the Direction of Rev. Baius Jackson Slosser, PH.D.F.R. Hist.S.
      Professor of Ecclesiastical History and History of Doctrine Western
      Theological Seminary, 15 April 1936. +United States Federal Census. +Wallace, Anthony C., The Renaissance of the Iroquois (n.p.: n. pub., n.d. ). +Warren County Historical Society, "Stepping Stones," serial unknown. +Wheeling Genealogical S,/aayne, 268 Williow Ln
      Wheeling, West Virginia 26003, 1991. +Will of Isaac Oldham, Ohio County, Virginia, Sept 1821. +Will of Samuel Oldham Sr. of Ohio County, West Virginia, will book 5, pag e
      248, 25 Jan 1876. +Will of William Buchannon, Ohio County, Virginia, book 4 page 70, 21 June
      1822. +William G. Wolfe, Stories of Guernsey County, Ohio; History of an Average
      Ohio County (Cambridge, Ohio: William G. Wolfe, 1943). +Wlliams, T.F., Home Guide and Instructor with Biographies; History of
      Guernsey County, Ohio (Cleveland, Ohio: T.F. Williams, 1882). +__________, Pennsylvania Archives (n.p.: n. pub., n.d.).

      ************************************
      Bob Kay Notes: He married Mary Younger in Menallin Township, York County, Pennsylvania. In 1768, they left the area. Probably by request. Following are a couple of excerpts from the Warrington Monthly Meeting journal:
      "Isaac Oldham of Menallin Meeting 1-10-1767, hath been so unstable as to be baptized or sprinkled with water 12-12-1767. He offers something which is not satisfactory, 5-7-1768. He is disowned".

      Mary got kicked out, too! Following is her banishment notice " Mary Oldham, wife of Isaac, hath complied with the form of water baptism, and justifies her conduct therein - disowned 10-18-1768". It appears that baptism and sps. Wted this need for cleansing and flight is a note that Isaac "absconded to defraud his creditors, 4-9-1768. Evidence indicates that both went South to Virginia or Maryland. Mary Younger Oldham is buried in Frederick County, Virginia.

      Ref. Miller. Histories and Genealogies, page 573

      the DAR File of #92870, Barbara McCartney Langdon shows the children of Isaac's First Marriage to be:

      William b. 1753 m. Penelope Pope
      John b. 1755 m. Ann Rice
      Sarah b. 1757 m. William Meriweather

      children of Second Marriage to Sarah Anderson:
      James b. 1774 m. Nancy Brown m2nd Mary Buchanan
      Thomas b. 1776 m. Nancy Davis
      Isaac b. 1779 m. Sarah Marling
      Catherine b. 1780 m 2Samuel Arbuthnot m2 James Smith
      Mary b. ? m. James Stewart
      Robert b. 1787 m. 1 Martha Morrison m2 Jean Risher
      Esther b. 1789 m. John Marling
      Allie b. 1790 m. John Bushfield
      Elizabeth b. ? m. John Moffatt
      Hannah b. ? m. William Cummins
      Samuel b. 1792 m. Rebecca Wylie

      Marcia Rothman: I am looking for the parents of Sarah Anderson who was born about 1750 or so possabley in Bedford, York or Lancaster County Pennsylavania. It has been said that SARAH ANDERSON was a sister to Col. William Anderson who settled in Washington Co Pennsylvania. Col William Anderson was said to had been in the Revolution war. Sarah's other brother was Mr. C. Anderson, a Magistrate of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

      A Chuck Anderson and Isaac Baker, two justices of Allegheny Co, Pennsylvan ia with a land deed to Isaac Oldham from James and Ann Ross on 22 June 1799, who had it from James Martin on Jan 12, 1784 who had it from the state of Virginia, 400 acres of land on Middle Wheeling Creek, Ohio Co, Virginia

      Sarah Anderson married ISAAC OLDHAM ,SR, son of William OLDHAM and Sarah Dicks/DIX, circa 1773 at Bedford, Pennsylvania. She died after 1824 at Ohio, Virginia; was alive to finalize Isaac'sprobate.
      Isaac and Sarah's children
      i. James Oldham.
      ii. Thomas Oldham.
      iii. ISAAC ,JR OLDHAM.
      iv. Catharine Oldham.
      v. Robert Oldham.
      vi. Mary Oldham was born about 1785.
      vii. Esther Oldham.
      viii. Alice Alley Oldham.
      ix. SAMUEL OLDHAM.
      x. Hannah Oldham.
      xi. Elizabeth Oldham was born about 1796.



