Oldham Family History

OLDHAM,  Jesse

OLDHAM, Jesse

Male 1736 - 1814  (78 years)

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  • Name OLDHAM, Jesse 
    Born 1733-1736  Prince William County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Gender Male 
    Military 1775  [3
    Census 1810  Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Honors Boonesborough, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation Carpenter  [4
    Will Apr 1814  Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Oldham, Jesse<br>  abt 1733-1814
    Oldham, Jesse
    abt 1733-1814

    Will

    Page 1
    Oldham, Jesse<br>  abt 1733-1814
    Oldham, Jesse
    abt 1733-1814

    Will

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    Oldham, Jesse<Br>  abt 1733-1814
    Oldham, Jesse
    abt 1733-1814

    Will

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    Oldham, Jesse<Br>  abt 1733-1814
    Oldham, Jesse
    abt 1733-1814

    Will

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    Died 4 Apr 1814  Otter Creek, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 5
    Notes 
    • (Research):
      Minutes of the Hillsborough District Superior Court
      North Carolina. Superior Court (Hillsborough District)
      September 22, 1769
      Volume 08, Page 72

      North Carolina,

      Hillsboro District Ss.
      At a Superior Court of Justice begun and held for the district aforesaid at the Court house in Hillsboro on the 22nd day of September, in the year of Our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and sixty nine, 1769.

      Present
      The Honorable Maurice Moore Esq. Associate Justice.
      The Sheriff of Granville County returns his list of Jurors, viz. James Yancey, Charles Rust Eaton, Reuben Searcy, Solomon Alston, Sherrard Harris, David Mitchell, Jesse Saunders, Cuthbird Hutson, Samuel Sneed, William Potter, John Young, Robert Lanier.

      The Sheriff of Orange County returned the following list of Jurors, viz. John Hogan, John Payne, John Gray, Enoch Bradley, John Patterson, Nathanial Hart, John Nunn, Washam Glenn, Charles Matthews, Tignal Jones, Nathanial Jones, Wm. Rhodes, Richard Berry, William Nunn, Jun. Ebener Starns, John McDonald, John Lowe, Gabriel Davie, William Stroude, Jun. Joseph Gold, Archibald Boling, Robert Lytle, George Foote, Samuel Parkes, Benjamin Black, Chas. Powell, John Powell, Jessie Oldham, William Pauly, Thomas Connelly, James Craig, William Lassiter, John Hunter, Joseph King, Thomas Hart & James Minnis.

      On motion being made by John Noe, son of Peter Noe, (Miller) that he might be naturalized & proving to the Court that he had taken the sacrament of the Lord's Supper & other requisites by Act of Parliament specified, he accordingly was naturalized by taking the oaths, and making & subscribing the declaration by Law appointed.


      Notes from Judith H. Martin"
      1. JESSE7 OLDHAM (RICHARD WILLIAM6, JAMES5, JOHN4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 1733 in Prince William Co., VA, and died 04 Apr 1814 in Boonesboro, Madison Co., KY. He married ELIZABETH SIMPSON 21 Oct 1757 in Orange Co., NC, daughter of RICHARD SIMPSON and MARY KINCHELOE. She was born Abt. 1740 in Prince William Co., VA, and died Abt. 1813 in Boonesboro, Madison Co., KY.

      Notes for JESSE OLDHAM:
      U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Jesse Oldham
      Name: Jesse Oldham
      Gender: male
      Birth Place: VA
      Birth Year: 1733
      Spouse Name: Elizabeth Simpson
      Marriage State: of KY

      "moved to North Carolina before the Revolution, and lived for a time on the Yadkin River, not a great distance from the Guilford Court-House. (Miller, p.478)

      Event: migration 1775 Madison Co, KY
      Jesse Oldham came to Boonesborough in 1775 where he raised a crop of corn with Nathaniel Hart

      4 October 1787
      Caswell Co., NC Deed Books 1777-1817
      Book F, pp. 178-179
      Jesse OLDHAM and his wife Elizabeth of Caswell Co. to Thomas HORNBUCKLE of FAIRFAX CO., VA, for 220 pounds, 403ac -- 2 tracts, one conveyed by Richard SIMPSON, the other by the State on the south fork of STONEY CREEK including plantation wherMies adj. Thomas BRINSFIELD, SIMPSON, Tyree HARRIS, HEWES' corner.
      Wits: William HORNBUCKLE, Simpson HARRIS, Thomas BRINSFIELD.

      "Jesse was married a long time before the war, and had a number of grown children, and several married ones, when he came to Kentucky from the Yadkin River with Colonel Daniel Boone, and was with Colonel Boone and Captain William Twetty atr the Litle Fort, when attacked by the Indians...." (Miller, p.473)

      FAYETTE COUNTY KY RECORDS
      By Michael L. Cook & Bettie Cummings Cook.
      Jesse Oldham & First Kentucky Corn Crop
      Volume 1..Page 187 & 188..
      Deposition of JESSE OLDHAM, aged 72 years (taken at an improvement of Nathaniel HART, deceased, in Madison County, on March 3, 1802, before Robert Caldwell):

      Deponent came to KY from NC in the year 1775 [Note by Staples: one of the five brothers in Battle of Guilford Court House; he was also in Twitty's Fort when Indians attacked same] at which time he passed by the blue licks and from thence nearemment to Twitty's Fort and the trace he travelled was then called and known by the name of Boone's Trace. In the year 1775 he together with Nathaniel HART and others planted a crop of corn at Boonesborough. He came out to KY again in the spring of 1779 at which time he together with Nathaniel HART and others raised a crop of corn at Boonesborough and in the same year raised a crop of corn at this improvement and also at the deponent's improvement which lies near to this place on the creek. He has never known or heard this improvement called by any other name than Nathaniel HART'S improvement.

