Oldham Family History

OLDHAM,  Major George

OLDHAM, Major George

Male 1750 - 1840  (90 years)

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  • Name OLDHAM, George 
    Prefix Major 
    Born 1750  Prince William County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Land Mar 1803  Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Military Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 31 Mar 1840  Barnwell District, Anderson County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Buried On His Plantation Not Far From His Residence Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Notes 
    • Timeline:
      1776, Winter; Volunteer Rev. War, Ensign under Garrett Moore, Caswell Co, NC
      1777 June 4; Caswell County, North Carolina commission from governor appointing him lieutenant
      1777; Revolutionary War ? promoted to Lieutenant, Caswell County, NC
      1778, May 25, 638 acres on Stoney Creek and Turkey Pen Branch, Caswell County, North Carolina
      1778, Nov 20; 150 acres on Country Line Creek, North Carolina
      1779, Mar 03; 639 acres on County Line Creek, Caswell Co, NC, Richard Oldham Chain Carrier
      (1972 p 33-cvj) commission in militia account of US with North Carolina Rev. Bk C, pp 62 and 63
      1780-1782 Tax lists of St. David's District, Caswell County, North Carolina
      1780, Mar; Revolutionary War ? promoted to Captain
      1782, Mar 5; called as juror Caswell County, North Carolina
      1782, Oct 29; sold to George Sims 200 acres on Crooked Branch of Country Line Creek
      1783, May 01; Revolutionary War ? promoted to Major
      1783, Sept; jury duty in Caswell County, North Carolina
      1783, Oct 13; 150 acres on Country Line Creek adjacent his own line
      1783, Oct 13; sold to David Hart 640 acres on Country Line Crk adj his SE corner, bank of Rocky Branch
      1784-1786 Tax Lists of St. David's District, Caswell County, North Carolina
      1786 Census of St. David's District, listed as Major George OLDHAM
      1787, July 16; sold to John Williams 150 acres in Caswell County, North Carolina
      1788, Oct 21; sold 600 acres on Stoney Creek and Turkey Pen Br, Caswell Co, N C from grant of 1779
      1788, Nov 16; witness sale of slave from John Rice to Thomas Rice
      1790 census Pendleton District South Carolina : 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, 5 females -(3/97 must be missing children in list, known children do not equal census record.)
      1791, January; purchased land on branches of Rocky River, Pendleton District, South Carolina
      1792, Jun 25; 170 Acres Broadway & Pea Creek, Anderson Dist., South Carolina
      1800 Census; Pendleton District, South Carolina
      1807, Jun 16; First Major of Caswell Co Regiment of Militia. Virginia Grant for 2666 2/3 acres, North Carolina pension #S21906 Natl DAR 234359
      1810 Census; Pendleton District, South Carolina
      1820 Census; Pendleton District, South Carolina / 1 m 26- 45, 1 45 & over, 2 f 26-45, 1 f over 45
      1830 Census; Lancaster, South Carolina
      1833, Mar 04; Appeared for pension deposition Revolutionary War
      1840 Death in Pendleton, Anderson Dist, South Carolina
      1840, Apr 06; Will Recorded, Anderson Dist, South Carolina
      1852, Jan 30; In Pickens Dist, SC Children file for increase in pension or bounty land

      History and genealogies of the families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh, and Brown (illustrated) pg. 470
      Some sources list county of birth in Virginia as Fauquier rather than Prince William. Deathplace of Anderson District is sometimes listed as being in Barnwell County - need to check.
      George Oldham, who was a Major in the Revolutionary War, is listed in the following Deed Books of Caswell County, North Carolina:
      Book A, p. 247--State of North Carolina #73--639 acres on Stoney Creek and Turkey Pen Branch of Country Line Creek, adjacent to Roger Atkinson's old line, claims of George Sims and David Hart; 3 March 1779; chain carriers: George Sims, Richard Oldham.
      Book B, p. 90--State of North Carolina #229--to George Sims 200 acres on Crooked Branch of Country Line Creek adjacent David Hart, George Oldham, William Campbell. 29 October 1782.
      Book B, p. 220--State of North Carolina #488--to George Oldham 150 acres on Country Line Creek adjacent his own line, 13 October 1783.
      Book B, p. 265--State of North Carolina #609--to David Hart 640 acres on Country Line Creek adjacent his SE corner, bank of Rocky Branch, Edward Haggard, George Oldham; 13 October 1783.
      Book B, p. 384-5--Robert Sorrell to John Williams for 66 lbs. 385 acres on Stoney Creek adjacent Roger Atkinson, George Oldham, Jeremiah Williamson, Nathaniel Reed; 24 November 1783. Witnessed: John Spencer, David Burton.
      Book D, p. 383-4--To John Williams 222 acres head of Rocky Branch of Stoney Creek adjacent Jeremiah Williamson, Nokes & Sorrell corner, George Oldham, David Hart, Haggard; 18 August 1787.
      Book E, p. 173--George Oldham to John Williams for 50 lbs. 150 acres on Country Line Creek, adjacent Abner Powell, Williams' line, tract Oldham was granted by state; 16 July 1787.
      Book F, p. 23-4--George Oldham to William Brintle of Warren County, North Carolina, for 100 lbs. 638 acres on Stoney Creek and Turkey Pen Branch, a water of County Line creek, adjacent Roger Atkinson, George Sims, David Hart, said land Oldham obtained 3 March 1779 by grant. 21 October 1788; Witnessed: George Sims, Abner Powell, Cudboth King, Dudley Ballard.
      Book F, p. 41-2--William Brintle of Warren County, North Carolina, to Cuthbart King of Caswell County for 60 lbs. 119 acres on Country Line Creek, adjacent David Hart, William Campbell, being part of grant obtained by George Oldham 3 March 1779. 21 October 1788. Witnessed: Abner Powell, Dudley Ballard.
      Book H, p. 94--John Rice to Thomas Rice, for full consideration, one Negro girl Easter, 15 years old. 16 November 1788; Witnessed: William H. Rice, Geo. Oldham.
      Book N, p. 5-6--William Brintle to George Sims, Sr. for 80 lbs. 79 acres on Country Line Creek, adjacent Cudbert King, Hart, being part of tract granted to George Oldham by State. 25 May 1797. Witnessed: Owen Ballard, William Brintle.
      Book N, p. 28-9--Cudburth Kind to George Sims, Sr. for 100 lbs. 34.75 acres on N Country Line Creek adjacent to Abner Powell, being part of grant to George Oldham by State; 13 April 1799. Witnessed: John Hastings, William Brintle.
      Book Q--p. 95-6--Power of Attorney--Moses Oldham of Montgomery County, Tennessee, husband of Mary Oldham, dec'd. sister of John Rice, dec'd, late of Tennessee; George Oldham, Jesse Oldham, Moses Oldham, Joel Oldham, Sally (Sarah) Brantley and her husband Abram Brantley; Conaway Oldham and Elisha Oldham by their father Moses Oldham--to trusty friend Solomon Debow of Caswell County to make choice of parcels of land in Tennessee devised them by last will of John Rice, dec'd. containing 5000 acres by will to be equally divided between his executors and his brothers, to sue for or to compromise. 9 November 1805. Witnessed: Roland Peterson, Peter Powel, H. Harelson. (This appears to be a different George Oldham, a son of Moses Oldham of Montgomery County, TN)
      1790 Pendleton District South Carolina Federal Census: 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, 5 females -(3/97 must be missing children in list, known children do not equal census record.)
      Anderson Dist., South Carolina Deeds: George grantor Robt Pickens B-95 Jun 25, 1792 170A-Broadway & Pea Creek
      1820 Federal Census Pendleton District, South Carolina: pg 204/ 1 male 26- 45, 1 male 45 and over, 2 females 26-45, 1 female over 45