      URL (Click on link) http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-
      Grant Title Robinson, John.
      Publication 12 June 1809.
      Other Format Available on microfilm.
      Virginia State Land Office. Grants A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-190;
      Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , ree ls 369-. Related
      See also the following surname(s): Robbinson, Robertson, Robiso n. Note Location: Ohio County.
      Description: 24 1/4 acres on Middle Wheeling Creek adjoining William Bu chanan, Isaac Oldham &c.
      Source: Land Office Grants No. 58, 1809, p. 138 (Reel 124).
      Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virgin ia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Libra ry of Virginia. Subject - Personal Robinson, John. grantee.
      Buchanan, William.
      Oldham, Isaac.

      *********

      Revolution & "Logan's Massacre"- 7Great Grandfather, Isaac Oldham
      Thomas Atkinsadded this on 14 Oct 2008


      Issac Oldham and his first wife were the parents of Elizabeth Oldham [abt. 1760-aft.1830]. We know this from Issac?s will and a 1903 letter written by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood [1838-1926] stating that her mother was descended from Col. Oldham of the Revolution.

      Issac Oldham was born probably in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1726. There is a published book that gives a lot of information, much of it contradictory, about Issac's life and ancestry. The book is History of the Families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh, and Brown, by W.H. Miller, 1907, Richmond, KY, pp.549-573. He was the father of Elizabeth Oldham Cooper, the wife of Nathan Cooper.

      A great granddaughter states in the book that Issac came from New Jersey to Western Pennsylvania to Ohio County, Virginia (WV). She states that his first wife died in Frederick County, Virginia, when the family lived there. The residence in Frederick County rings true because it would have given Elizabeth the opportunity to meet Nathan Cooper, whose family lived there.

      The second wife was Sarah Anderson, reputedly married to Issac in Bedford County, Pennsylvania. The book states that Elizabeth Oldham (Cooper) was the daughter of the second Mrs. Oldham, but this cannot be: Elizabeth was born in the 1750's; Sarah Anderson Oldham's youngest child was born in 1792--she could not have given birth to children some thirty-five years apart. Sarah was the sister of Colonel William Anderson of Washington County, Pennsylvania, where the Nathan Coopers lived in 1790. Another brother was Mr. C. Anderson, a magistrate in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

      Issac's will lists the following children: Issac, Junior, who married Sarah Marling of Harpers Ferry, VA, and settled in Ohio; James Oldham, who lived in the early 1800's near Nathan and Elizabeth Cooper on Middle Island Creek in what later became Tyler County, WV, and who, according to the book, settled in Ohio; John Oldham, who settled in KY; Robert Oldham, who married (1) Martha Morrison (2) Jean Risner; Thomas Oldham; Mary Oldham; Catherine Oldham; Esther Oldham; Alline "Alley" Oldham, for whom Nathan and Elizabeth named their daughter; Elizabeth Oldham Cooper, the mother of Isaiah Cooper (1778-1849); Hannah Oldham; Sarah Oldham, who married William Merriwether and settled in Kentucky; Samuel Oldham, who married Rebecca Wylie; and William Oldham. (He was not the William Oldham for whom Oldham County, Kentucky, was named.) (The will did not list the married names for the daughters.)

      One of the accounts in the Miller book states that Winifred Oldham Neville, wife of John Neville, who led the federal attempt to collect the tax on whiskey that provoked the Whiskey Rebellion, was Issac Oldham's sister. Whether she was or not, it is interesting that after the rebels burned their home, the Nevilles settled on Montour Island, an island in the Ohio River about eight or ten miles downstream from Pittsburgh. The island, now called Neville Island, was formerly the home of Andrew Montour and his son John Montour (aka Montier). John Montour was the father of Elizabeth Montier Cooper, the wife of Isaiah Cooper (1778-1849). Today, across the Ohio from Neville Island, are Montour Run (a creek), Montour Heights, etc.

      In the Revolution, Issac served as an officer in John Van Meter's Company of Pennsylvania Rangers 1778-1783. [Vol.23 pp228-319, Pennsylvania Archives] DAR has records of his service. He would have been in his fifties at the time of his service, but he was obviously a vigorous man in his fifties, because he lived to be ninety-five.