      Question by complainant:
      Have you not always understood that Nathaniel HART obtained his settlement and improvement by virtue of the improvement?
      Answer:
      Yes I did; I was not here when the Commissioners sat and never saw the certificate until today.

      Question by defendant:
      Did Nathaniel HART and you raise the crop of corn in partnership?
      Answer:
      No, his corn for himself and mine for myself.

      Question by same:
      Was not there a contract between you and Nathaniel HART, that if you never came to the county he was to claim both claims?
      Answer:
      Yes, he was.

      Question by the complainant:
      Was not Nathaniel HART to clear out your claim on the halves and if you never came to KY he was to have all of it?
      Answer:
      He was so. My claim and Nathaniel HART'S claim were two separate and distinct claims. I did not expect to get more than 400 acres of land and that for raising corn in 1779.

      Question by defendant:
      What do you suppose is the distance between Nathaniel's HART'S improvement and yours?
      Answer:
      I suppose it may be about a mile.

      Question by same:
      Was there any improvements at this place when you first came to KY in 1775?
      Answer:
      Not as I know of.

      Question by plaintiff:
      Did not Nathaniel HART leave his negroes at Boonesborough in 1775 to make his crop of corn?
      Answer:
      I cannot tell.

      Volume 1..Page 191 & 192..
      Desposition of JESSE OLDHAM (taken at his own house in Madison County on January 7, 1805, before John WILKERSON, a single magistrate):
      That Silver Creek and Hart's Fork of Silver Creek, Boone's old trace, Squire Boone's stockfield tract, and Nathaniel HART'Ss improvement on Boone's old trace were places of great notoriety and well known in KY in the year 1779. That Boone's old trace was marked out in the year 1775 and was the road leading from Boonesborough and the upper parts of KY through the Wilderness, which was generally travelled. That Nathaniel HART'S improvement was within sight of Boone's old trace and must have been well known to every person travelling or passing along that trace as there was a considerable quantity of corn made at it in the summer of 1779.

      Volume 1..Page 257..
      Deposition of JESSE OLDHAM (taken December 1, 1810):
      States that Nathaniel HART and I married sisters. Boone's old trace was marked out in year 1775 and was the road leading from Boonesborough and upper part of KY through the wilderness and it was then generally traveled.

      Volume 1..Page 261..
      Deposition of EDWARD WILLIAMS (taken at house of Nicholas ANDERSON in Montgomery County, on May 14, 1804):
      He set out from Boonesborough in the month of June 11, 1779 to go to VA and encamped the first night on waters of Silver Creek in company with a number of others and that Nathaniel HART and JESSE OLDHAM set out at same time for the settlementebliged to go out of their way for a horse that was bit by a snake and did not join the company until that evening. That when the said HART and OLDHAM set out from Boonesborough they appointed to meet the company at said JESSE OLDHAM's improvement at the creek. That they all set out together the next morning and passed by Nathaniel HART'S improvement and said HART informed deponent and company that it was his improvement and there was a present at Boonesborough when Nathaniel HART laid in his claim before the Commissioner's for his settlement and preemption, and the said HART informed this deponent that he had obtained his certificate for this improvement on Silver Creek.


      Madison County, KY, Will Book B, p.38
      "In the name of God, amen. I, Jesse Oldham, of Madison County, and State of Kentucky, being in my perfect senses, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. First: I give and beqeath my soul to Almighty God, that gave it, and my bodyed by my executors in a christian like manner, and as touching such worldly goods as it hath pleased God to bless and endow me with, I give and dispose of in the manner and form following:
      Item -- I give and bequeath to my daughter, Amy Burton, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      Item -- I give and bequeath unto my son, Richard Oldham, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      Item -- I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Ann and George, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      Item -- I give and bequeth unto my daughter, Anna Harris, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      Item -- I give and bequeath unto my son, Tyre Oldam fifty pounds, Kentucky currency, and no more
      Item -- I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Frances Oldham, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      Item -- I give and bequeath unto my daughter Sally Burton, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      My will and desire is that Jesse Oldham, Elias Oldham, Eady Oldham, Nathaniel Oldham, and John K. Oldham, those five last mentioned children, shall have all the residue of my estate, to be equally divided amongst them, both real and personaley will.
      Lastly, I appoint my son, Jesse Oldham, and my son Nathaniel Oldham, my whole sole executors, of this my last will and testament.
      In witness whereof I have set my hand, seal, this 28 day of Jan 1814, JWAAW OLDHAM (Seal.)
      Signed and sealed in the presence of: -- Daniel Williams, Frances Hlly, Nancy (X) Hally, Betsy Hally.
      At a court held for Madison County on the fourth day of April 1814, this writing was proven to be the last will and testament of Jesse Oldham, by the oaths of Daniel Williams and Frances Hally two subscribing witnesses thereto, and ordered toee, and the same has been done accordingly. (B page 38.) Teste, William Irvine, Clerk.
      (Miller, p.479)


