Oldham Family History

OLDHAM,  Colonel William H.

OLDHAM, Colonel William H.

Male 1753 - 1791  (38 years)

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  • Name OLDHAM, William H. 
    Prefix Colonel 
    Born 17 Jun 1753  Berkeley, Albemarle County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Military 1777-1778  Valley Forge, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 1783  Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Land 13 Feb 1789  Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Land 8 Oct 1790  Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Will 13 Sep 1791  Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    States Jefferson County, State of Virginia 
    Oldham, Capt. William
    Oldham, Capt. William
    Will Documents
    Military 4 Nov 1791 
    Died 4 Nov 1791  St. Clair's Defeat, Recovery, Mercer County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    Oldham, Colonel William H.
    Oldham, Colonel William H.
    Death Notice
    Oldham, Col. William H.
    Oldham, Col. William H.
    Daily Advertiser. St. Clair 1745 Apr 05
    Buried 8 Nov 1791  Samuel Oldham Burial Ground, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Land 3 Aug 1792  Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Notes 
    • Genealogical Abstracts from 18th-Century Virginia Newspapers. Robert K. Headley, Jr., comp. (1987).

      Killed by Indians in Ky. on 4 Nov 1791; Gen. BUTLER, Col. OLDHAM, Majors BROWN, HART, CLARK, FERGUSON, Capts. BRADFORD, TIPTON, SMITH, PURDIE, NEWMAN, PHELAN (also give as PHILON), KIRKWOOD, PEATE (also given as PRATT), PRICE, SWEARENGEN, CUBBS (also given as CRIBBS), GUTHRIE (also given as GUTHRIE). Lts. WARREN, SPIER (also given as SPEER), LICKENS (also given as LUKINS), M'NICKLE, M'MATH, HOPPER, RIED(also given as REED), KELSO, BOYD, Ensigns BEALLY(also given as BEATTY), COBBS, BROOKS, BALSH(also given as BALCH), CHASE(also given as CHAFE), TURNER, PURDIE, Quartermasters WARD, REYNOLDS(also given as REYNOLD), SAMPLE, Adjutants ANDERSON, BURGESS, Dr. GRAYSON; all were members of a force under Gen. ST. CLAIR which was attacked by Indians 15 miles from the Maume Village (KG 12 Nov 91, VGGA 7 Dec 91, NPC 10 Dec 91)

      Major Abraham Kirkpatrick & His Descendents, Kirk Q. Bigham:
      Lt. Col. William Oldham's family bible states that he was born June 17, 1753, and was killed at St. Clair's defeat Nov 4, 1791. He married July 24, 1783, Penelope, Daughter of Col Wm. Pope of Jefferson County, Virginia, now Kentucky aftesth his widow and daughter married two brothers, Harry and Samuel Churchill, both long since dead.

      Will of Col. William Oldham: Will Book 1, pg 29, Louisville, Kentucky. dated 6 Sep 1791, probated 5 Dec 1791 "I leave to my wife Penelope, the tract of land on Chenowith Run, and negro man, Bosen, with household furniture and one half part of all my stock forever, also during her widowhood I leave to her Gilbert and Violet. The residue of my estate, both real and personal. I bequeath with the two negroes I leave my wife Penelope,during her widowhood, to be equally divided between my four children, John, Richard, Abigail and William Oldham, excepting a portion of 400 acres near Bullitt's Lick, to Elizabeth Homes the 400 acres pre-emption near Bullitt's Lick., Appoint Richard C. Anderson, Richard Taylor and Jacob Funk, gents. executors witnessed by Pearce.

      Draper Manuscripts, Wisconsin State Historical Society, Vol 37 J, Page 114 -
      Four letters from Judge John Pope Oldham, dated 1845 to 1847, in which he states that his father, Lt. Col. William Oldham "Was born in 1752 in Berkeley County, Virginia. His parents were farmers in middle circumstances."

      "Besides William, they raised two sons and four daughters. Samuel, the eldest, removed to Kentucky in 1784, settled near Louisville, and died at an advanced age" (died 1823). "Conway the youngest, entered the Revolutionary Army in 1776fw Springs, where he fell, having then, I believe, the rank of major."

      "The two eldest daughters removed early to Pittsburgh, one as the wife of General John Neville, and the other as the wife of Major Abraham Kirkpatrick."

      "Another married Lawrence Ross (who for many years of his youth had been a captive with the Indians), removed to the neighborhood of Louisville at an early day, raised a large family and died in affluence at an advanced age. The other remaginia until her death."