      Marriage and Death Notices From the Up-Country of South Carolina as taken from Greenville newspapers 1826 - 1863 compiled by Brent H. Holcomb, C. A. L. S.
      Died in Anderson District on the 31st of March last, Maj. George Oldham, in the 91st year of his age, after a long and severe illness. The deceased was a long tired veteran of the Revolution, who stood the shock of many a hard-fought battle,ef the rights and liberty of his country. His military career, as a soldier and commander, was distinguished by his courage and patriotism. Brave, but generous, reverenced by his soldiers, and beloved by his country, when freed from public service he retired to his farm.? He lived the life of a patriot and died a saint (ibid.).
      1777, Caswell County, North Carolina:
      On the Caswell County website it states that shortly after the county was formed in 1777 that George Oldham was recognized as Lieutenant.
      "The first commercial act by the Court was to grant ?leave" to John Riley to build a mill on Country Line Creek. The first military action was to acknowledge the commission from the North Carolina Governor produced by John Graves, appointing him Captain. This was Captain John Herndon Graves. The Court also recognized that James Saunders had been appointed Colonel by the North Carolina Governor. And, Thomas Neely was recognized as Ensign; George Oldham was recognized as Lieutenant; Major Lea was recognized as Lieutenant [thus becoming Lieutenant Major Lea, which must have caused some confusion]; and Samuel Johnston was recognized as Lieutenant."




      Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements
      Pension Application of George Oldham: S21906
      Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris
      The State of South Carolina} SS.
      Anderson District} On this fourth day of March 1833 personally appeared in open Court before the Honorable Josiah J. Evans of the Court of General Sessions & Common
      Pleas, now sitting Major George Oldham a resident in the District of Anderson and State aforesaid, aged Eighty three years, who being first duly sworn according to Law doth, on his Oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed
      June 7 1832. That he entered the service th of the United States under the following named officers, and served as herein stated ?He volunteered under Capt. Mat. Jouett of Col William Moore's Reg't of North Carolina Militia went down to Capefear [sic: Cape Fear] (from Caswell County) against the Scotch Tories commanded by Col. McLeod [Col. Donald McLeod under Gen. Donald McDonald], before they got down Gen?l [Richard] Caswell had defeated McLeod at
      Capefear [Battle of Moore?' Creek Bridge, 27 Feb 1776] this was the first Battle in that part of the State, and He met the defeated Tories, and took away many prisoners who were paroled & sent home. He believes that he went down in the fall or winter of 1776 he was elected Ensign
      While out and on his return home was Commissioned Ensign of Capt. Matthew Jouetts Company of Militia in the Caswell Regiment. He was out about two months at this time. In March 1780 he was Elected Captain of a Company of the Caswell Regiment and was drafted to go a tour of three month, after they got into South Carolina they went under [Lt. Col.] Stephen Moore and marched into South Carolina where they joined General [Horatio] Gates near Lynchs Creek and was at Gates defeat at Camden [Battle of Camden, 16 Aug 1780] he was stationed at Rugeleys Mill & was marched to attack the British He was put in the front which made & received the attack. After the defeat he went or was ordered back to Pedee [sic: Pee Dee River] where Gen?l. Stephens [Edward Stevens of the VA Militia] had left his Baggage &c. & joined them & after that they all went home & Gen'l. [John] Butler sent for him to be at Hillsboro [sic: Hillsborough NC] & to get all the men in Caswell to meet there he did so & out of the Ten Companies in Caswell County only one could Captains Command could be mustered, and the command of that Company was given to him. He was then sent home for twenty days at the end of that time he was again called to make up the time which had not expired in S.[?] Carolina being forty days ? which when completed amounted to about five months. After the Battle at Kings Mountain [7 Oct 1780] Gen'l. [Nathanael] Greene was retreating through N. Carolina. He Green lay at His (Capt. Oldham's) muster ground On his return home he was out at the C. H. [court house] reviewing or making a draft to relieve the old drafts his wife informed him the British was at his muster ground, He started that night & followed Greene to Dan River he Greene had got on the Virginia side [14 Feb 1781] Col. Moore met him there and agreed to meet at his Oldham's house & on the day they met The British was at Hillsboro. They Col. Moore & (Capt. Oldham) got about 30 or 40 men & agreed to go to Hillsboro & see what could be done. There they met Col. [Andrew]
      Pickens, Col. [Henry] Lee of Cavalry. They joined & followed on the trail of the enemy commanded by Tarleton [Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton, under Cornwallis] & his forces. They overtook the enemy in Orange [now Alamance] County near Haw River & had a skirmish called Pyles hacking match where the enemy was defeated [25 Feb 1781]. He was afterwards in the service nearly all the time to the end of the war but was in no other engagement. He was promoted to the Command of the first Battalion of the Caswell Regiment of the Militia of North Carolina and commissioned on the 1st May 1783. He hereby relinquishes, every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension Roll of the agency of any State. That he was Two Years at Least, in the Service of the United States as a Captain during the Revolutionary war.
      [signed] George Oldham
      The State of South Carolina