      W.H. Miller notes (pp.480-481): Mr. Thompson B. OLDHAM of Burgin, Ky., is authority for the following statements, viz:
      Jesse Oldham and his wife Elizabeth Simpson, had a grand-son towit:
      Williamson Oldham who went from Kentucky to Tennessee. He studied law, and was licensed to practice and moved to Arkansas, and became Judge of the Supreme Court thereof, and subsequently removed to Texas, and was a very distinguished lawyer adoan. "Judge Oldham use to correspond by letter with Abner Oldham, (father of Thompson), of Madison County, Ky., and in one of his letters he wrote "tell Aunt Edith, she is the only woman in Kentucky who I can say spoiled the Judge of the Supreme Court of Arkansas."
      Additional sketch, furnished by Mrs. Rebecca J. Fisher, President of the William B. Travis Chapter Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Austin, Texas: Capital. 'State Librarian."
      WILLIAM S. OLDHAM
      William S. OLDHAM, was born in Franklin County, Tenn., on June 19, 1813, and was a descendant of an old Virginia family. At the age of thirteen years, he opened a school in mountains of Tennessee, in order to procure means to continue his edu.aing followed this calling two years, he obtained a situation in the office of the District Clerk of Franklin County. Judge Nathan GREEN directed his study of law. In 1836, he removed to Fayetteville, Arkansas, where he formed a partnership with S.G. SNEED.
      At Fayetteville, Mr. OLDHAM soon established an eminent reputation, and in 1842, was speaker of the Arkansas House of Representatives, in 1844, he was chosen almost unanimously by the Legislature an associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Arkansas, and held that position until the fall of 1848, when in consequence of ill health he resigned, in contemplation of making his future home in Texas.
      In the spring of 1849, he removed to Texas, and located at Austin, ** in 1858, the Legislature of Texas passed an act authorizing the Governor to receive proposals for the preparation of a digest of all the general statute laws of the state. The contract for preparing this digest was awarded to Messrs. OLDHAM and WHITE.
      In 1861, Judge OLDHAM, was strongly in favor of secession. He was chosen a member of the Provisional Congress, at Montgomery, and was subsequently elected a senator in the Congress of the Confederate States and held that position until the close of the war.
      At the close of the war Judge OLDHAM, retired to Mexico. Upon the fall of the empire in 1866, he went to Canada. He returned to Texas, and having settled in Houston, devoted himself exclusively to the practice of his profession. He was stricken with typhoid fever and died with that disease at Houston, on the 8th day of May 1868.
      The Bench and Bar of Texas, by James D. Lynch, pages 254-261.

      Notes for ELIZABETH SIMPSON:
      "In 1798, Martha Simpson a resident of Caswell County North Carolina died, and in her will devised property to Elizabeth Oldham, wife of Jesse Oldham." (Miller, p.478)

      Elizabeth SIMPSON married Jesse OLDHAM was a sister to:
      Lydia SIMPSON married Zaccheus TATE
      Nancy Ann 'Annie' SIMPSON married Waddy TATE (My 4th great grandparents)
      Sarah 'Sally' SIMPSON married Nathaniel HART
      Mary Ann 'Mollie' married Tyree HARRIS

      More About JESSE OLDHAM and ELIZABETH SIMPSON:
      Marriage: 21 Oct 1757, Orange Co., NC

      January Court 1787
      Book B. 1786-1787
      Page 162

      TYREE HARRIS - Will - w. 1 Sept 1786. Daughters Nancy Abercrombie, Frances Daney wife of Cornelius Daney; sons Tyree, Simpson, Robert (land in Rockingham Co. on little Troublesome Cr), Christopher (land on High Rock Cr., Rockingham Co.); daughters, Ede Harris, Liddy Harris; grandson William Chapman Abercromby. Exec: son Tyree and son Simpson and son in law Cornelius Dabney. Wit: John Jones, Jesse Oldham

      rom Hdanw@aol.com
      to NCCASWEL-L@rootsweb.com,
      OLDHAM-L@rootsweb.com
      date Tue, Jan 27, 2009 at 11:52 PM
      subject [OLDHAM] Mention of Jesse Oldham and George Oldham - 1778

      >From Caswell Co., NC land entries - Family History Library (FHL) film no.
      0018416

      No. 790

      William Eads [?] enters 400 acres of land, joining the lines of Nathan Rice,
      Jesse Oldham and others lying on the South fork on Stoney Creek, including
      his improvements, bought by Geo. Oldham

      5h Decem 1778

      Submitted by E. W.Wallace
      descendant of Jesse Oldham

      WFT Vol 1 #3967 - gives b.1733 in probably Northumberland County, Virgin ia d. about 1836 probably Kentucky.
      Fact #2 - 1775 Commissioned Ensign, Virginia Militia
      Fact #3 - 1779 Resigned Commission, moved to Louisville, Kentucky C.V.Jackson notes: shows died 1774
      between1745 and 1757 enlisted in 2nd Co. Rangers
      1764 Aug 7, with Richard Simpson ordered to lay out road in Orange County, North Carolina became Caswell County, 1777
      1769 Sep 22, on sheriff's list of jurors in North Carolina court
      1777 Sep 10, with Moses2 on jury to lay out road in Caswell Co, North Carolina
      1778, May 26, 370 acres on south fork Stoney Creek, 220 acres adjace nt line Tyree Harris on Stoney Creek
      1778, Jun 3, summoned to serve on Caswell Co jury
      1779, Apr 15, signed rules adopted by association of settlers of Boonesborough, made deposition that he accompanied Daniel Boone to Kentuc ky in 1775 and fought in battle
      1779, Nov 2, 100 acres on waters of Stoney Creek
      1781, Mar 19, selected for Caswell Co. jury
      (1972 p33) acct of comptroller's office 1777-1783, Bk D, p 56 Jesse1 acct. of U.S. with North Carolina Rev., Bk. p 134 - Jesse1
      1782, Mar 5, called as juror Caswell Co.
      1780-1786 St David's district, Caswell Co. tax lists, son Richard7 on 1784 tax list and 1786 census
      1786 census, 1 white male aged 21-60, 4 other males, 5 females, 4 bla ck, Richard7 1-0-0-0-0
      1784 670 acres Stoney Creek Caswell County, Virginia
      1786, Oct 20, son Richard7 m. Ursley Duke Williams Peeples
      1787 sold Caswell Co. Virginia land
      1789 Madison County, Kentucky tax list with sons Richard7, Tyre1 and George8 Served in French & Indian Wars with Capt John Ashby's Second Rangers.