      "William joined Daniel Morgan's regiment as an ensign in 1776, marched to Boston, etc." was in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth, was actively engaged in both battles and near being taken prisoner in the former. "He resigned his commnf 1779, having then the rank of captain, and came directly to Louisville, Kentucky,"

      "In 1791 was appointed to command the Kentucky troops."

      "My knowledge of the facts, I have stated, was derived from my mother and others intimately acquainted with my father. I think there can be no question as to their accuracy."

      C.V.Jackson research notes 1972: born 1753 / 1791 Col. Wm10 killed at S t. Clair's defeat, Kentucky

      R.C. Ballard Thurston 1899 notes: was a young man at the outbreak of the Revolution, serving as first lieutenant in Nelson's Independent Pennsylvania Rifle Company from Jan 30, 1776 to Jan 1777. The Jefferson County Virginia (now Kentucky) Minute book contains the following references to him (lists 15 entries) Judge Thomas Peek Genealogy written 1891 - states William and Penelope had only three children, not four

      Oldham, William (Pa). 1st Lieutenant of Nelson's Independent Rifle Company, 30th January. 1776; Captain, 15th December, 1776; transferred to 5th Pennsylvania, 24th March, 1777; resigned 9th January, 1779; Lieutenant-Colonel Kentucky Militia;dt. Clair's Defeat, near Fort Recovery, Ohio, 4th November, 1791.

      History & Families Oldham County, Kentucky: The First Century, 1824-1924
      By Oldham County Historical Society
      Page 19

      HOW THE COUNTY WAS NAMED

      As was the custom during the formation of the new state of Kentucky, counties were often named in honor of persons of valor and courage. Such was the case for the naming of Oldham County. The name "Oldham" is Anglo-Saxon in origin and means "old Home", the Anglo-Saxon for "Home" being "Hame", the "e" being dropped in the course of time. (Quotation from Professor Patterson, former President of the Agricultural College at Lexington, KY).

      Colonel William Oldham, for whom the county was name, had roots beginning in England. His ancestors came to America in March, 1635, and were among the first settlers in Westmoreland County, VA. From the union of John Oldham and Anne Conway, who were residing in Berkley County, VA, came eight children. According to the family Bible, two of these children, Samuel, born 1749, and William, born 1753, eventually migrated to Kentucky. Samuel was the first to arrive in Kentucky, and young William entered the Revolutionary service and made captain. He served in the Continental forces until his departure for the Falls of the Ohio in the spring of 1784.

      We find both brothers were very active in Louisville politics in those early days. Samuel took the office of Magistrate Aug 7, 1880 (sic), and appeared as security for his brother William, who had been appointed Sheriff Sept 2, 1786.

      William and his bride Penelope Pope, whom he had met on his way to Kentucky, were the proud parents of four children. John was born in 1785, Richard was born two years later, Abigail was born in 1789 and William in 1791. At the time of their marriage, Penelope was 14 years of age.

      Lieutenant Colonel William Oldham lost his life in the same year as the birth of his last child. Possibly because of his military experience, he was required to command the Kentucky Militia as it joined the ill-fated expedition which left Fort Hamilton, 25 miles north of Cincinnati, on Nov 4, 1791. The command was under Major general Arthur St. Clair. The state of Kentucky had been asked to supply 1,000 or the 2,000 men who made up the original expedition.

      Signs of the constant presence of the Indians became increasingly evident as the Militia slowly moved northward. We must assume that the size of the Indian band was underestimated by the officers, who were not well prepared for the battle. When they did realize the size of the Indian band, it was too late. The troops were overwhelmed by a surprise attack. This massacre was later referred to as "St. Clair's Defeat". A total of 630 men lost their lives, one of those was William Oldham.

      All that was left to be sent home to Penelope was Colonel William Oldham's watch and chain. We must assume that since no grave has been found, his remains, like those of many soldiers of that period, fell victim to varmints. Colonel Oldham must have had a premonition about his fate, because he had left this will:

      Oldham, William ..........Sept 13, 1791-Dec 6, 1791
      To wife Penelope tract of land on Chenoweth Run, house, furniture and third of stock forever, certain Negroes and residue of estate during widowhood, this to be divided equally between children John, Richard, Abigail, and William Oldham, except pre-emption of 400 acres near Bullitt's Lick, to Elizabeth Homes the 400 acres pre-emption near Bullitt's Lick.

