Oldham Family History

OLDHAM,  James(95)

OLDHAM, James(95)

Male 1750 - 1827  (~ 85 years)

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  • Name OLDHAM, James(95) 
    Born Between 1742 and 1750  [1
    Gender Male 
    AFN L88S-6BV 
    Residence 1768  Loudoun County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Tithable List
    1768
    Powell's List
    Page 1d1
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Parish Map
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Loudoun County, Virginia, USA
    Early Map
    Military 1776  [2
    Residence 1776  Shenandoah County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Lease entered in Frederick County, Virginia, USA 
    Oldham, James(95)
    Oldham, James(95)
    Lord Fairfax Lease

    Shenandoah County, Virginia, USA
    Petition of Ten Thousand Names<br>
Virginia<br>
1775-1776
    Petition of Ten Thousand Names
    Virginia
    1775-1776

    Oldham, James(95)<br>  abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Page 1
    Oldham, James(95)<br>  abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Page 2
    Residence 1780  Home Creek, Henry County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1782  Pittsylvania County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1785  Henry County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 1788  South of French Broad, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 1789  South of French Broad, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1795  Oldham, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Oldham, James(95)
    Oldham, James(95)
    Article about James Oldham's house in Sevier County, Tennessee
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
    Oldham, James(95)

    Tennessee Historical Society Article

    Picture of Oldham-Owen house

    Sevier County, Tennessee
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Forks of the Little Pigeon Baptist Church

    Transcription of Membership Rolls
    Oldham, James(95)
    Oldham, James(95)
    East Fork of the Little Pigeon River

    Sevier County, Tennessee
    Land 28 Sep 1809  Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1810  Jennings Twp., Fayette County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1813  Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Signer of Petition from Resident of French Broad and Holston Country Regarding Indebtedness. Presented to the General Assembly in 1813. 
    1813 Petition from Residents of French Broad and Holston County
    1813 Petition from Residents of French Broad and Holston County
    Census 1820  Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 22 Oct 1825  Union County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 14 May 1827  Rush County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 15 May 1827  Fayette County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 4, 5, 6
    Will 16 Jun 1827  Fayette County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Indiana, Wills and Probate Records, 1798-1999 
    • Indiana, Wills and Probate Records, 1798-1999

      The Last Will & Testament of James Oldham

      In the name of God Amen

      I James Oldham of the State of Indiana Fayette County Being in perfect mind and memory do hereby make my Last Will and Testament as following to whit, I will that all my Just Debts be paid out of my presenced Estate

      2nd. I will that my wife Leah have as much household and Kitchen furniture as She may think necessary Together with her Saddle and a cow and her maintenance all her natural lifetime out of any Estate.

      3rd. I will that all the balance of my personal and real Estate Be Sold and equally divided among my heirs as follows (to wit) Stephen Oldham, Moses Oldham, George Oldham, William Oldham, John Oldham, James Oldham, Nancy Sewell and Sarah Longley and Mary Adams my Deceased Daughter's Children to have one Childs part.

      4th. I will that my Son George Odlham be my executor--In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seal this 15th day of May 1827.

      James X(His Mark) Oldham (SEAL)

      Test
      James Smith
      Test
      Samuel Hancock
    Oldham, James, Jr<br>
1794-1853
    Oldham, James, Jr
    1794-1853

    Suit against heirs of James(95) regarding land in Rush County, Indiana
    Oldham, James(95)
 abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95) abt 1742-1827
    Probate File

    Transcription Page 1
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate

    Transcription Page 2
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate Record
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate Document
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Will Record
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate Record
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate File

    Transcription Page 3
    Oldham, James(95)<br>
abt 1742-1827
    Oldham, James(95)
    abt 1742-1827

    Probate File

    Transcription Page 4
    Notes 
    • from: James Quinn
      reply-to: jamesaquinn@verizon.net
      to: oldhamfamilies@gmail.com
      date: Mon, Sep 22, 2014 at 4:07 PM

      It appears very likely that the James Oldham (I56100) who died in 1751 in Fairfax County (now probably in Loudoun Co.) was the father of James Oldham m. Leah Stephens based on his association with John Smarr (later the plantation owner where we find James and George Oldham).