      C. V. Jackson Cocke County Banner Article 1976: By 1764 he had moved to Or ange County, North Carolina settling in the area that later became Caswell Co, Tax Records of that county in 1777 show that he had been join ed by his father, his brother in-law and all of his brothers with the exception of James. Their neighbors along Stoney Creek included Richard Simpson, Hezekiah Rice and Maxwell Hensley - all of whom had daughters married to Oldham brothers. Jesse made at least one trip to Kentucky with Daniel Boone and helped plant the first corn crop at Boonesborough. He is shown as one of the early settlers of Boonesborough, Kentucky.

      LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JESSE OLDHAM "In the name of God, amen. I, Jesse Oldham, of Madison County and State of Kentucky, being in my perfect senses, do make and ordain this my last will and testament. First: I give and bequeath my soul to Almighty God, that gave it, and my body to be buried by my executors in a Christian like manner, and as touching such worldly goods as it hath pleased God to bless and endow me with, I give and dispose of in the manner and form following: Item - I give and bequest unto my daughter, Amy Burton, one shilling sterling, and no more. Item - I give and bequest unto my son, Richard Oldham, one shilling sterling, and no more. Item - I give and bequest unto my daughter, MaryAnn and George, one shilling sterling, and no more. Item - I give and bequest unto my daughter, Anna Harris, one shilling sterling, and no more. Item - I give and bequest unto my son, Tyre Oldham fifty pounds, Kentucky currency, and no more. Item - I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Frances Oldham one shilling sterling, and no more. Item - I give and bequeath unto my daughter Sally Burton, one shilling sterling, and no more.
      My will and desire is that Jesse Oldham, Elias Oldham, Eady Oldham, Nathaniel Oldham and John K. Oldham, those five last mentioned children, shall have all the residue of my estate, to be equally divided amongst them, both real and personas

      Lastly, I appoint my son, Jesse Oldham, and my son Nathaniel Oldham, my sole executors, of this my last will and testament.
      In witness whereof I have set my hand, seal, this 28 day of Jan. 1814 .

      JESSE(His ma rk X ) OLDHAM (Seal)
















      Signed and sealed in the presence of:----
      Daniel Williams
      Frances Hally
      Nancy (X) Hally, Betsy Hally

      Wm. Miller History pg 480: Mr. Thompson B. Oldham of Burgin, Kentucky is a uthority for the following statements, viz:
      Jesse Oldham and his wife Elizabeth Simpson, had a grandson, to wit;
      Williamson Oldham who went from Kentucky to Tennessee. He studied law, and was licensed to practice and moved to Arkansas and became Judge of the Supreme Court thereof, and subsequently removed to Texas and was a very distinguished lawyd.
      ge Oldham used to correspond by letter with Abner Oldham (father of Thompson B. Oldham) of Madis on County, Kentucky and in one of his letters he wrote "Tell Aunt Edith, s he is the only woman in Kentucky who I can say spoiled the Judge of the Su preme Court of Arkansas."
      Additional sketch, furnished by Mrs. Rebecca J. Fisher, Preside nt of the William B. Travis Chapter Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Au stin, Texas: Capital. "State Librarian"
      William S. Oldham William S. Oldham, was born in Franklin County, Tennessee on June 19, 18 13 and was a descendant of an old Virginia family. At the age of thirte en years, he opened a school in the mountains.odemoved to Fayetteville, Arkansas, where he formed a partnership wi th S. G. Sneed.

      At Fayetteville, Mr. Oldham soon established an eminent reputation a nd in 1842, was speaker of the Arkansas House of Representatives, in 18 44 he was chosen almost unanimously by the Legislature an associate Justi ce of the Supreme Court
      d held that position until the fa ll of 1848, when in consequence of ill health he resigned, in contemplati on of making his future home in Texas.
      In the spring of 1849, he removed to Texas, and located at Austi n. In 1858 the Legislature of Texas passed an act authorizing the Govern or to receive proposals for the preparation of a digest of all the gener al statute laws of the statt w as awarded to Messrs. Oldham and White.
      In 1861 Judge Oldham was strongly in favor of succession. He was cho sen a member of the Provisional Congress at Montgomery and was subsequent ly elected a senator in the Contress of the Confederate States and held th at position until tfa

      At the close of the war Judge Oldham, retired to Mexico. Upon the f all of the empire in 1866, he went to Canada. He returned to Texas, and h aving settled in Houston, devoted himself exclusively to the practice of h is profession. He w
      hoid fever and died with that dise ase at Houston, on the 8th day of May 1868. The Bench and Bar of Texa s, by James D. Lynch, pages 254-261.