      Executors: Richard C. Anderson, Richard Taylor, Jaob Funk
      Witnesses: George Pearce

      Kentuckians wanted no part of this battle in the first place, and they were bitter over the defeat and the loss of so many Kentucky lives. Colonel William Oldham was referred to in "Collins' History of Kentucky" as "a chivalrous and enterprising man, a brave and experienced officer." This high opinion of William Oldham led to naming the new county in honor of his memory.

      His brother Samuel O ldham lived to the ripe old age of 74. Samuel was married first to Jane Cunningham, and secondly to Ann Liscomb. His marriage to Ann produced a son named Conway, who married Francis Ross. Descendants of Samuel can be found residing in Oldham County today. Upon his death in 1823, he was buried on his property which we now know as the Kentucky State Fairgrounds.

      References:
      Genealogy records of Mary Bruce Oldham Caldwell
      Jefferson County Wills 1784-1813 Book, Page 29
      Historical Sketches of Kentucky,m Collins, 1847
      Writing of Elsie Herman Oldham County Historical Society
      History of the Oldham Family after They Came to America, written by Callie Oldham Robertson, research and editing by Harriet Virginia Oldham Hill.

      The Kentucky Encyclopedia
      By John E. Kleber
      OLDHAM, WILLIAM, William Oldham, soldier in the American Revolution, was born in Berkley County, Virginia, on June 17, 1753, to John and Ann (Conway) Oldham. He fought in the early part of the Revolutionary War, rose to the rank of Captain in 1775, and resigned in 1779. At that time he emigrated to the Falls of the Ohio, probably with his wife, Penelope (Pope) Oldham. He took part in some of the engagements against the Indians in the Northwest Territory and was in command of a regiment of the Kentucky militia in the ill-fated and poorly conducted expedition led by Gen. Arthur St. Clair, governor of the territory northwest of the Ohio River. On November 4, 1791, troops were attacked by Indians near the Wabash River and the border between Ohio and Indiana. William Oldham was killed, one of the hundreds killed or wounded. Two years later Capt. Alexander Gibson's men built Fort Recovery at the site of the battle. In 1823 Oldham was honored by the Kentucky legislature in naming a newly formed county for him.

      The Encyclopedia of Louisville
      By John E. Kleber
      OLDHAM, WILLIAM (b Berkeley County, Virginia, Jun 17, 1753; d Ohio, November 4, 1971). William Oldham's parents were John and Jane (Conway) Oldham. During the Revolutionary War, he served as a capain and was at the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth before he resigned and moved to the Falls of the Ohio in 1779. Oldham was one of the first magistrates, a justice of Jefferson County sheriff. Recorded in his name between 1780 and 1785 were 26,420 acres of land in Jefferson County. While commanding the Kentucky militia in Ohio, he was killed in the famous Indian battle known as St. Clair's Defeat in which 890 enlisted men and 16 officers were killed or wounded. Oldham County, Kentucky, was named in his honor.



      The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
      Volume 1 13
      Miss Mary Churchill.
      DAR ID Number: 112099
      Born in Windsor, Mo.
      Descendant of Capt. William Oldham and of Col. Armistead Churchill, as follows:
      1. Henry Catlett Churchill (b. 1845) m. 2nd 1882 Souri Campbell (1852-87) .
      2. Armistead Churchill (1810-73) m. 1834 Rebecca Catlett (1814-76).
      3. Samuel Churchill (1779-1863) m. 1803 Abigail Oldham (1789-1854).
      4. Armistead Churchill m. 1761 Elizabeth Blackwell (1741-1831); William O ldham m. 1783 Penelope Pope (1769-1854). William Oldham (1753-91) rose to the rank of captain in the Continental Army, and served with distinction until 1789, when he resigned. He was one of the pioneers of Kentucky. He was born in Virginia.
      Also No. 1125. Armistead Churchill (1733-95) commanded a regiment of the 2nd battalion, Fauquier County, Virginia militia, 1778. He was born in Middlesex County, Va.; died in Jefferson County, Ky.