      Personally appeared before me the undersigned, a Justice of the Peace for the District of Anderson & State aforesaid, Major George Oldham and made Oath to amend his application for a pension, who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith, That by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory, he cannot swear positively as to the precise length of his services, but according to the best of his recollection, he served not less than the periods mentioned below and in the following grades
      As Sergeant a volunteer in the Year 1777 not less than Twenty days. As Ensign in the same year not less than twenty days
      As Captain when he went into the State of South Carolina at Gates Defeat in 1780 (as he believes) not less than Three months & twenty days} 3. . 20
      As captain in the State of North Carolina under Col. William Moore not less that forty days
      Afterwards about 1781 as well as he can now recollect he was out Twenty days as Captain at the time he was at Pyles Hacking match.
      In all he served 5 months & twenty days as Captain 5. mo. 20 days
      As Ensign twenty days 20 days
      As Sergeant twenty days 20 do
      Total 7 months
      This deponent further saith that he was at various times called upon as captain to do many things for his country & prevented from following any civil pursuit & was dependent on his wife for the support of himself & family. But he would prefer to die in need, than to Swear falsely.
      Sworn to 5th July 1833 [signed] George Oldham
      Before John Harker JP
      First Major of Caswell Co Regiment of Militia. 16 Jun 1807, Virginia Grant for 2666 2/3 acres, North Carolina pension #S21906 Natl DAR 234359 Could this be a different George Oldham?

      Will recorded, Will Book B, Page 100 6 April 1840 (Roll No. 520), Anderson District, South Carolina: He bequeathed 263 acres to his wife Susannah. To his son Thomas, he left one bed and furniture and one cow and calf; to his daughter Nancy, he left one bed and furniture; to his son William, one hundred acres of land and all the remaining stock; to his sons Thomas and Garland the balance of the land (163 acres).
      In Pickens District SC on 30 Jan 1852 ?Thomas Oldham, William Oldham and Nelson Guttry & wife Mary Guttry formerly Mary Oldham of the District of Anderson and State aforesaid, children and heirs of George Oldham dec'd who formerly resided in the same District and State appointed an attorney to try to obtain an increase in pension or bounty land

      Pat Searight Notes: Was in Lee's Legion. Was in Caswell County, North Carolina 1777. He and brother Richard were in Fauquier County, Virginia 1793. Samuel Pepper was also there 1774. He was the only sibling who did not go to Kentucky. He was granted nearly 3000 acres as a veteran. Was in Battle of Guilford Courthouse. Susannah: Could her name be Morris?
      Wm Miller Addendum "Not long since it has been made clear to our mind that the brothers Major George Oldham, Captain John Oldham, Richard Oldham and James Oldham instead of going to Barnwell District as initimated in the originial volume, went from North Carolina to Pendleton District and settled in Anderson County where Major George Oldham remained till his death, and was buried on his plantation not far from his residence, and James Oldham probably remained in South Carolina also; Captain John Oldham and Richard Oldham owned lands in Anderson County, South Carolina, which they disposed of and moved to Madison County, Kentucky about 1795."
      Mrs. Lillian H. Tribble of Simpsonville, South Carolina, under date of March 4, 1923, writes:
      "I remember that my grandfather Harper, told me years ago that his grandfather was Major George Oldham, a Revolutionary Soldier. My grandfather Harper, has been dead twenty years, and it is my great regret that I did not get more informats family to die and was eighty five at his death. There are no Oldham of the name (that I know of) living in this State; and it was only after several months of investigation that I found the last one of the family (born Oldham) living in this State. I found her by tracing land records. She is a Mrs. Garrett, and lives on the old place where Major George Oldham died - Anderson County - . He and his wife and two sons are buried near there in unmarked graves. The old Grave Yard grown up in trees, but Mrs. Garrett knows the graves and located them for me. When I can get the people to clear off the grave yard, I intend to mark the graves with name and record.
      "Mrs. Garrett has lots of old letters a hundred years old, some are over, and I have secured information from them about his wife's people and of his children.
      "He married Susannah Henseley, (he then) of Caswell County and Maysfield or Maisfield Henesley was her father. I have letters from her brother which speaks of will and he also mentions the Rices.
      "I have Major George Oldham's record from pension office, he enlisted from Caswell County, North Carolina, first as Ensign and was rapidly promoted to Major. He served throughout the war.
      "I find from census 1790, he was in Pendleton District, South Carolina, I do not think he ever went to Barnwell; but I am going to find out. I have no record, so far, of Major George's brothers and sisters. ... .I heard old Mrs. Garrettdett; but she knows nothing of any others. I also have always heard that some of the Pepper Family of Anderson county, South Carolina, were our relatives; so you see from your records, I have a good deal more to go on. . . .
      "Major George Oldham had sons; William, George, Thomas, Garland, (I see that also was a family name) and several other children.
      "I can't give you information now, I am away from home, and have not my notebooks with me. My great grandfather, John Harper, married Major George Oldham's daughter, Martha (Oldham). They lived in Anderson County, and died there. Severa;arland was a Cumberland Presbyterian preacher, also some of his sons.
      "I have not yet been able to get in communication with their descendants; as I have been trying to get information of early Oldham ancestors. I am corresponding with some North Carolina branches of the family; and hope to get information