      Original Message: ----------------- From: Hdanw@aol.com Date: Sun, 18 Apr 2004 15:41:55 EDT To: OLDHAM-L@rootsweb.com Subject: [OLDHAM] Re: [VARICHMO] Some Early Oldhams of Richmond Co., VA


      Thanks so much for the information about the possibilty of adequate searches in Maryland. Yes, I have collected colonial Oldhams on both sides of t Potomac--Virginia and Maryland.

      The difficulty is that these were colonial Oldhams, and the records for Northern Neck Virginia, with certain exceptions, seem to be hit or mis Furthermore, it seems that around Richmond Co., Northumberland Co., and other surrounding counties, the county lines are fuzzy, or else our folks went t o *foreign* courthouses to record their deeds--or, maybe they did not.

      My aim is really to try to find the origins of one Jesse Oldham, a ge 21 in 1755, who is listed in Lloyd D. Bockstruck's Virginia's Colonial Soldier s. Some say he is the son of Richard Oldham and Elizabeth Basye, but I am missing the connecting link!!! That is, a document which links the two persons--Richard and a son [or nephew or cousin or whatever] named Jesse.

      Here are a few of my long-ago notes:

      Source for the military record is Lloyd D. Bockstruck, VIRGINIA'S COLONI AL SOLDIERS. This was during the French and Indian War. "Return of the Second Company of Rangers, commanded by Captain John Ashby, 21 Oct 1755," contain s the following information:

      7 Sept, Jesse Oldham, 5'8", dark, 21, Virginia, carpenter.

      (This entry indicates Jesse may have been born ca. 1734; therefor e, it is likely that this is the same person, born between 1730-1734. The original of these military rolls is in what is called at Virginia State Library, "Washington Papeery of Congress, Washington, DC. They are believed to pertain to the papers of Lawrence Washington, n ot "the father of our country," George. VA State Library has a facsimile cop y of these records, but will not allow them to be photocopied. They are negative, oversize copies. This age for Jesse Oldham, 21 years old, may be more correct than the date given in the later deposition in Fayette Co., KY.)

      In 1763, I find Jesse Oldham in Orange Co., NC and is a chain carrier for his father-in-law (whether actual or to-be) Richard Simpson, known to have be en from Fairfax Co., VA. Orange Co., NC is another one of those counties whose early records got destroyed--except a few court papers.

      Oh, well, back to the search!!!

      I am suspecting Jesse's service in the French & Indian War MAY have taken him to the Blue Ridge area, and, if any records exist, they probably are tuck ed away in some county like Augusta or Frederick Co. Oh, for more time to search the records!!!

      Thanks for your hints. More and more records (abstracts, of course) for Maryland are being published, and that is helpful.

      E.W.Wallace

      ***********************************************
      From: "Lucy DeYoung" Subject: Re: [MADKY] Whereabouts of Jesse Oldham the elder, who died ca 1814 Madison Co., KY
      To: Hello,
      Jesse Oldham married Elizabeth Simpson October 21, 1757. She was the daughter of Richard Simpson and Mary Kincheloe of Stafford County, Virginia. Her sister Sarah married Nathaniel Hart. The information I have shows that Jesse knew Daniel Boone in North Carolina and Jesse had moved to North Carolina before the Revolution, and lived for a time on the Yadkin River, not a great distance from the Guilford Court-House.

      "Jesse was married a long time before the war, and had a number of grown children, and several married ones, when he came to Kentucky from the Yadkin River with Colonel Daniel Boone, and was with Colonel Boone and Captain William Twetty at Twetty's Fort, or the Little Fort, were attacked by the Indians...."
      "It seems that after coming to Kentucky in the company of Colonel Daniel Boone, Jesse Oldham returned to North Carolina and he and one or two of his sons, enlisted in the Revolutionary Army in the North Carolina line. He and his son, and his brothers ... were all in the battle of Guilford Court House."
      Jesse Oldham came to Madison County, Ky., in the early part of the year 1775, with the company of Colonel Daniel Boone, ... and was with them when attacked by the Indians before daybreak, March 25, 1775 .... Jesse Oldham ... assisted in the building and completion of the Fort at Boonesborough, which work was not completed until June 14, 1775...." "... in 1775, in which year he raised on Ott Creek not far from the Fort, a crop of corn, among the first crops raised in Kentucky soil by white men, and returned to North Carolina, entered the army, and after the war brought his family to Boonesborough, and established his home near the fort, where he lived till his death in 1814.

      Jesse was born in Prince William County, Virginia about 1736. He was the son of Richard Oldham and Elizabeth Basye.
      He and his in-laws moved to Caswell County, North Carolina before the Revolutionary War.
      Elizabeth's aunt also named Elizabeth married James Halley. Their son John was also an early settler at Boonesborough along with his cousins the four Wilkerson boys who were the sons of Sarah Halley Wilkerson Haney. My line goes though James Wilkerson.
      I am doing a lot of research on the Simpson, Halley and Wilkerson families.
      I hope this helps.

      Lucy DeYoung
      lucydeyoung@isomedia.com
      _www.deyoungmaton.com_ (<http://www.deyoungmaton.com>)


      Dear Lucy and Other Interested Parties:

      I am going to challenge some of the statements given in the above e-mail.

      If you get angry when someone disagrees with your findings, you may not want to read the following. If you wish to learn, however, I suggest you go ahead--angry or not. Learning and re-learning is painful, I agree. I personally would like to know the family origins, probably in Virginia, of Jesse Oldham.