      The year 1791 began happily for Col. William Oldham of Jefferson County, Kentucky. He was prospering, a respected resident of the pioneer community and his young wife, Penelope, had presented him with their fourth child, a son. The future seemed bright.
      But on September 13 of that year, Col. Oldham, possibly with a premonition of events to follow, made out his will. Less than three months later, it was probated.
      When no general officer could be found who would take the assignment, Colonel Oldham was named to command the Kentucky Militia in an autumn expedition against the Indians in Ohio. He was killed on November 4, while trying vainly to rallye been similar to Custer's Last Stand.
      It was in memory of this soldier that Oldham County was named when 32 years after his death, it was carved from parts of Jefferson, Shelby and Henry Counties.
      William was one of eight children born to John and Ann Conway Oldham in Virginia. His birthplace was in Berkley county and he arrived on 17 Jun 1753.
      He entered Revolutionary Services as an ensign at age 22, was made Captain and continued to serve the Continental forces until the spring of 1779 when he resigned to move west to the Falls of the Ohio at Louisville. He became one of the td was described as "an active, useful and public spirited Citizen."
      On his way to Kentucky, William had met William Pope and family. One of the Pope daughters was Penelope, 11 yrs old at the time. Three years later, she and William were wed.
      They had four children. The first, John, born in 1785, became a judge. Another son, Richard, born two years late became a major in the Army. Other children were Abigal born in 1789 and William 1791.
      The ill fated expedition in which Col. Oldham lost his life moved out of fort Hamilton, about 25 miles north of Cincinnati, Ohio, on October 4, 1791, under the command of Maj. Gen Arthur St. Clair. As the militiamen pushed slowly northwafndians became more and more evident.
      For some reason that remains unclear, the officers did not prepare well for the battle that was sure to come. Possibly they underestimated the size of the Indian band they were seeking - until too late. The troops were overwhelmed by ao berred to as "St. Clair's Defeat". Col. Oldham was one of 630 men massacred.
      It was a battle that Kentuckians had wanted no part of in the first place, so their feelings about the defeat were especially bitter. The state had been asked to supply 1,000 of the 2,000 who made up the original expedition.
      Kentuckian's scorn for St. Clair was mated, however, by their praise for Col. Oldham. Collins, in his history of Kentucky, speaks of Col. Oldham as a "Chivalrous and enterprising man, a brave and experienced officer."
      The decision to name the new county for him must hav been heartily ap plauded.
      Elsie Heiman.
      ***************************************** **
      This is a Message Board Post that is gatewayed to this mailing list.

      Classification: Query

      Message Board URL:

      http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/rw/Vm3.2ACEB/598

      Message Board Post:

      An article in The Herald News in LaRue Co., Kentucky, June 30, 1927, pa ge 5, column 1.

      An old bible printed in New York 121 years ago. The lists of births, deaths and marriages written on blank pages between the Old and New Testament s. The earliest date recorded was that of the birth of William Oldham on June 17, 1753. The marriage of William Oldham to Penelope Pope w as recorded as taking place July 34, 1783. A record of the marriage of He nry Churchill and Penelope Oldham was made, giving the date as January 2, 1793. One of their daughters, Eliza A. Churchill, was married to Ja mes V. Payne, November 17, 1826. The births, deaths and marriages of t he Payne, Churchill and Oldham families are recorded, the latest being that of the death of Eliza Ann Churchill on April 14, 1880.

      I DO NOT have this bible. I DO NOT know where it is.
      ******************************************* **

      Surnames: Oldham, Pope, Churchill Classification: Query

      Message Board URL:

      http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/msg/rw/Vm3.2ACEB/598.1

      Message Board Post:

      Thank you for posting the contents of the family Bible found in Kentucky, but whose [or is it which] whereabouts you do not know. These are my suspicions about the origins of this particular Oldham family, but other than that, I have no firm evidence.

      One of the early Northern Neck Virginia land grants, as abstracted by Gertrude E. Gray and published by the Genealogical Publishing Co. is a grant to one Richard Oldham, a male named Churchill, and one other person. Pope is also a prominent name in colonial Northern Neck Virginia.

      Location: Northumberland County.
      Grantee(s): Churchill, Samuel; Hill, William; Oldham, Richard; and Oldham, James.
      Description: 591 acres on a branch of the Yeocomoco, on the Morotico Road and on the Reedy Branch.
      Source: Northern Neck Grants No. 2, 1694-1700, p. 161-162 (Reel 288).

      My guess: The Oldhams who owned this Bible had Virginia roots in what is called Northern Neck (the area between the Potomac and the Rappahannock Rivers but, in colonial days, stretching to the Allegheny mountains, says one source book.

      ************************************************************
      http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=61&last=&g_p=G17&coll ection=LO Grant Title Oldham, William. Publication 6 May 1788. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Gran ts A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-19aeand Office. Grants 125- , ree ls 369-. Note Location: Jefferson County (Ky.).
      Description: 99 acres adjoining George Willson and Jenkin Phillip
      Source: Land Office Grants No. 17, 1788, p. 61 (Reel 83).
      Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virginia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia. Subject - Personal
      Oldham, William. grantee.
      Willson, George.
      Phillips, Jenkin. Subject - Topical Land titles -- Registration and transfer -- Kentuc ky -- Jefferson County Subject -Geographic Jefferson County (Ky.) -- History -- 18th centu Genre/Form Land grants -- Kentucky -- Jefferson Couyrgiand Office. Register. Land grants, 1779-
      Library of Virginia. Archives.