      "Some of them have the idea that three brothers originally settled in this country. A Mr. Cole from Chatham County, (a very old man) writes me; his great great grandfather was John Oldham, an Ensign in the Navy during the Revolution; th
      d heard he went from Caswell County and settled in Chatham County, on land granted him for his services. I will write you later when I go home and give you what information I have now, and I shall endeavor at once to find Alabama relatives and get information.
      "Several years ago there was an Oldham family living in Greenwood, South Carolina. They moved to Southern Alabama, I found their address and wrote to them. The father, John Oldham, was dead, but a daughter wrote me he was from Kentuckrd in Greenwood to rest on his way home. He married a Miss Marryman there and settled. She knew little of the family; but gave me some Kentucky names to whom to write. The ones to whom I wrote had very little information. She also had heard of the three brothers - original settlers.
      "This old lady, Mrs. Garrett, has quite a lot of relics of Revolutionary times. She has the Snuff box Major George Oldham carried through the Revolutionary War; has spectacles of his; and numerous other articles.
      "Later - March 18, 1923, Mrs. Lillie H. Tribble, writes from Seneca, South Carolina:
      "I will give you the information that I have at present - though my data is very incomplete right now.
      "Just two days ago I received my first communication from the Oldham descendants in Alabama, I have been trying for several months to find some of them, and I have heard from a Mrs. Riley, who is a granddaughter of Major George Oldheond information she can get of the Alabama Branches."
      "Children of Major George Oldham and wife, Susannah Hensley:
      1 Nancy Oldham born March 20, 1776, married Isaac Elrod - no children
      2 John Oldham born August 3, 1777, died September 15, 1831, married Elizabeth Orr. Several Children born to them
      3 Martha Snead Oldham born 15 May 1779. died September 1 1849, married John Harper (My great grand parents)
      4 George Oldham Jr, born February 26, 1781 married Henrietta _ _ _ _ _ _ _
      5 Polly Oldham, born March 26, 1783. married Nelson Guthrie. No children
      6 Zelpha Oldham born April 3, 1785, died December 15, 1860. married Obediah Merrett. Two daughters
      7 William Oldham born 26 Jan 1788 died July 15 1870 single
      8 Thomas Oldham born February 17, 1792 died January 23, 1875 married _____ ____ one son
      9 Garland Oldham born Jun 13, 1795 died ??? ?? 1841, married Nancy ?? ???? Several Children. He was the Cumberland Presbyterian preacher.
      "Susannah Hensley, the wife of Major George Oldham, was the daughter of Macksfield or Maisfield Hensley and Martha Snead. They lived in Caswell County, North Carolina.
      "I hope to get the records of John, George Jr and Garland, or Alabama "
      "I have copies of Oldham land records from Clerk of Court, Anderson County and I find in 1792 a Richard Oldham bought 790 acres of land; he sold it out in two or three years. Census of 1790 gives a Richard Oldham with seven males and. Ad John Oldham, each with several in family.
      "Major George Oldham's brothers must have come to South Carolina before they went to Kentucky; they could not have been Major George Oldham's sons."
      "Evidently Mrs. Lillie H. Tribble is correct in her conclusion that Major George Oldham's brothers must have gone to South Carolina before they departed for Kentucky; for the said Richard, James and John were certainly brothers and alsoe

      "These facts came to hand long since the book was published as then we did not know"

      received from Mrs. Paul T. Russell, 530 3rd Ave., Albany, Georgia 31705. She read it in her mother's bible.
      George Oldham volunteered in the Revolutionary Army in the Winter of 1776 as Ensign under Garrett Moore from Pickens, Caswell County, North Carolina. In March 1780 he was made Captain , and 1st May 1783 promoted to Major. He was released from th
      e army in 1783 as a Major. (Entered service in North Carolina, now lives in Anderson District South Carolina)
      4 March 1833 George Oldham, aged eighty three, resident of Anderson District South Carolina appeared before the court in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7 1832. He volunteered under Capt. Matthew Janett of Col William Moore's regiment of North Carolina militia. Went down to Cape Fear (from Caswell County) against the Scotch forces commanded by
      He is listed in the North Carolina State Census in 1777 & 1786 in St. Davids District, Caswell County.
      On the Caswell County website it states that shortly after the county was formed in 1777 that George Oldham was recognized as Lieutenant.
      "The first commercial act by the Court was to grant ?leave" to John Riley to build a mill on Country Line Creek. The first military action was to acknowledge the commission from the North Carolina Governor produced by John Graves, appointing him Captain. This was Captain John Herndon Graves. The Court also recognized that James Saunders had been appointed Colonel by the North Carolina Governor. And, Thomas Neely was recognized as Ensign; George Oldham was recognized as Lieutenant; Major Lea was recognized as Lieutenant [thus becoming Lieutenant Major Lea, which must have caused some confusion]; and Samuel Johnston was recognized as Lieutenant."
      Three of his children: William, Thomas and Mary were residing in Pickens County, S.C. in 1840 when Major George Oldham died.

      Revolutionary War
      Series: M805 Roll: 621 Image: 547 File: S21906

      Tho's OIdham, Lawful Heir & Exe'c, of George Oldham Revolutionary Pension of the United States
      27 Feb 1857 Anderson District South Carolina

      Three of his children: William, Thomas and Mary were residing in Pickens County, S.C. in 1840 when Major George Oldham died.
      His will was proved at Anderson District, South Carolina 06 Apr 1840
      He bequeathed 263 acres to his wife Susanah.
      To his son Thomas, he left one bed and furniture and one cow and calf
      To his daughter Nancy, he left one bed and furniture
      To his son William, one hundred acres of land and all the remaining stock
      To his sons Thomas and Garland the balance of the land (163 acres).

      The will was recorded in Will Book B,. page 100 recorded April 6, 1840, Roll No. 520
      (I need to check and see if Will Book B is on either of these microfilms:
      Vol. 1 1840-184 5 - FHL US/CAN Film [ 22865 ]
      Wills, Anderson County, 1791-1857 - FHL US/CAN Film [ 22858 ]
      Index to estate records Anderson, 1780-1972 - FHL US/CAN Film [ 1025488 ]

      1852 In Pickens District SC on 30 Jan?Thomas Oldham, William Oldham and Nelson Guttry & wife Mary Guttry formerly Mary Oldham of the District of Anderson and State aforesaid, children and heirs of George Oldham dec'd who formerly resided in the same District and State appointed an attorney to try to obtain an increase in pension or bounty land

      from Hdanw@aol.com
      to OLDHAM-L@rootsweb.com
      ccNCCASWEL-L@rootsweb.com,
      date Sun, Aug 12, 2007 at 2:55 PM
      subject[OLDHAM] George Oldham - Land Grant - 1779 - Caswell Co. NC