      Fairfax DB C-116-118 29 January 1750, John Smarr, Sylvester Gardener and Mary, his wife, in county of Fairfax and parish of Cameron and William West of same... for 40 pds... sold land in parish of Truro, it being the land and inheritance fallent to the said John Smarr by the death of his Father, Andrew Smarr, being part of a Tract of land taken up by Andrew Smarr, Burdet Harrison and Thomas Harrison and granted by deed to them ... bearing date 22nd February 1729...
      John x Smarr, Sylvester x Gardner, Mary x Gardner
      In the Presence of William Robinson, Jer. Hutchison, Benja. Hutchison, Joseph Hutchison, Philip Langfit, JAMES OLDHAM, John x Henwood.
      Deed of Feoffment recorded 26th March 1751.
      Source:
      (Ruth & Sam Sparacio, DEED ABSTRACTS OF FAIRFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 1750-1761 [McLean, VA: The Antient Press, 19??], p. 13)

      This James Oldham (d. before Jan. 1751/1752 - date of estate inventory.) Loudoun County was established in 1757 from Fairfax County.

      A separate deed has Robert Stephens (signs with X) and James Oldham (signs name) on it: Fairfax Co., DB C-113-116, 16 Nov 1750 Edward Graham of county of Fairfax and parish of Cameron, planter to William West of same, Surveyor... 50 pds .. sell my right and inheritance of all that Tract of Land left me by my Father, Edward Graham, deceased, being part of a Tract of Land granted to my Father by deed ... being date 15th May 1731, and left to me by will of my Father, bearing date 12th September 1749...Edward x Graham; Janne x Graham
      In the Presence of Benjn. Hutchison, Simon x Reader, George x Graham, Joseph x Groves, William Jannings, Thos. Squires, William Talbut, George x Roberts, Robt. x Stevens, Vincent Lewis, Joseph Hutchison, Jer. Hutchison, John x Henwood,
      JAMES OLDHAM

      Have any Oldhams from our line submitted yDNA yet? If so does it match the northern neck of Virginia line (or lines, as it is not clear to me that Northumberland and Richmond county lines are one yet...)

      James Quinn (son of Gerald and Helen Quinn)


      Timeline

      1767 Loudoun County, Overseer for John Smarr
      1768 Loudoun County, Overseer for John Smarr
      1769 Loudoun County, Tithable with George Oldham
      1773 Loudoun County, Overseer for Wm. Berkley
      1774 Loudoun County, Overseer for Wm. Berkley
      1775 Loudoun County, Shelburne Parish
      1776 Aug, Frederick County, Lord Fairfax Grant
      1776 Aug 5th VA Regt Payroll Muster
      1776 Dec 5th VA Regt Payroll Muster- James & Richard Stephens Deceased
      1777 May 5th VA Regt Payroll Muster
      1778 Henry County, Virginia Tax List
      1780 Henry County, VA Survey on Home Creek next to Wm. Stephens
      1781 Henry County, VA Tithable
      1788 Territory South of French Road & Holston Rivers petition
      1789 Sevier County, TN Petition French Broad & Holston
      1799 Aug, Sevier County, TN Petition for Inhabitants South of French Broad
      1807 Apr 4, Sevier County, Survey East Fork of Little Pigeon
      1808 Sevier County TN; Church member Forks of Little Pigeon with Stephen
      1809 Feb 28, Sevier County, Down payment adjoining John Oldham
      1809 Sep 28; 225 Sevier County, granted 225 acres also granted John & Stephen
      1810 Jennings Twp., Fayette County, Indiana
      1813 Sevier County, Petition for French Broad
      1813 Oct, Sevier County, Sons John & Stephen obtained Indiana land.
      1814 Fayette County, IN Received in membership New Bethel Baptist Church
      1815 Jan, Union County, IN obtained land in Indiana
      1815 Oct 15; Fayette County, IN Ltr of Recommendation New Bethel
      1827 Rush County, IN patent Twp. 15N, R002E Sec 31
      1827 Jun, will probated Fayette County, IN, George Exec.

      For over twenty years, researchers have used the research of C. V. Jackson, Lt., Retired and Helen Quinn of Springfield, Ohio, which showed they may have found the parents of James Oldham, who married Leah Stephens, the progenitor or the Fayette County, Indiana Oldham Family. Both Lt. Jackson and Helen felt James was a son of Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham, who settled in Caswell County, North Carolina in the late 1700s.