      System Number 000802572


      http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=692&last=&g_p=G8&coll ection=LO Grant Title Oldham, William. Publication 17 May 1787. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Gran ts A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-1aeand Office. Grants 125- , ree ls 369-. Note Location: Jefferson County (Ky.).
      Description: 2388 acres on the waters of Rough Creek a branch of Gre en River adjoining his 2837 acres survey.
      Source: Land Office Grants No. 8, 1786-1787, p. 692 (Reel 74).
      Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virgin ia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Libra ry of Virginia. Subject - Personal Oldham, William. grantee. Subject - Topical Land titles -nr -- Kentuc ky -- Jefferson County Subject -Geographic Jefferson County (Ky.) -- History -- 18th centu Genre/Form Land grants -- Kentucky -- Jefferson County. Added Entry Virginia. Land Office. Register. Land grants, 1779-


      Library of Virginia. Archives.


      System Number 000802570


      http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=715&last=&g_p=G8&coll ection=LO Grant Title Oldham, William. Publication 21 May 1787. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Gran ts A-Z, 1-124, reels 42-1;r
      nia State Land Office. Grants 125- , ree ls 369-. Note Location: Jefferson County (Ky.).
      Description: 2837 acres on the east side of Tuels Creek a branch of Rou gh Creek a branch of Green River.
      Source: Land Office Grants No. 8, 1786-1787, p. 715 (Reel 74).
      Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virgin ia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Libra ry of Virginia. Subject - Personal Oldham, William. grantee. Subject - Topical Land titles -
      n and transfer -- Kentuc ky -- Jefferson County Subject -Geographic Jefferson County (Ky.) -- History -- 18th centu Genre/Form Land grants -- Kentucky -- Jefferson County. Added Entry Virginia. Land Office. Register. Land grants, 1779-


      Library of Virginia. Archives.


      System Number 000802571



      URL (Click on link) http://lvaimage.lib.va.us/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first =66&last=&g_p=G4&collection=LO Grant Title Oldham, William. Publication 20 June 1786. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Gran ts A-
      Z, 1-124, reels 42-190; Virginia State Land Office. Grants 125- , ree ls 369-. Note Location: Jefferson County (Ky.).
      Description: 3800 acres on the east waters of the Little Yellow Bank Cr eek and the head of Sugar tree run a branch of Limestone.
      Source: Land Office Grants No. 4, 1786, p. 66 (Reel 70).
      Part of the index to the recorded copies of grants issued by the Virgin ia Land Office. The collection is housed in the Archives at the Libra ry of Virginia. Subject - Personal Oldham, William. grantee. Subject - Topical Land titles -
      n and transfer -- Kentuc ky -- Jefferson County Subject -Geographic Jefferson County (Ky.) -- History -- 18th centu Genre/Form Land grants -- Kentucky -- Jefferson County. Added Entry Virginia. Land Office. Register. Land grants, 1779-


      Library of Virginia. Archives.


      System Number 000802569

      Revolutionary War figure. Served as captain, participating in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth. Commanded Kentucky militia in Ohio against Indian settlements. Killed in battle called St. Clair's Defeat in which 890 enlisted men and 16 offi
      cers were killed or wounded. Oldham County in Kentucky named after him.

      **********

      OLDHAM---PAYNE---CHURCHILL---(BIBLE)
      L.L.Salsman
      Posted: 20 Sep 2005 2:23AM GMT

      Classification: Query
      Surnames: An article in The Herald News in LaRue Co., Kentucky, June 30, 1927, page 5, column 1.

      An old bible printed in New York 121 years ago. The lists of births, deaths and marriages written on blank pages between the Old and New Testaments. The earliest date recorded was that of the birth of William Oldham on June 17, 1753. The marriag
      e of William Oldham to Penelope Pope was recorded as taking place July 34, 1783. A record of the marriage of Henry Churchill and Penelope Oldham was made, giving the date as January 2, 1793. One of their daughters, Eliza A. Churchill, was married to James V. Payne, November 17, 1826. The births, deaths and marriages of the Payne, Churchill and Oldham families are recorded, the latest being that of the death of Eliza Ann Churchill on April 14, 1880.

      I DO NOT have this bible. I DO NOT know where it is.