      There are many Oldhams in colonial Northern Virginia, but finding links among the various families is most difficult and seemingly insurmountable at this
      time. EWW

      Concerning the marriage date of Jesse Oldham and Elizabeth Simpson given above. I would dearly love to know the source of your information concerning
      this marriage. It is questionable whether Jesse Oldham was in North Carolina at that early date--the date given for the marriage.

      According to Lloyd D. Bockstruck's Virginia's Colonial Soldiers, in 1755 [French & Indian War], Jesse Oldham was with the second Virginia Rangers commanded by Captain John Ashby.

      Jesse Oldham may have migrated to North Carolina after his tour of duty in the 2nd Virginia Rangers 1755. Source for the military record is Lloyd D. Bockstruck, VIRGINIA'S COLONIAL SOLDIERS . "Return of the Second Company of Rangers, commanded by Captain John Ashby, 21 Oct 1755," contains the following
      information

      7 Sept, Jesse Oldham, 5'8", dark, 21, Virginia, carpenter.

      (This was for service in the French and Indian War. This entry indicates Jesse may have been born ca. 1734; therefore, it is likely that he is the same Jesse Oldham as in the cited Kentucky deposition--born between 1730 and 1734. Lloyd D. Bockstruck, the compiler of COLONIAL SOLIDERS OF VIRGINIA, states in the introduction of the chapter entitled "French and Indian War 1754-1763" that the papers of George Washington contain the bulk of the entries for the service cited in this chapter. The originals are the Library of Congress and microfilm copies are widely available, including at the Virginia State Library.)

      Back to your post: Where would the marriage of Jesse Oldham and Elizabeth Simpson have taken place? Jesse Oldham and Richard Simpson, his father-in-law, are found in records of Orange Co., NC, which was the parent county of Caswell Co., NC, formed 1777. We can verify from many records that both men (and their families) were later in Caswell Co. beginning 1777, the year it was formed.

      >From "August Term 1764, Orange County N.C. Court Minutes, 1762-1766, Book II

      [780] 223 ... Ordered that Richard Simpson, Alexander West, David Hart, John Powell, Elias Powell, Peter Noey, Michael Holt Junr, Nicholas Holt, Thomas Rich, John Robinson meet and Lay out a Road to the best & most Convenient way From Harts Road to Haw River Mill from thence to Jno. Powell;s & from thence to Lindley's Road leading to Cape Fare & Report their Proceedings to the next Court.

      (Weynette Parks Haun, ORANGE COUNTY, NOTH CAROLINA COURT MINUTES, 1762-1766, Book II [Durnahm NC: Published by author, 1992], p. 65)

      Back to the marriage date:v

      Records of marriages in colonial Virginia are difficult to find. I suspect the marriage of Oldham/Simpson, whatever the date, may have taken place in North Carolina, but the date may be debatable. Is there evidence of this marriage--secondary or primary, either in Virginia or in North Carolina?.

      Here are only a few notes about Richard Simpson, Sr., the father of Jesse Oldham's bride:

      Richard Simpson, the father of a good many daughters, is found in the records of Orange Co., NC beginning ca 1755 (tax list and court records) However, prior to that move to North Carolina Richard Simpson, who is called Jr., is found in Fairfax Co., VA records.. Fairfax Co. was formed Formed in 1742 from Prince William County. There are pertinent records in Stafford Co., VA, but I will not go into that now.

      Richard Simpson of colonial North Carolina is the son of Richard Simpson, Sr. of that Virginia county, as proved by a transcribed deed, cited below:

      Fairfax Co. DB A-355-356: Indenture 18th April 1745 between Richard Simpson of Truro Parish in county of Fairfax & Richard Simpson, Junr & Mary, his wife, son of said Richard Simpson of other part .. in consideration of natural love & affection which he has & beareth unto said Richard Simpson and Mary, his wife, as also for better maintenance & preferment .. hath given .. all that tract or parcel of land with the appurtenances containing 300 acres .. on branches of Wolf run & the branches of popes head run .. corner to land of John Waugh .. to land surveyed for Thomas Ford .. corner to land surveyed for Gles Tillett .. Richard Simson. No witnesses shown. Deed of Gift recorded 16th April 1745

      (Ruth & Sam Sparacio, DEED ABSTRACTS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA (1742-1750) [McLean, VA: Privately published, 1986], p. 36).

      Jesse Oldham, on the other hand, is not readily found in the records of North Carolina until about 1763 when he is a chain carrier for his [assumed] brother, James Oldham.

      Here is a brief reference to a land entry by his probable brother. SCC is sworn chain carrier.

      Jesse's first [discovered by me, that is] documented appearance in North Carolina is 1763; cited land record is given below. It is highly doubtful Jesse was ever in Yadkin country. If you find that is true, will you share your sources?

      "Oldham, James, Warrant, 1 Feb 1763, 700 acres on Piney Br., Haw R., includes Thos. Church's improvements. Surveyed 29 Apr 1763."

      "Oldham, James - survey - 29 Apr 1763; 180 acres on north side Haw R., joins Robt. Wells; Robt. Wells, JESSEY OLDHAM: SCC. 2 copies."

      (William D. Bennett, ORANGE COUNTY RECORDS, VOLUME I; GRANVILLE PROPRIETARY LAND OFFICE, ABSTRACTS OF LOOSE PAPERS [privately published, Raleigh, NC: 1987], p. 52 and p. 54)

      Haw River does not appear in The North Carolina Gazetteer by William S. Powell, but Haw Creek does.

      "Haw Creek rises in w Orange County and flows sw into Alamance County where it enters Haw River. ...."