      C. V. Jackson?s research notes of 1972 developed a timeline for James Oldham of Loudoun County, Virginia, Sevier County, Tennessee and Fayette County, Indiana. I feel Lt. Jackson was actually looking at records that involved two different men named James Oldham. His time line is as follows:

      Oldham Creek, Tennessee probably named after James8 (just east of Pigeon Forge)

      1767, July; in Fauquier County, Virginia
      1768, August; defendant in law suit Fauquier County, Virginia
      1771, Oct; defendant in Fauquier County, Virginia
      1773, Nov Court, Fauquier Co, Virginia Minute Book 1773-1780 Thomas Maddus, Plaintiff against James Oldham, Defendant. and James Oldham Plaintiff against Charles Smith Defendant. Defendants won in each case - I couldn't read the charges.
      1776, August 20, lease from Lord Fairfax with wife Leah and son Stephen1, witness Sampson Stephens - 100 acres in Loudon County on banks of Shenandoah
      1778, Dec 22; 250 acres on Stoney Creek, joining land entered by John Pepper and Thomas Spencer, including improvements in North Carolina
      1780-1786 tax lists for St. David's District Caswell County, North Carolina
      1784 250 acres on Stoney Creek, Caswell County, North Carolina 1786 census, 1 w male 21-60, 7 other wh males 2 females 1787, Nov 29; sold 250 acres on Stoney Creek
      1790 census Pendleton District, South Carolina

      1799, Aug 22; signed petition for inhabitants, south of French Broad in Tenn 1813 signed similar petition from French Broad, sons Stephen1 and George11 also signed.
      1807 April 4; land surveyed on little East Ford of Little Pigeon River in Sevier County, Tennessee
      1808 member of church comm with son Stephen, Forks of Pigeon Baptist Church
      1809, Feb 28; made down payment of $22.58 l/2 for 225 3/4 acres on the Little East Fork of Little Pigeon River. Described as joining the land of his son John Oldham, Hugh Dugan and Henry Bohanon. 1809, Sept 28; James8 granted 225 acres by Tennessee Gov, sons John16 and Stephen1 also granted land in Sevier County, Tennessee
      1813 Oct 13; son Stephen1 granted land in Fayette County, Indiana

      1815, Jan 16; James8 granted land in Union County, Indiana, son John16 in Fayette County, Indiana
      1814, lst Saturday, James O., Jr was received in membership at New Bethel Baptist Church Fayette County, Indiana
      1815, Oct; the New Bethel Church granted James Oldham a letter of recommendation. (Note from H.Q.: I included these two bits of information from my notes to show you that I believe it was James12 who purchased land in Union County, Indiana and then returned the next year perhaps to Tennessee)(When James8 died in Fayette County, Indiana, people in Tennessee still owed him money. New Bethel is almost on the Union Co. line. Maybe James8Sr., came to Indiana and left. 1827, Jun 14; will probated in Fayette County, Indiana, George11 made executor and after George11death in 1828, William 21 made executor.

      Lt. Jackson traveled over 10,000 miles researching the Oldham families in Virginia and provided a good backbone for future researchers. Lt. Jackson and Mrs. Quinn used a numbering system to denote which Oldham he was speaking of in his research. The James of Loudoun County, Virginia born about 1742-1750 is shown in their work as James(8). In the early 1990s it began to become apparent that the James of Loudoun County, Virginia and the James in Caswell County, North Carolina might not be the same person. At this point I changed Lt. Jackson?s numbering in my records to James(95) of Loudoun County, Virginia and James(95a) of Caswell County, North Carolina, in order to keep the research on these two individuals separate.

      Lt. Jackson spent the last years of his life poring over microfiche and books, trying to utilize his local Family History Center to its fullest. He shared freely what information he was able to find and never claimed his work was either perfect or correct. His daughter continues to generously provide copies of her father?s research to all who request them.

      Research by Mrs. Allie Oldham contends the James of Loudoun County, Virginia is not the son of Richard, but a different Oldham line. She states: ?It took me 15 years to finally prove that Lt. C. V. Jackson was wrong in that his James was in Caswell County, North Carolina in 96 and Pendleton District, South Carolina. And Richard Oldham who married Elizabeth Bayse is the son of Richard Oldham and not the son of John and Abigail. Jesse and James Oldham probably went together to Caswell County, North Carolina. Later the father and other family members moved to Caswell County, North Carolina. Jesse went to Kentucky. The others went to South Carolina and lived until the 1790's. Major George Oldham stayed in South Carolina and all the others moved to Kentucky. People have confused your James Oldham with my husband's James Oldham. It took me 15 years to prove that your James is not the son of Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham. And people have used my James' military duty to enter the DAR on your James. My James did leave a will in Hopkins County, Kentucky". Mrs. Allie Oldham stated to Helen Quinn that her group of Oldham?s used a naming system based on ?Cousins?, but was not willing to divulge the details of how that system worked.