      Kentucky, Wills and Probate Records, 1774-1989

      Last Will and Testament of William Oldham

      I William Oldham of Jefferson County and State of Virginia do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following Viz

      I leave to my wife Penelope the Tract of land on Chanswell Run and a Negro Man named Bosen with my House Furniture and this part of all my stock for use also during her widowhood I leave to her _______and ____ the residue of my Estate both real and personal. I bequeath with the two Negros ____ I leave my wife Penelope during her windowhood to be equally divided between my fore children John Richard Abigail and William Oldham excepting a presentation of fore hundred acres of Land near Bulletts Lick to them and their heirs forever---

      I leave Elisabeth Homes fore hundred acres of Land a presentation near Bulletts Lick to her and her Heirs forever.

      Lastly I nominate and appoint my Friends Richard C. Anderson, Richard Taylor and Jacob Funk, Gent. Executors of this my last will and Tesatment witness my nand and Seal this 13th September 1791.

      Sealed & delivered in
      Presence of Will Oldham SEAL
      George Pearce

      At a Court held for Jefferson County on 6th Dec 1791

      This last Will and Tesatament of William Oldham dec'd was produced in Court, and proved by the Oath of George Pearce a witness thereto, and it appearing to the satisfaction of the court to be the hand writing of the said Will Oldham the same was ordered to be recorded.

    • (Research):
      SCOTT, Joseph T., Lexington, Kentucky., then Orleans Parish, Louisiana

      Scott, Joseph Thompson, physician, was born at Lexington, Ky., March 20, 1 833, son of Joseph and Lucy C. (Webb) Scott, born, respectively, at Neshaminy Falls, Pa., 1780, and Lexington, Ky. Joseph Scott, the father, was a graduate of Jefferson Medical college, Philadelphia, and practiced his profession at Chilicothe, O., where he married Miss Martha Finley, his first wife. After the death of the first wife he changed his place of residence to Lexington, Ky., where he later married Miss Webb (who was an aunt of the wife of Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes), and continued to reside at Lexington until his death.

      Several members of the Scott family served in the Revolutionary army, the most prominent among these being Gen. Matthew Thompson Scott, a grandson of Gen. William Thompson, also a Revolutionary soldier. Gen. M. T. Scott was the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. Lucy C. Webb was a daughter of Capt. Isaac Webb of the 4th V. regiment. The families of Webb, Ware, Thompson, Humphry, Fullerton, Taylor, Taylor, Tyler, Page, Talliaferro, Adams, Dean, Hyde, Savage, and Scott, are all related to Joseph Thompson Scott and wife, and many members of these families served in the Revolutionary army, the War of 1812, and in the various Indian wars of that period and later.

      Joseph T. Scott enlisted as a surgeon in the 1st Mo. infantry, C. S. A. He was taken prisoner at Camp Jackson, but was shortly afterward exchanged and became a surgeon on the staff of Gen. Frost. During the course of his service in the Confederate army he participated in the memorable engagements of Carthage, Elkhorn Tavern, Iuka, Corinth, and Shiloh. Politically he was allied with the whigs prior to the Civil war, and afterward with the democratic party. Dr. Scott served as a member of the Charity hospital board of administrators during the administration of Gov. Wiltz. In church affiliation he was a Catholic.

      Dr. Scott was married to Miss Isidora Churchill Dean, daughter of Capt. James Savage Dean, of the U. S. army, and Harriette M. (Christy) Dean, of St. Louis, Mo., where the wedding took place. This union was blessed with the following children, in the order named: Howard, a civil engineer, who married Miss Roma de Rudio and is at this time located in British Columbia; Dora, wife of Brig.-Gen. C. A. Devol, of the quartermaster's corps, U. S. A.; Joseph Tilford, graduate of the medical department of Tulane university, class of 1894, and a practicing physician in the city of New Orleans since that date. The last named is also acting assistant surgeon, U. S. Public Health Service; president of the Board of Pension Examiners; medical examiner for the U. S. Civil Service Commission, 10th La. district; member Orleans Parish Medical association, Louisiana State Medical association, American Medical association, Southern Medical association, St. Luke's Guild; National Geographical society, and Kappa Alpha fraternity (Southern). Dr. Joseph Tilford Scott was a member of Washington artillery for 18 years, and was serving as surgeon at the time of his resignation.