      It is believed George Oldham, associated with Jesee Oldham and others of later Madison Co., KY, also migrated to Madison Co. KY. According to the rules of DAR, those acquiring land in North Carolina during the Revolution had to take an oath of allegiance to the new Revolutionary government [of North Carolina]. Therefore, according to the rules, this qualifies the direct descendants of that person to eligibility for DAR. Of course, the lengthy application papers must be completed, linking one generation to the preceding and/or succeeding one.
      E.W.Wallace
      Caswell County
      State of North Carolina to (Richard Caswell, Governor) (James Glasgow, Secretary of State)
      Grant Book 35
      p. 73 George Oldham 3 March 1779 638 acres on the Waters of Stoney Creek and on both sides of Turkey Pen Branch (which is) a Water of Country Line Creek joining Roger Atkinsons old Line, both sides of a branch of Stoney Creek, George Simms, David Hart, Vacant Land, and both sides of some Branches.
      (This is believed to be from one of Margaret M. Hofmann's books on North Carolina land grants. Unfortunately, I seem to have lost the photocopy of the title sheet. Can someone help me give the proper citation?)
      Here is some more information about George Oldham of Caswell Co. during the American Revolution:
      >From a compilation of Revolutionary Accounts of North Carolina:
      "The United States of America to the State of North Carolina Dr: For Sundries furnished and Cash paid the Militia of North Carolina Virginia and South Carolina as allowed by the Auditors of Hillsborough District in June 1782 as p:Report No. 82"
      2022x To Capt: George Oldham for Militia Services of himself and Compy. as: Pay Roll No. 322 @ +400 - Specie 795.16 [pds]
      (Weynette Parks Haun., North Carolina Revolutionary Army Accounts, Accounts of the United States with North Carolina [Treasurer, State], Book C [Part XIV], [Durham, NC] p. 1905 )
      E. W. Wallace
