      At the time of this correspondence, Georgia Oldham was the only DAR member filing for membership under James Oldham (of Sevier County, Tennessee). I have copies of her research in file. In 2009 a second researcher was approved for membership in DAR based on James(95) Revolutionary War service. Mrs. Betty Randall kindly provided copies of this application packet and it is also in my file. The only Revolutionary War Pension file found for a James Oldham was for service by a James born in Maryland and serving from Pennsylvania.

      To date, no definite documentation has been found, which would allow any researcher to state with authority whether Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham had a son named James, much less which James Oldham it would be. We know there was a James Oldham in Fauquier County, Virginia and a James Oldham in Orange/Caswell County, North Carolina. We also know a James Oldham from the Hillsborough District of Caswell County, North Carolina served or provided goods and/or services during the Revolutionary War. Moses Oldham, thought to be a son of Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham, brother of Jesse and James of Caswell County, also filed for reimbursement from the government for a wagon used during the Revolutionary War, as evidenced by an affidavit filed by his daughter Sallie Dougherty for a portion of the funds. No pension file has been found for service by James(95a) Oldham of Caswell County, North Carolina.

      Several researchers feel the James Oldham who died in Fayette County, Indiana is the same James Oldham who migrated to South Carolina with the Caswell County, North Carolina Oldham families. However, I feel the James found in Pendleton District was a member of the Caswell County family of Richard Oldham or another early family and died in Hopkins County, Kentucky about 1829.

      Subsequent research has failed to prove a relationship between James Oldham of Loudoun County, Virginia and Richard Oldham of Caswell County, North Carolina. Richard of Caswell County is thought to have been born about 1705-1711 in what was then Northumberland County, Virginia and was also thought to be the husband of Elizabeth Bayse, daughter of Edmond Bayse, Jr. (d.1746 Northumberland County, Virginia, testate). Elizabeth was named in her father's will as Elizabeth, wife of Richard Oldham. Northumberland County, Virginia Record Book 1743-1749, pages 123 and 124, a transcription of the will is found in the appendix of this document. Although named as the wife of Richard Oldham, there is not enough information to determine which Richard Oldham, of that time period, Elizabeth married. The name Richard is not used in the Fayette County, Indiana Oldham family.

      To date, no will for Richard or Elizabeth Bayse Oldham has been found in either Virginia or North Carolina, making it difficult to prove the children of this family. However, based on land records for Caswell County, North Carolina, it would appear the James Oldham of Orange and Caswell County, believed by Lt. Jackson and Mrs. Quinn to be the same James found in Loudoun County, Virginia, is actually a different James Oldham. James of Caswell County, North Carolina received a land grant in Orange County, North Carolina about 1768. (William D. Bennett, Orange County Records, Volume I - Granville Proprietary Land Office: Abstracts of Loose Papers [Raleigh, NC: Privately published, 1987] [{p. 52 of cited work] Oldham, James Warrant 1 Feb 1763 to William Churton to survey 700 acres on Piney Br., Haw R., includes Thos. Church's improvements.Surveyed 29 Apr 1763, [p. 54 of cited work] Oldham, James Survey 29 Apr 1763

      180 acres on north side Haw R., joins Robt. Wells; Robt. Wells, Jessey Oldham: SCC. 2 copies]Note: SCC = sworn chain carrier. It is believed that James Oldham and Jesse Oldham are brothers. Later Jesse is found in Caswell Co. NC records, which county was formed 1777 from Orange Co.)

      At this time James of Loudoun County, Virginia makes his first appearances on the Tithable lists in Virginia

      Since it appears we are dealing with two different James Oldham families, I turned back to Loudoun County, Virginia records to try to determine the correct parentage for James of Loudoun County, Virginia.