      He married Miss Florestine Forn o, of New Orleans, daughter of Capt. Lawrence Forno, a member of Barlow 's battery, 1st La. cavalry, Forrest's command, and who served also as a captain in the ''White League.'' Two children have been born to Dr. Joseph Tilford Scott and wife, namely, Joseph T. and Lucill e. The other children of Dr. Joseph Thompson Scott and wife were Harriet M ., Lucille M. (deceased, 1914), Arthur B., of Mississippi, who married Mi ss Corrine de B. Roman; Aline A., and Joseph N., the two last-named dyi ng in infancy. Capt. John Scott, great-grandfather of the subject of th is sketch, served as aide on Gen. George Washington's staff, and died fr om wounds received in the French and Indian wars. He fought with Wo lf at Quebec. Capt. James Savage Dean, father of the wife of Joseph Thomp son Scott, was born in the state of New York. He served in the War of 18 12 and died in service at about the time of the outbreak of the Mexican wa r, having served also in several of the various Indian campaigns of the ti me. Capt. Dean was a nephew of Silas Dean, who served as minister plenipot entiary and ambassador extraordinary to France, and was a cotemporary of B enjamin Franklin. Dr. Joseph Thompson Scott was a descendant of Robert Sc ott, an old covenanter hero, and member of the Scottish parliament, who fo ught at the battle of Bothwell bridge. John, the eldest son of Robert, ca me to America in 1725, and his son, Matthew, married Miss Betsy Thompson, daughter of Brig.-Gen. William Thompson of t he Revolutionary army. Joseph Thompson Scott began his professional educa tion at Transylvania university, Lexington, Ky., and afterward studi ed at Paris, France, where he remained 5 years, following which he return ed to the United States and graduated from McDowell Medical college, St. Louis, Mo ., in 1860. Following his graduation he was commissioned as a surge on in the 1st regiment, Mo. militia, but soon resigned to return to Par is on the suggestion of Prof. Louis, who invited him to become his chi ef of clinic. At the beginning of the Civil war, 8 months later, he hasten ed home and cast his lot with the citizen soldiery of Missouri, under Go v. Jackson, though urged by minister Falkner, an intimate friend, to ent er the Union army. While serving as surgeon of his regiment he was captured, and was p aroled at Camp Jackson, near St. Louis, May 10, 1861. As soon as exchang ed he rejoined the Missouri troops under Gen. Sterling Price, and as surge on of Guibor's battery, 1st Mo. infantry, and as a member of the staff of Gen. D. M. Frost, took part in the campaigns west of the Mississippi ri ver, including the battle of Elkhorn Tavern. Later he was on duty with t he troops under Gen. Price at Corinth and Iuka, and was promoted to the ra nk of chief medical director of Gen. Van Dorn's division. Oct. 16, 186 2, he was ordered to report to Lieut.-Gen. T. H. Holmes for duty with Brig .-Gen. D. M. Frost, and continued on duty with that command until near t he close of hostilities. In Feb., 1863, he was detailed by the war department as a member and recorder of the medical board for the examinati on of officers in the trans-Mississippi department and applicants for appo intment in the medical department of the army. At the time of the surrend er he was stationed at Washington, Ark., and was included in the surrend er of Gen. Richard Taylor's command. At that time he was serving as medic al inspector, army of the west. At the close of the war Dr. Scott locat ed at New Orleans and soon built up a large practice, enjoying populari ty with all classes of people, but more particularly among his ex-Confeder ate comrades. It is said of him that he was always ready and willing to a ssist those in need, with professional services or otherwise. The doctor w as a member of the commission of experts of the national board of health w ho worked with the Howard association during periods of great danger at N ew Orleans, and in the course of his professional experience also serv ed as a member of the board of administrators of the New Orleans Charity hospital. He was a member of Camp No. 9, United Confederate Veter ans, and also a member of the American Legion of Honor. He died June 2 5, 1896. Maj. William D. Christy, maternal grandfather of the wife of Jos eph Thompson Scott, was born Jan. 10, 1764, in Carlisle, Penn., his paren ts having come from Dundee, Scotland. His father, Thomas Christy, was a c aptain in the British army, and came to America before the struggle for in dependence began. He participated in the battle of Monongahela, and was s everely wounded during that engagement. It should also be stated here th at Capt. James Savage Dean, father of Mrs. Joseph Thompson Scott, was wi th Perry at the battle of Lake Erie, when only a boy. Later he became cap tain of the Second dragoons. In 1788 Gov. Randolph of Virginia appoint ed Maj. William Christy, just mentioned above, as lieutenant of a tro op of cavalry in Jefferson county. He was a surveyor and had been occupi ed with that work in Kentucky and Indiana several years prior to receivi ng this commission. In the campaign of 1791 against the Indians of the no rthwest, Maj. Christy served as adjutant of Gen. St Clair's army, a nd it is related that he was one of the last 3 officers to leave the field . On this occasion he saw Col. Oldham dying and went to his assistance, rece iving Col. Oldham's last message to his wife. Afterward, remembering h is pledge to the mother of Lieut. Edward Taylor, whose sister he afterwa rd married, he galloped on and found that youth by his gun, wounded and co vered with blood. In a hand-to-hand struggle with an Indian, Christy c ut down the savage and assisted Taylor from the field. In 1792 Christy w as appointed adjutant of the 1st regiment, Ky. militia. In 1794 he joined Gen. Wayne and served in his campaign until the Indians had been punish ed and sued for peace. In 1799 he was appointed to the 33rd regiment, K y. militia. In 1804 Maj. Christy sold his land in Kentucky and moved to S t. Louis, Mo., and in 1806 he was appointed judge of the court of common p leas and justice of the general quarter sessions of the peace in and for t he district of St. Louis; in 1809, trustee for the town and precincts of S t. Louis; in 1809 also aide-de-camp to the governor and commander-in-chi ef of the territory of Louisiana; in 1809 again, major-commander of the Lo uisiana rangers, on which occasion Gov. Lewis is said to have remarke d: "I know Maj. Christy to be wise in council and swift in action." In 1 812 Maj. Christy was appointed judge of the court of common pleas and cour ts of quarter-sessions for the district of St. Louis; in 1814, audit or of public accounts for the state of Missouri. Under presidents Monroe a nd Jackson, for 13 years Maj. Christy was registrar of the public land off ice for the district of St. Louis, and resigned in 1833 when age and bad h ealth had rendered him too infirm for public office. Maj. Christy di ed in 1837. His wife, Miss Martha Thompson Taylor, was a first cous in to Pres. Zachary Taylor. She survived her husband until April, 1849. Louisiana: Comprising Sketches of Parishes, Towns, Events, Institution s, and Persons, Arranged in Cyclopedic Form (volume 3), pp. 790-793. Edit ed by Alc e Fortier, Lit.D. Published in 1914, by Century Historical Asso ciation.
    Person ID I2400  oldham
    Last Modified 27 Feb 2017 