      The Battle of Camden
      August 16, 1780
      Camden District, South Carolina
      The Battle of Camden August 16, 1780 Early in the dawn hours of 16 August 1780, Colonel Otho H. Williams, surveying the American line, noticed the British advancing up the road. He consulted Captain Singleton of the artillery and it was detesh could be no more than 200 yards off. Williams gave the order for an artillery barrage and the British quickly unlimbered their guns and replied. The Battle of Camden had begun in earnest.Stevens, on the left, was ordered to move the Virginians forward and the inexperienced and seldom reliable militia responded with hesitation. Williams called for volunteers, led 80 or 90 troops to within 40 yards of the deploying British, and delivered a harassing fire from behind trees. Lord Cornwallis, positioned near the action and always alert, had noticed the Virginians' hesitation and ordered Webster to advance on the right. In what was one of the worst mismatches in military history, two of the best regiments to ever serve in the British Army, the 33rd Regiment and the 23rd Regiment, with the best trained light infantry in the world, came up against untrained and unreliable troops on the American left. Seeing the perfectly formed line sweep toward them with a mighty cheer then terrible silence, save the clanking of cold steel bayonet on musket barrel, the Virginians broke and ran. A few managed to get off a few shots and several of the British troops went down. However, the pell-mell panic quickly spread to the North Carolina militia near the road and soon the militia broke through the Maryland Continentals, stationed in reserve, and threw that normally-reliable troop into disarray.Seeing the wholesale panic of his entire left wing, Major General Horatio Gates mounted a swift horse and took to the road with his militia, leaving the battle to be decided by his more brave and capable officers. Incidentally, Gates covered sixty miles in just a few short hours! Although the Congress later exonerated him for his misconduct and cowardice, Gates never held a field command again.Baron Johann de Kalb and General Mordecai Gist, on the American right wing, and the Maryland Continentals were still in the field. One regiment of North Carolina militia did not take part in the flight and fell back into the fighting alongside the Delaware Continentals. Williams and de Kalb tried to bring Smallwood's reserve to the left of the 2nd Brigade to form an "L." However, Smallwood had fled the battle and the troop was without leadership. In the meantime, Cornwallis had advanced strong troops into the gap and between the two brigades. At this point Lord Cornwallis sent Colonel James Webster and his veteran troops against the First Maryland troops. Much to the credit of the Americans, they stood fast and went toe-to-toe with the best regiments in the world for quite some time. However, after several breaks and rallies, they were forced from the field and into the swamps. Most of the Maryland troops, because of the inability of Colonel Banastre Tarleton's horse to pursue in the terrain, escaped to fight another day.Only the Second Maryland Brigade, the Delaware Continentals, and Dixon's North Carolina militia continued the battle. At this point, it was some 600 men against 2,000. They had managed to check Lord Rawdon's left and had even taken a few prisoners. It should be noted here that in one of those strange battlefield occurrences, the American's most experienced Continentals were facing the British army's most inexperienced troops, the Royal NC Regiment. Baron Johann de Kalb personally led bayonet charge after bayonet charge for over an hour. His horse had been shot out from under him and he had suffered a saber cut to the head. In a final assault he killed a British soldier and then went down to bayonet wounds and bullet wounds. His troops closed around him and opposed yet another bayonet charge from the British.However, at this point, Colonel Tarleton returned with his horsemen from the pursuit of the fleeing militias and Cornwallis threw his horse troops on the American rear. The remaining American troops stood for a few minutes and fought the onslaught from all sides but finally broke and ran. The Battle of Camden was complete.About 60 men rallied as a rear guard and managed to protect the retreating troops through the surrounding woods and swamps. It should be noted that in the manner of warfare in the 18th Century, Lord Cornwallis took Baron de Kalb back to Camden and had him seen after by his personal physician. Unfortunately, the Baron succumbed to his wounds. He is buried in Camden and a monument has been erected to his memory on the old battlefield.Casualties for the Battle of Camden for the British were 331 out of all ranks for 2,239 engaged. This included two officers and 66 men killed, eighteen officers and 227 enlisted wounded, and eighteen missing. The American casualties have never been fully reckoned; however three officers died in battle and thirty were captured. Approximately 650-700 of General Gates' soldiers were either killed or taken prisoner out of 3,052 effectives engaged. The loss of arms and equipment was devastating to the American cause for months. Known Patriot Participants Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates - Commanding OfficerContinental Forces led by Maj. Gen. Johann-Alexandre von Robaii, Baron DeKalb in the following units:MD 1st Brigade led by Maj. Gen. William Smallwood with 400 men in the following units:MD 1st Regiment led by Lt. Col. Peter Adams, with Maj. Levin Winder, Capt. George Anderson, and Capt. William BruceMD 3rd Regiment led by Maj. Archibald Anderson, with Capt. Jacob Brice, Capt. John Smith, and Capt. Lilburn WilliamsMD 5th Regiment led by Col. William Richardson, with Capt. Perry Benson, Capt. Richard Bird, Capt. James Bruff, and Capt. Adam HoopsMD 7th Regiment led by Col. John Gunby, with Capt. Jonathan MorrisMD 2nd Brigade led by Brig. Gen. Mordecai Gist with 500 men in the following units:MD 2nd Regiment led by Lt. Col. John Eager Howard, with Capt-Lt. John Hardman, Capt. Edward Duvall, and Capt. John GassawayMD 4th Regiment led by Col. Josiah Carvel Hall, with Capt. Edward OldhamMD 6th Regiment led by Lt. Col. Benjamin Ford, with Capt-Lt. Nathan Williams and Capt. James SomervellThe DE Regiment led by Lt. Col. Joseph Vaughan with 280 men in the following six (6) known companies, led by:
      - 1st Company - Maj. John Patton
      - 2nd Company - Capt. Robert Kirkwood
      - 3rd Company - Capt. John Rhodes
      - 6th Company - Capt. John Learmonth
      - 8th Company - Capt. Peter Jacquett
      - Additional Company - Capt. George PurvisArmand's Legion of Horse & Foot led by Lt. Col. Charles Tuffin Armand with the following units:
      - Cavalry led by Count Nicholas Dietrick, Baron von Ottendorff with 60 men
      - 1st Troop of Dragoons - Lt. Richard Heard
      - 2nd Troop of Dragoons - Capt. Henry Bedkin
      - 3rd Troop of Dragoons - Capt. Jerome Le Brun de Bellecour
      - Corps of German Volunteers - Capt. Jost Driesbach with 40 men
      - Chasseur Company - Capt. Jacob Baner with 20 menMaj. Nelson's Regiment of VA State Cavalry led by Capt. Edmund Read, with 62 men in the following three (3) known companies, led by:
      - 1st Troop - Capt. Edmund Read
      - 2nd Troop - Capt. Martin Armand Vogluson
      - 3rd Troop - Capt. Charles FiererSC Volunteer Mounted Infantry led by Maj. Thomas Pinckney with 70 menContinental Artillery led by Col. Charles Harrison with 100 men in the following units:1st Continental Artillery Regiment of VA - Capt. William Meredith, with Capt.-Lt. John Blair, Capt. William L. Pierce, with 2 guns1st MD Continental Artillery Company led by Capt. Richard Dorsey, with Capt.-Lt. Ambrose Bohannon, with 2 guns2nd MD & 3rd MD Continental Artillery led by Capt. Anthony Singleton, with Capt.-Lt. Lewis Booker and Capt.-Lt. Richard Waters, with 4 gunsVA State Artillery Regiment led by Lt. Col. Elias Edmunds, with Capt. John WatlingtonVA State Troops, Light Infantry led by Lt. Col. Charles Porterfield, with six (6) known companies:
      - Capt. Thomas H. Drew
      - Capt. Thomas Upshaw
      - Capt. John Holliday
      - Capt. Thomas Downing
      - Capt. Thomas Minor
      - Capt. Edmund CurdNC Light Infantry (a temporary unit of NC State Troops) led by Maj. John Armstrong with 68 menNC State Militia led by Maj. Gen. Richard Caswell, Col. Thomas Blount (Adjutant General), Col. John Sitgreaves (Staff), Col. Benjamin Williams (Staff), Col. John Pugh Williams (Staff), Lt. Col. William Polk (Aide-de-Camp), and Maj. John Armstrong, with 1,800 men in the following units:Hillsborough District Brigade of Militia led by Brig. Gen. John Butler, with the following two (2) known regiments:1st Orange County Regiment of Milita, led by Col. Thomas Farmer, with eleven (11) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Abraham Allen
      - Capt. John Williams Daniel
      - Capt. William Horton
      - Capt. William Jamieson
      - Capt. Baxter King
      - Capt. James Mebane
      - Capt. William Nunn
      - Capt. Benjamin Rainey
      - Capt. William Rogers
      - Capt. John Walls
      - Capt. Daniel Woodson2nd Orange County Regiment of Militia, led by Col. John Collier, Maj. Bedford, Maj. James Dougan, Maj. William McCauley, and Maj. Joseph Sharpe, with the following twenty (20) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. William Chambers (Wake County)
      - Capt. Thomas Craig (Orange County)
      - Capt. Dillard (Orange County)
      - Capt. John Graves (Caswell County)
      - Capt. Davis Gresham (Orange County)
      - Capt. Shadrack Hargis (Orange County)
      - Capt. George Hodge (Orange County)
      - Capt. George Horton (Orange County)
      - Capt. Joseph Johnson (Chatham County)
      - Capt. John Johnston (Randolph County)
      - Capt. Buckner Kimbrell (Montgomery County)
      - Capt. Daniel McFarland (Caswell County)
      - Capt. David McFarland (Caswell County)
      - Capt. Robert McLane (Randolph County)
      - Capt. George Oldham (Caswell County)
      - Capt. John Rains (Randolph County)
      - Capt. George Samuel (Caswell County)
      - Capt. James Thompson (Orange County)
      - Capt. James Trice (Orange County)(POW/Died of Smallpox while in captivity
      - Capt. William Wilson (Guilford County)Caswell County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Lt. Col. Henry "Hal" Dixon, Lt. Col. Stephen Moore, Maj. Micajah Lewis, and Maj. Cader Parker, with twelve (12) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Samuel Ashe (NC Continental Artillery)
      - Capt. Peter Bennett (Granville County Regiment)
      - Capt. William Bennett (Granville County Regiment)
      - Capt. John Benton (Gates County Regiment)
      - Capt. Lewis Bledsoe (Wake County Regiment)
      - Capt. John Bowman (Burke County Regiment)
      - Capt. Joshua Hadley (1st NC Regiment)
      - Capt. George Lee (Caswell County Regiment)
      - Capt. Daniel Odom (Caswell County Regiment)
      - Capt. James Ray (Orange County Regiment)
      - Capt. James Ross (Granville County Regiment)
      - Capt. Edward Yarborough (3rd NC Regiment)Salisbury District Brigade of Militia led by Brig. Gen. Griffith Rutherford, Lt. Col. David Love, and Major Thomas Harris (Aide-de-Camp), with the following ten (10) known regiments:Anson County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Hicks, with three (3) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Patrick Boggan