      According to "Marriages of Loudoun County, 1757-1853" by Mary Alice Wertz: "Loudoun County was formed from Fairfax County, which was primarily Truro Parish, in 1757. In October 1748, Truro was divided at Difficult Run and the upper part became Cameron Parish. When Loudoun was created, its boundaries were essentially those of Cameron Parish; on the north it was bounded by the Potomac River; on the south by Prince William County (which later became Fauquier); on the east by Difficult Run; and on the west by the Blue Ridge Mountains. In 1770, Shelburne Parish was created from the western part of Cameron and included, generally, the land west of Goose Creek running to the Blue Ridge"



      Figure 1. Early Loudoun County, Virginia
      Loudoun County is part of the five million acre North Neck Virginia Proprietary granted to seven noblemen in 1649 by King Charles II of England. Later known as the Fairfax Proprietary, the grant includes the land between the Potomac and Rappahannock Rivers. Between 1635 and 1730, Westmoreland, Stafford and Prince William Counties were formed within the Proprietary and in 1742 the remaining land was designated as Fairfax County. The Virginia House of Burgesses divided Fairfax County in 1757 and the western portion was named Loudoun for John Campbell, 4th Earl of Loudon, a Scottish nobleman who served as Commander in Chief for all British forces in North American and the titular Governor of Virginia from 1756 to 1768.

      Settlement of Loudoun County began about 1720 by many Quakers, Germans, Irish and Scots-Irish settling west of the Catoctin mountains. The Quakers formed the settlements of Waterford, Goose Creek (now Lincoln), Harmony (now Hamilton) and Union (now Unison). About 1725-1730, while is was still owned by Lord Fairfax, settlers came from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland and eastern Virginia, and began establishing large tobacco plantations. Between 1745-1760,Germans from Pennsylvania and Maryland formed a settlement at Lovettsville. After Braddock?s Defeat by the French at Fort Duquesne in 1755, refugees from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia began settling the western part of Loudoun County, south of Short Hill. Catoctin Church became the center of their settlement.


      Early Virginia County Map
      18. Frederick
      19. Fairfax
      20. Fauquier
      33. Loudoun
      46. Prince William

      James Oldham married Leah Stephens on 01 January 1774 in Shelburne Parish, Loudoun County, Virginia. The marriage was performed by Reverend David Griffith. Researcher Deborah Anderson located the marriage record in Reverend Griffith?s personal account book, in which he recorded his business transactions; salary paid to him (usually in pounds of tobacco) and the fees he received for performing marriages and funerals.)

      Although several researchers have shown Leah Stephens as the daughter of Sampson Stephens, it appears Sampson and Leah were probably brother and sister, children of William Stephens born about 1720-1729 and Mary. Many sources claim Mary?s maiden name is Sampson based on an undocumented genealogy book published in 1955 by George Jacob Davis. To date, I have been unable to verify Mary?s last name was Sampson.

      Researcher Aaron Stevens (apstevens1@yahoo.com) , has been able to document two other children of William and Mary Stephens ? a daughter Ann who married Edwin Furr and moved to Kentucky in the 1790s and a daughter Stacy. No other information is known about Stacy Stephens, other than her mention in the ?Three Lives Lease? in Loudoun County in 1775.

      Lt. Jackson found a lease from Lord Fairfax for property in Frederick County, Virginia, dated 20 August 1776,(Deed Books of Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Book 17, p 193-194) which names James and Leah Oldham of Loudoun County, their son, Stephen and "the longest liver of them all". This lease was signed by Sampson Stephens, which would indicate a relationship to Leah Stephens Oldham. This tract of 100 acres in Western Loudoun County was apparently not to James Oldham's liking, as there are no records of James and Leah in western Loudon, Frederick or Shenandoah County, Virginia, with the exception of a single sentence noted in Annals of Clarke County, Virginia, Stuart E. Brown, 9) as early settlers on the western slopes of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

      A copy of this Lord Fairfax lease is contained in the appendix of this document.




      Figure . Lord Fairfax Grant Map





      A review of the Lord Fairfax Grants shows the following:
      1766 -? William Oldham
      1768 -- Aughney, Dabney and wife Ann Oldham Aughney, stepson William Oldham, Lot 53 Wappacomo, south branch of the Potomac
      August 29, 1776?Boneham, Elijah of Frederick County, 100 acres in Frederick County. This could have been the Bohanon family. There are Bohanon?s in Henry County, Virginia and Sevier County, Tennessee near James Oldham.
      August 29, 1776?Oldham, James of Loudoun County, 100 acres in Loudoun County
      July 7, 1777?Conner, Daniel of Frederick County, 100 acres in Frederick County. Daniel Conner is later found in Sevier County, Tennessee.