      The Miller book says that Issac made many trips by flatboat down the Ohio River between 1783 and 1800. On one of these trips, the convoy of boats he was in was attacked by Indians forty miles upstream from Louisville. The first shots by the Indians landed their charge upon the arched roofs of the boats like hailstones. All of the boats except one escaped. The Greathouse was captured, landed, and destroyed. Those on board were taken captive and never heard from again. A detachment of cavalry was sent out from Louisville, but they never found the captives. Issac Oldham's involvement on the sidelines of the grisly end of a grisly piece of American history. Let us begin in 1774 when the Shawnees and other western tribes were skirmishing with whites on the frontier. At that time the Indian Tagajootee, known as "Logan" to the whites, like his father, was on extremely friendly terms with the whites. His father Shikelamy, had earlier been the Iroquois spokesman at Shamokin, the "Iroquois agency" for the whites in Pennsylvania. Madame Montour had been Shikelamy's interpreter, stationed at Shamokin, when Logan was a boy. But Logan was now a grown man with no family left but his father and the family of his sister. He came home one day to find his entire family murdered. It had been Jake Greathouse and his ruffian friends who had massacred Logan's family, but Logan did not find that out for a long time. Meanwhile Logan vowed to kill ten white persons for every member of his family that was killed and set about achieving that end. The Shawnees took to the warpath with him as did other tribes of the Ohio Valley. It set off what was called "Lord Dunmore's War," Dunmore being the royal governor of Virginia. It embroiled the frontier, many of our family serving in that war, among them Nathan Cooper, John Montour, John Cowan I, and the Major Russell, friend of the Cowan family, who had recently lost his teenage son at the same time as Daniel Boone lost his son James near Cumberland Gap in western Virginia. Boone stayed behind in Virginia to command the fort of his partner in grief, Major William Russell.

      The war ended at the Battle of Point Pleasant where the Great Kanawha River joins the Ohio in West Virginia. Cornstalk and other chiefs surrendered. Present at this battle were our ancestors Nathan Cooper, Samuel Cowan, and John Montour as well as other family members. Logan refused to surrender, mistrusting the whites, as Cornstalk should have. [He and his son were murdered by white soldiers while in voluntary captivity as hostages.] Instead Logan sent this poignant letter to Col. Andrew Lewis, the commander of the Virginians:

      I appeal to any white man to say if he ever entered Logan's cabin hungry and he gave him not meat; if he ever came cold and naked and he clothed him not. Logan remained quiet in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites that my countrymen, as they passed said, "Logan is the friend of white Men." I had even thought to live with you, but for the injuries of one man...who the last spring, in cold blood and unprovoked, murdered all the relations of Logan, not even sparing women and children.

      There runs not a drop of my blood in any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life.

      Who is there to mourn for Logan? Not one.

      Logan turned to alcohol and died a bitter alcoholic. Had he survived twenty years, he would have lived to see his family avenged. It was in this portion of the story that Issac Oldham, our ancestor, comes in. Because the Indians of the Ohio Valley attacked whites who ventured down the Ohio River in the 1790's, they arranged to travel in flotillas. Issac was in such a flotilla about forty miles above Louisville when the Indians attacked. All boats, including Oldham's, managed to escape from the Indians except one, the Greathouse, named for its owner, Jake Greathouse, who was aboard with his wife. The Indians boarded the Greathouse, taking all on board prisoners. None was ever heard from again. But the story passed down the Ohio Valley that the Indians had recognized the archvillain and saved him and his wife for special torture. It was said that they stripped them naked and beat them repeatedly between the neck and the knees until all was raw. Then they slit their bellies and severed their small intestines, tying the end to saplings. Then they forced them to walk round and round as their intestines wound around the tree. When their abdomens were empty, hot coals were thrown into the cavity before the Indians finally tomahawked them to death. This was the world our ancestors lived in.[Thom, p.515] After the Battle of Fallen Timbers, General Anthony Wayne was able to conclude the Treaty of Greenville in 1795, which stopped the menace to travel on the Ohio.

      Although there is some evidence that the Oldhams were in the Ohio Valley earlier, on June 22, 1799, James Ross of Pittsburgh and his wife Ann sold to Issac Oldham of Ohio County, VA (WV) 400 acres on Middle Wheeling Creek for $400. (Deed Book 4 Page 326). On September 1, 1804, Issac and Sarah sold to James Oldham for $150, ninety-eight acres on Middle Island Creek, where Nathan and Elizabeth Cooper were living. Had Issac and Sarah lived on Middle Island Creek before purchasing the land on Middle Wheeling Creek? On February 2, 1807, James Oldham sold 300 acres, it being a part of the 400 acres originally sold to Issac Oldham. Apparently Issac "retired" by selling off a hunk of his farm to his son, who in turn sold it again.