      - Capt. Salathiel Clifton
      - Capt. John McInvale (killed)Burke County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Lt. Col. William Wofford, with unknown number of men.Guilford County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Col. John Peasley and Maj. Thomas Owen, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Asa Brashears
      - Capt. John Donnell
      - Capt. John McAdow
      - Capt. John Nelson
      - Capt. Peter O'Neal
      - Capt. Abraham Phillips
      - Capt. Henry WhitesellLincoln County Regiment of Militia detachment of three (3) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. William Armstrong
      - Capt. John Culbertson
      - Capt. William HutchisonMecklenburg County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. George Alexander, with the following fourteen (14) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Matthias Beaver
      - Capt. William Gardner
      - Capt. Samuel Givens
      - Capt. Conrad Hise
      - Capt. James Huggins
      - Capt. William Huggins
      - Capt. Nathaniel Marshall Martin
      - Capt. John McFalls
      - Capt. Thomas Shelby
      - Capt. Richard Springs
      - Capt. John Sterns
      - Capt. Steel
      - Capt. James White
      - Capt. David Wilson Richmond County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. William Threadgill Rowan County Regiment of Militia, led by Col. Francis Locke, with fifteen (15) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. William Bell
      - Capt. John Brandon
      - Capt. Alexander Davidson
      - Capt. Davis (killed)
      - Capt. John Dickey
      - Capt. Peter Hedrick
      - Capt. John Johnson
      - Capt. John Lopp
      - Capt. Jacob Nichols
      - Capt. Richmond Pearson
      - Capt. James Peavine
      - Capt. Samuel Reid
      - Capt. Richard Simmons
      - Capt. Thomas Tremain
      - Capt. WrightSurry County Regiment of Militia, led by Col. Martin Armstrong and Lt. Col. Robert Lanier, with the following eight (8) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Absalom Bostick
      - Capt. Samuel Dyer
      - Capt. James Freeman
      - Capt. David Humphreys
      - Capt. William Meredith
      - Capt. Paul Patrick
      - Capt. Arthur Scott
      - Capt. William Wilson (Rowan County)Washington County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Christopher CunninghamWilkes County Regiment of Militia, led by Col. Elijah Isaacs and Lt. Col. Drury Ledbetter, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. James Crump
      - Capt. Charles Gordon
      - Capt. Samuel Johnson
      - Capt. Joel Lewis
      - Capt. William Nall
      - Capt. William Nash
      - Capt. John Randleman (Rowan County)
      - Capt. Edward RutledgeEdenton District Brigade of Militia, led by Brig. Gen. Isaac Gregory and the following five (5) known regiments:Bertie County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Maj. James Foy, with one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Francis PughCurrituck County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Samuel Jarvis with unknown number of men.Hertford County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Abner Perry (wounded)Martin County Regiment of Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. John Kennedy
      - Capt. WilliamsPasquotank County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Owen WilliamsHalifax District Brigade of Militia detachment, led by Col. Jeptha Eatherton, with six (6) known regiments:Edgecombe County Regiment of Militia detachment of six (6) known companied, led by:
      - Capt. James Barrow
      - Capt. John Bell
      - Capt. Edward Hall
      - Capt. Simon Lee
      - Capt. Exum Phillips
      - Capt. Richard ShippFranklin County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Lt. Col. William Brickell, with two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Julius Alford
      - Capt. Harrison MaconHalifax County Regiment of Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Elisha Hurt
      - Capt. John PattersonNash County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Benjamin Kitchen (wounded)Northampton County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Maj. Robert Peoples, with two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Samuel Lockhart
      - Capt. John PetersonWarren County Regiment of Militia detachment of six (6) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. John Macon
      - Capt. George Nasworthy
      - Capt. Benjamin Richards
      - Capt. John Vose
      - Capt. John White
      - Capt. Joel WrenNew Bern District Brigade of Militia, led by Col. Benjamin Exum, Maj. John Nall, and Maj. Agrippa Nichols, with five (5) known regiments:Craven County Regiment of Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. David Roach
      - Capt. Joshua WindhamDobbs County Regiment of Militia detachment, led by Maj. Richard Caswell, Jr., with unknown number of men.Jones County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Simon Edwards (POW/Wounded)Pitt County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Augustin Spain Wayne County Regiment of Militie detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Lazarus Crawford Wilmington District Brigade of Militia detachment led by Unknown, with five (5) known regiments: Bladen County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Joseph Wood Brunswick County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Thomas Callendar Cumberland County Regiment of Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Charles Crawford
      - Capt. John Cox New Hanover County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. James Love Onslow County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. James Foy VA Militia Brigade led by Brig. Gen. Edward Stevens and the following units :Louisa County Militia (VA) - Col. George Stubblefield, with Lt. Col. Joseph Spencer, Maj. William Moseley, and Capt. John Byers Pittsylvania County Militia (VA) - Capt. Thomas Roberts Culpepper County Militia (VA) - Capt. William Stanton Fauquier County Militia (VA) - Capt. Elias Edmuncs Amelia County Militia (VA) - Lt. Col. Holt Richardson, with Maj. John Bias, Capt. William Craddock Caroline County Militia (VA) - Capt. James Johnson Hanover County Militia (VA) - Capt. John Price Bedford County Militia (VA) - Capt. Nathaniel Tate and Capt. Thomas Leftwich Chesterfield County Militia (VA) - Lt. Col. Ralph Faulkner, with Capt. Archibald Walthal and Capt. Booker Lunenburg County Militia (VA) - Capt. Walker Dinwiddie County Militia (VA) - Capt. George Pegram Mecklenburgh County Militia (VA) - Col. James Lucas Amherst County Militia (VA) - Capt. Azariah MartinHalifax County Militia (VA) - Col. Lawson, with Capt. Paul WattingtonCharlotte County Militia (VA) - Col. Downman, with Maj. Henry Conway and Capt. Thomas WilliamsPittsylvania County Militia (VA) - Capt. Isaac Clement, Capt. William Dix, and Capt. Peter PerkinsHenry County Militia (VA) - Capt. Cunningham and Capt. George WallerPowhatan County Militia (VA) - Col. William MaySouth Carolina Militia, led by "Unknown":Turkey Creek Regiment detachment of four (4) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Robert Frost
      - Capt. Henry Lisle
      - Capt. Patrick McGriff
      - Capt. John SteelKershaw Regiment detachment of four (4) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. William Deason
      - Capt. George Dunlap
      - Capt. Thomas Glaze
      - Capt. Jack GrayCamden District Regiment detachment of three (3) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Benjamin Carter, with Lt. John Cathey, Jr.
      - Capt. Richard Tucker
      - Capt. John WeathersUpper Ninety-Six District Regiment detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Robert Maxwell
      - Capt. McALittle River District Regiment detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
      - Capt. Pendleton Isbell
      - Capt. William Mulwee2nd Spartan Regiment detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. John WalkerNew Acquisition District Regiment detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Maj. John WallaceFairfield Regiment detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. John LandCheraws District Regiment detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. Jesse SteadsOrangeburgh District Regiment detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. John McKenzieHill's Regiment of Light Dragoons detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
      - Capt. John HollisCol. Wade Hampton's Regiment detachment of one (1) known company led by:
      - Capt. Peter BurnsUnknown Regiment - one (1) company led by:
      - Capt. Robert DavisTotal Patriot Forces - 4,100 Known British/Loyalist Participants Lt. Gen. Charles Cornwallis - Commanding OfficerBritish Regulars led by Lt. Col. James Webster with 1,000 men in the following units:23rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Welsh Fusiliers) led by Lt. Col. Nesbit Balfour with 292 men, including the following officers:
      - Maj. Frederick MacKenzie
      - Capt. William Keppel
      - Capt. Sir William Howe
      - Capt. Forbes Champagne
      - Capt. Thomas Saumarez
      - Capt. James Drury
      - Capt. Charles Ward Apthorp33rd Regiment of Foot led by Maj. William Dancey with 238 men, including the following officers:
      - Capt. Frederick Cornwalls
      - Capt. Allen Malcolme
      - Capt. James Campbell
      - Capt. John Manley
      - Capt. John Kerr
      - Capt. Hildebrand Oakes - Grenadier Company71st Regiment of Foot (Fraser's Highlanders) led by Lt. Col. Alexander McDonald with the following units:
      - 1st Battalion - Capt. Hugh Campbell, with 144 men
      - 2nd Battalion - Capt. "Unknown," with 110 men Light Infantry led by Capt. Charles Campbell with 148 men in the following units:71st Regiment of Foot (Fraser's Highlanders) led by Capt. Charles Campbell and the following unit:
      - Light Infantry Company - Lt. Archibald Campbell16th Regiment of Foot Light Infantry Company - Lt. John Skinner with 78 men NY Volunteers, 3rd Battalion, Light Infantry Company - Capt. "Unknown"Royal Regiment of Artillery with 19 men in the following units:3rd Battalion, Number 1 Company - Lt. John MacLeod, with 4 guns4th Battalion, Number 6 Company - Lt. William Marquois, with 2 guns
      Additionals, including artillery manned by the British Legion - 126 men with 6 gun sCorps of Guides & Pioneers - Lt. Andrew Husband, with 28 men Provincials led by Col. Francis Lord Rawdon, with 800 men in the following units: British Legion led by Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton and the following units:
      - Legion Infantry - Capt. Patrick Stewart, with 126 men
      - Legion Cavalry - Maj. George Hanger, with 182 men Volunteers of Ireland led by Col. Francis Lord Rawdon with 303 men, including the following officers:
      - Capt.-Lt. David Dalton
      - Capt. John Campbell
      - Capt. John Doyle
      - Capt. Charles Hastings
      - Capt. James King
      - Capt. John McMahon Royal NC Regiment led by Lt. Col. John Hamilton with 267 men NC Volunteers Loyalist Militia led by Col. Samuel Bryan with 202 men, with the following officers:
      - Lt. Col. John Hampton
      - Capt. Nicholas White