      If you do have evidence of Jesse Oldham (or any of his brothers) being in the proximity of Yadkin River, I would be most pleased if you would share that source with us. (I am descended from George Boone, a brother of Daniel Boone.)

      I will not comment on other statements in your post, but if you have some sources which will bear out your statements, will you kindly share with those who descend from this North Carolina Oldham family?

      By the way, the section on the Oldhams in the book compiled by William Harris Miller of Madison co., KY is very flawed and should not be used as a source
      unless there is some corroborating evidence. He has mixed up two distinct Oldham families. One family of the Louisville KY area (Conway, et al) were said to have migrated directly from Virginia. On the other hand, Jesse Oldham and his brothers and extended family probably came from Northern Neck Virginia but went to North Carolina before coming to Kentucky.

      Thanks for any guidance you can give/impart to those of descended from the North Carolina-Madison Co. branch of Oldhams.

      E.W.Wallace
      descendant of Jesse's son, Richard *Ready-Money* Oldham
      and his first wife, Ursala Duke Williams (the widow of Reuben Peoples of Caswell Co., NC)
      ************************************************************************
      is a reference to a deposition quoted in a book:
      In a Kentucky deposition given by Jesse Oldham on 3 March 1802 in Madison Co.. KY "taken at an improvement of Nathaniel Hart, deceased," he, Jesse, stated he was "aged 72 years" (p. 668 of Fayette Co., VA [now Kentucky] Records.)
      He stated that he came to Kentucky from North Carolina in the year 1775....
      In the year 1775 he, together with Nathaniel Hart [his brother-in-law, both married to Simpson sisters] and others planted a crop of corn at Boonesborough. He came out to Kentucky again in the spring of 1779 at which time he together with Nathaniel Hart and others made his choice at the mouth of the branch or near that leads up towards Twitty's fort..."
      (Michael & Bettie Cook, FAYETTE CO., KY RECORDS, V. I [Evansville, IN: Cook Publications], 1985, p. 187-188) [LAPL Gen R 976.91, F28CO, V. I]).
      If you know anything about Richard Henderson and his land speculations, he was aiming to set up a proprietorship of vast areas of Kentucky--and also Tennessee, as I understand it. The American Revolution dashed his hopes.
      Nathaniel Hart was one of the eight proprietors. Henderson had hired Daniel Boone to set up the trail--or guide the interested parties--to Boonesborough.
      There are so many more details of Boonesborough that I highly recommend an oldish book called Boonesborough by George W. Ranck. The appendices are especially interesting to some of us genealogists. Should you have access to the online genealogical database called HeritageQuest [subscriptions are by libraries and some societies only--not to individuals] there is a digitized version of said book. It was originally published by the Filson Club, Louisville, KY and may be available on interlibrary loan--or possibly at a local college or University. Possibly the Family History Library has filmed it.
      I have done most of my research in books and films and not the internet, but some of these sources may now be on the internet--such as the book Boonesborough.
      Happy hunting!
      E.W.Wallace
      ***************************************************************

      from EVELYN WALLACE hdanw@verizon.net
      to oldham.jan@gmail.com
      date Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 5:44 PM
      subject Jesse Oldham - DAR correction

      You probably have been notified of this change--long ago. did not note date. Oh, I found the accompanying letter--from Winifred Jacob, an Oldham cousin (blind) now deceased. Her letter was dated Oct 25, 1997.

      Evelyn W. Wallace


      In the 2000's the name Jesse Oldham appeared in the Corrections column of the DAR Magazine, Feb issue, p. 117, date not stated. The indication is that his Revolutionary patriotic service was in North Carolina and Virginia and not in Kentucky. That is because Kentucky did not become a separate State until 1792.


      "Oldham, Jesse, b. ca 1713 d 1814 m Elizabeth Simpson PS KY Correct service PS NC VA"

      http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/11328640/person/12455672791/media/4?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid%7cpgNum

      Jesse Oldham came to Madison County, KY in 1775 with Colonel Daniel Boone and Captain William Twetty. March 25th, 1775, he was with them when they were attacked by the natives. Captain William Twetty was mortally wounded. A Felix Walker was wounded, but recovered and was able to file a deposition in the Court stating that ?Twetty?s Fort, or the little fort, was built March 26, 1775, about five miles from Richmond (and 132 feet over one mile south west from Estill?s old station in Madison, County, KY), on a small branch of Taylor?s Fork. That it was built the day after the Indian attack before the break of day, upon Colonel Boone?s and Captain Twetty?s company, about 100 yards from Boone?s Trace, in square form, about six or seven feet high, of logs, as a protection against surprises, or sudden attacks of the natives, was not covered, and the wounded bodies of Captain Twetty and his ward, young Felix Walker, were removed into it, and there nursed. On the second day after it was built Captain Twetty who was shot in both knees, died, and was buried in the fort. And the company remained to nurse Walker, until April 1, 1885.

      Jesse Oldham, April 6, 1775, helped build the fort at Boonesborough, Madison County, KY. He also raised one of the first corn crops at Boonesborough. He then returned to North Carolina and joined the Revolutionary Army in the North Carolina Line with two of his sons, his brothers Captain John Oldham, Richard, Conway, James, and Moses and Major George Oldham, the latter of Lee?s Legion, were all in the battle of Guilford Court House.


      cKYgen (View posts) Posted: 29 Jul 2012 3:15PM GMT
      Classification: Biography
      Edited: 29 Jul 2012 4:21PM GMT
      Surnames: Oldham
      Jesse Oldham, pioneer at Fort Boonesborough in 1775.
      Tyree Oldham, son of Jesse Oldham, was also an early pioneer at Ft. Boonesborough.