      The closest town to Issac and Sarah Oldham's farm was West Alexander, Washington County, Pennsylvania. That is how near, if not on, the West Virginia-Pennsylvania state line the Oldhams lived. The West Alexander Cemetery has tombstones for Samuel Oldham, born March 1, 1792-died March 10, 1876 and for Samuel's wife, Rebecca. Samuel was Issac's son who inherited the 100 acres containing the Oldham home. Issac and Sarah are probably buried at or near West Alexander, but their graves are not marked. Much discussion in the Miller book is given to the Oldhams' time lived in Berkeley County, VA (now WV). Jefferson County was formed from Berkeley County in 1801. It was there that the Mathenys lived and, just up the Shenandoah River, the Coopers.
    Person ID I9749  oldham
    Last Modified 2 Nov 2014 

    Father OLDHAM, William,   b. Abt 1710, East St. Clair Twp., Beford County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1749, Philadelphia, Philadelphia City, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Mother DIX, Sarah Dicks,   b. Aft 1712, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1777, Nottingham, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 64 years) 
    Family ID F4350  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 YOUNGER, Mary,   d. Bef 1773, Greenbriar County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 20 Oct 1762  Warrington, Menallen Twp., York County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, William,   b. Abt 1763,   d. Aft 1821  (Age ~ 59 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Sarah,   b. Abt 1764, York County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1841  (Age ~ 77 years)
     3. OLDHAM, John,   b. Abt 1766,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F4354  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 ANDERSON, Sarah,   b. Abt 1750,   d. Aft 1821, Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Married Aft 1773  Bedford County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 12
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, James,   b. 1774, Bedford, Bedford County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1835  (Age 61 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Thomas,   b. 1777, Banks Of The Alleghany River, Pitts, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 May 1864, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
     3. OLDHAM, Isaac,   b. 8 Nov 1779, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Sep 1851, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     4. OLDHAM, Catharine,   b. Abt 1781,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. OLDHAM, Robert,   b. 29 Nov 1783, Claysville, Washington County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Sep 1849, Delaware County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     6. OLDHAM, Mary,   b. Abt 1785, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. OLDHAM, Esther,   b. 19 Nov 1788, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1865, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     8. OLDHAM, Alice Allene Alley,   b. 29 Dec 1790, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1852, Alexandria, Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
     9. OLDHAM, Samuel,   b. 1 Mar 1792, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Mar 1876, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     10. OLDHAM, Hannah,   b. Abt 1794,   d. Yes, date unknown
     11. OLDHAM, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1796, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F4355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1739 - Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Oct 1762 - Warrington, Menallen Twp., York County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Aft 1773 - Bedford County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - 1777-1778 - Valley Forge, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - 1777-1783 - Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 12 Jun 1809 - Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Apr 1821 - Cambridge, Ohio Co, Virginia Or Wheeling, West Virginia Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War<br>
Grave Marker
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War
    Grave Marker


    Research
    Oldham, Samuel Marling
    Oldham, Samuel Marling
    Jeanne Heuman Email

  • Sources 
    1. [S1224] Pat Searight.

    2. [S1476] Marcia Rothman, mjrothman@comcast.net.

    3. [S1819] DAR Lineage, Book 49, pg 121; bk 51, pg 213; bk 65 pg 146; bk 67 pg 306 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S424] Dr. James Scott McOwen.

    5. [S164] Ohio County, Virginia Will Book 2, Page 192 (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S166] Ohio County, Virginia Probate Book 3, Page 167 & 294 (Reliability: 3).

    7. [S167] Ohio County, Virginia Settlement Book 3, Page 167 (Reliability: 3).

    8. [S2067] Will of Isaac Oldham.

    9. [S2577] IGI, International Genealogical Index / North America.

    10. [S3232] West Virginia Estate Settlements.

    11. [S364] Histories and Genealogies of the Families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh and Brown, Wm. Miller, (http://www.archive.org/details/historygenealogie00mill), Page 573 (Reliability: 3).

    12. [S208] Histories and Genealogies of the Families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh and Brown, 1904, Wm. Miller, (http://www.archive.org/details/historygenealogie00mill), Pg 555 (Reliability: 3).