      Total British/Loyalist Forces - 2,239
    Person ID I2349   oldham
    Last Modified 18 Mar 2017 

    DNA Tests  Y-DNA-269553 OLDHAM, Richard

    Father OLDHAM, Richard,   b. 1705-1711, Northumberland County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1785, Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother BAYSE, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1715, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F833  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family OLDHAM, Major George,   b. 1750, Prince William County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1840, Barnwell District, Anderson County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years) 
    Married Abt 1775  Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, Nancy,   b. 20 Mar 1776, Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1840, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     2. OLDHAM, John,   b. 3 Aug 1778, Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1832, Shelby County, Alabama, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     3. OLDHAM, Martha Patsey Sneed,   b. 25 Feb 1779, Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Apr 1845  (Age 66 years)
     4. OLDHAM, George,   b. 26 Feb 1781, Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1850  (Age 68 years)
     5. OLDHAM, Mary,   b. 26 Mar 1783,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. OLDHAM, Zelpha or Zilpha,   b. 3 Apr 1785, Caswell County, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Dec 1860, Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     7. OLDHAM, William,   b. 20 Jan 1788, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Jul 1870  (Age 82 years)
     8. OLDHAM, Thomas,   b. 17 Feb 1792, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 1875, Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     9. OLDHAM, Garland,   b. 13 Jun 1795, Pendleton District, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1841  (Age 45 years)
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F977  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1750 - Prince William County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Abt 1775 - Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - Bounty Land Grant - Mar 1803 - Anderson County, South Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilitary - - Chowan County. North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 31 Mar 1840 - Barnwell District, Anderson County, South Carolina Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Documents 2 documents

  • Sources 
    1. [S237] Will & DAR Papers; Lee Hoffman.

    2. [S2994] Obituary, (In File).

    3. [S3077] Todd G. Oldham.

    4. [S364] Histories and Genealogies of the Families of Miller, Woods, Harris, Wallace, Maupin, Oldham, Kavanaugh and Brown, Wm. Miller, (http://www.archive.org/details/historygenealogie00mill).

    5. [S51] WFT #3170*7, (Family Tree Maker CD Rom).