      Reference for Tynee Oldham, son of Jesse Oldham.
      1 - List of names from court depositions in Madison Co., KY court house, 1801-1806.

      References for Jesse Oldham:
      2 - French Tipton papers at Townsend Room, Eastern KY Univ.
      This is a list of Revolutionary War soldiers.
      5 - Article written by Judge William Chenault, published in the Courier-Journal.
      7 - Col. Richardson Henderson?s journal.
      8 - Drapers papers - Association of Settlers for making a crop of corn.
      Draper Manuscript - MSS 29 CC 59
      Association of the Settlers of Boonesboro; in 1779, for making a crop of corn

      Wheras, we the subscribers being willing and desirous of making a crop of corn at the station of Boonesborough, on the Kentucky, do think it essentially necessary for our own safety and the public good, to enter into rules that may be obligatory on each subscriber, and are as follows:

      1st. That three men (towit) Nathaniel Hart, George Madden, and Robert Cartwright, be and herby appointed as overseers or directors to said company

      2nd That ever subscriber shall immediately enrole his name on a list prepared for that
      purpose, and shall every morning appear at the beat of a drum or some other notice given, and receive such order as the overseers or directors shall think convenient to give.

      3rd That if any man refuse or neglect to perform such tours of duty as shall be assigned him by the overseers or directors he shall be erased out of the list, shall forfeit all pretensions to any claim in such crop.

      4th That every morning two or more men be sent out as spies, to range round the grounds and fields to be cultivated by us, and that such number be thought necessary be stationed as a guard, the whole day, or to be relieved by others as occasion requires.

      5th That no man be allowed to absent himself from the company on any pretense whatsoever, either hunting horses or provisions, or any other occasion, without leave of the overseers first had.

      6th That the managers and overseers shall have full powers and authority to determine all unforseen disputes whatever, and that the subscribers shall be obliged to abide thereby. In testimony whereof, we have hereunto set our hands this 15th of April, 1779.

      Nathaniel Hart, Robert Cartwright, Edward Williams, William Hall, Thomas Hall,
      John Harper, Beal Kelly, Peter Harper, Jesse Oldham, James Anthony, George Madden, Nicholas Anderson, Jesse Peake, Edward Hall, William Johnson, John Kelley, Benjamin White, Whitson George, and John Cartwright. (end quote)

      ?Kentucky, A History of the State? W.H. Perin, J.H. Battle, & G.C. Kniffin, published in 1885: Based on the biographical sketch of Sandford Oldham.
      Jesse Oldham was born in Guilford Co., NC & married Miss Simpson of NC. They had six sons & four daughters.
      Sons: Richard, Tyrie, Jesse, Elias, Nathaniel, & John Oldham.

      Some of Jesse Oldham?s sons served in the Revolutionary War. This would have been Pvt. Richard OIdham and Capt. John Oldham.

      Capt. John Oldham was in the Revolutionary War battles of Cowpens and Guilford Courthouse.

      The Oldham family were said to be Welsh and of the Baptist faith.
    Person ID I2353   oldham
    Last Modified 28 Feb 2017 

    DNA Tests  Y-DNA-269553 OLDHAM, Richard

    Father OLDHAM, Richard,   b. 1705-1711, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1785, Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother BAYSE, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1715, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F833  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Mother OLDHAM, Caswell County 
    Family ID F834  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family OLDHAM, Jesse,   b. 1733-1736, Prince William County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Apr 1814, Otter Creek, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 21 Oct 1757  Orange County, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, Mary Ann,   b. Yes, date unknown
     2. OLDHAM, Amy,   b. Between 1761 and 1762
     3. OLDHAM, Richard Ready Money,   b. 4 May 1763, Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jun 1836, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     4. OLDHAM, George,   b. Abt 1765,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. OLDHAM, Tyre,   b. Abt 1768, Orange County, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1851, Grant County, Wisconsin, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 83 years)
     6. OLDHAM, Anna,   b. 1773, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. OLDHAM, Jesse,   b. Abt 1777, St. Stephen's Parish, Northumberland County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1850, Estill Springs, Franklin County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 74 years)
     8. OLDHAM, Elias Sr,   b. 1779, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 2 Sep 1850, Barry, Clay County, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     9. OLDHAM, Frances Frankie,   b. Abt 1780,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. OLDHAM, Edith Ede,   b. 15 Mar 1781, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jun 1836, Estill County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years)
     11. OLDHAM, Sarah Sally,   b. Abt 1783,   d. Yes, date unknown
     12. OLDHAM, John Kincheloe,   b. Abt 1788, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     13. OLDHAM, Nathaniel M.,   b. 8 Dec 1788, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1858, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F982  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1733-1736 - Prince William County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 21 Oct 1757 - Orange County, North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1810 - Madison County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHonors - - Boonesborough, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWill - Apr 1814 - Madison County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Apr 1814 - Otter Creek, Madison County, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War<br>
Grave Marker
    Daughters of the Revolutionary War
    Grave Marker


  • Sources 
    1. [S248] Lee Hoffman.

    2. [S3077] Todd G. Oldham.

    3. [S267] WFT#3967 Vol 1DAR Index Centennial Edition Part2.

    4. [S1224] Pat Searight.

    5. [S364] Histories and Genealogies of the Families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh and Brown, Wm. Miller, (http://www.archive.org/details/historygenealogie00mill), 479 (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S2581] WFT #5127 Vol 1.