    Father OLDHAM, John,   b. 17 Oct 1708, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt Mar 1765, Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia), USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Mother CONWAY, Ann Nancy,   b. 1718, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1796, Hampshire County, Virginia (Now West Virginia), USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Family ID F1002  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family POPE, Penelope,   b. 12 Feb 1769,   d. 16 Sep 1821, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years) 
    Married 24 Jul 1783  Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, Judge John Pope,   b. 28 Feb 1785, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Apr 1858, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Major Richard A.,   b. 13 Mar 1787,   d. 31 Aug 1837, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
     3. OLDHAM, Abigail Pope,   b. 1 May 1789, Woodville, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jul 1854, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
     4. OLDHAM, William,   b. 1791,   d. Abt 1795, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2017 
    Family ID F1018  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 17 Jun 1753 - Berkeley, Albemarle County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - 5th Pennsylvania Lt. Col - 1777-1778 - Valley Forge, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 1783 - Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Jul 1783 - Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - Rough Creek 600 acres Book 3, page 231 - 13 Feb 1789 - Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - Pottengers Creek 1000 Acres Book 3, Page 232 - 8 Oct 1790 - Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWill - States Jefferson County, State of Virginia - 13 Sep 1791 - Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Nov 1791 - St. Clair's Defeat, Recovery, Mercer County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 8 Nov 1791 - Samuel Oldham Burial Ground, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - Pottengers Creek 113 Acres Bok 3, Page 232 - 3 Aug 1792 - Nelson County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Oldham, Colonel William H. <br>
1753 - 1791
    Oldham, Colonel William H.
    1753 - 1791

    Land Grant

    Back
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War<br>
Grave Marker
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War
    Grave Marker

    Oldham, Colonel William H.<br>
1753 - 1791
    Oldham, Colonel William H.
    1753 - 1791

    Land Grant
    Oldham, Colonel William<bR>
1753-1791
    Oldham, Colonel William
    1753-1791

    Land Grant

    Settlement of Early Kentucky

  • Sources 
    1. [S3077] Todd G. Oldham.

    2. [S3606] The Kentucky Land Grants, Willard Rouse Jillson, (Standard Printing Company, 1925).

    3. [S1945] Genealogical Abstracts from 18th-Century Virginia Newspapers, Robert K. Headley Jr., (comp.(1987). pg 253), 195 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S1680] Cemetery Records.

    5. [S1269] Vital Records, Jefferson County, Kentucky.