      Lt. Jackson and Mrs. Quinn felt Sampson Stephens was the father of Leah Stephens. Later research shows James Oldham and Sampson Stephens are most likely contemporaries, depending on their actual birth dates. It appears that James Oldham was born between 1742 and 1750 and Sampson Stephens appears to have been born about 1736. Leah Stephens' birth appears to be about 1752. Based on these age estimates, Sampson appears to be a brother of Leah, rather than her father.

      According to Stephens/Stevens family researcher, Aaron Stephens, Sampson was the grandson of Robert Stephens of Loudoun County, Virginia, his father being William Stephens. He states there are many records of Sampson and Leah in Loudoun County, Virginia. A separate section is included about the Stephens family history.


      Map of the Lord Fairfax Grant

      1766 Loudoun County records indicate a William Oldham received a Grant from Lord Fairfax and a Lord Fairfax lease was recorded on 15 Sep 1768 in the name of Darby Aughney, Anne Aughney(widow of John Oldham) and William Oldham(thought to be John and Ann Oldham?s son), for 400 acres on the South Branch of the Potomac. Survey #53 is recorded for Darby Aughney, Ann Aughney William Oldham and W. F. J. Taylor (Surveys on the Wappacomo - South branch of Potomac) Survey #55 is for William Ross and heirs, Lawrence Ross, James and David Parsons, and Osborne Spriggs

      Ann Conway Oldham Aughney is believed to be the widow of John Oldham born 17 October 1708 in Northumberland County, Virginia (Northumberland Co Order & Record Book, pg 134), died before 12 March 1765 in Hampshire County, Virginia. The records of Hampshire County, Virginia (now West Virginia) show "Darby Aughney and Ann, his wife, widow of John Oldham" posting a bond as Administrators of the Estate of said John Oldham, dated 12 March 1765.

      Since we have a William, the family of John and a James Oldham receiving Lord Fairfax leases in this area, there may be a connection between the three families.

      During the 1990s Gerrold and Helen Quinn traveled to Frederick County, Virginia and located the land granted to James and Leah Oldham. Helen took a photo of her husband standing on that land. She said she could understand why James and Leah decided to move on, due to the difficult terrain involved. Mrs. Quinn felt that the James Oldham family may have never actually lived on the land. Unfortunately Mrs. Quinn did not communicate the actual location of the grant lands before her untimely death.



      Gerrold Quinn on Lord Fairfax Grant Land

      I located records pertaining to James and George Oldham, John Smarr and Richard and Sampson Stephens in the Tax Rolls of Loudoun County between 1758 and 1775, George Oldham appears to have remained in Loudoun County until at least 1781. James Oldham, John Smarr and Richard Stephens are not on the tax rolls after 1775.

      The following is shown in the records of Loudoun County, Virginia:

      From Marty Hiatt & Craig Roberts Scott, LOUDOUN COUNTY VIRGINIA TITHABLES 1758-1786, VOLUME 1 [1749], 1758-1769 with index [Athens, GA: Iberian Publishing Co., 1995] In reviewing the available original tax lists, I found:

      1749
      Oldham, Jas 1 [p. 13]

      This could be the James who received a Grant of 700 Acres in Orange County, North Carolina in 1768 or the James b. 13 November 1722, Richmond County, Virginia, married to Tabitha Haydon. They had a son William who born 13 May 1745 who married Susan Sydnor and appears to have obtained land in Loudoun County, 7/8 June 1763. William Oldham acted as a witness to a land transaction involving Fortunatus Sydnor in Loudoun County, Virginia shortly before his marriage to Susanna Sydnor in 1765 in Northumberland County, Virginia.

      James and Tabitha Hayden Oldham also had a son James Hayden Oldham, born about 1742, in William's will probated in 1754 in Richmond County, Virginia, he names his children, William, Tabitha and son "James Oldham otherwise called James Heydon".

      When Tabitha Heydon Oldham's father wrote his will in 1765, there is no mention of James Oldham or his son James Heydon, which would lead me to believe they both may have died prior to 1765. I have not been able to locate further records on either of them. We know James Oldham of Loudon County doesn't appear on the Tithable Lists until abt 1767 (1766 list missing)

      The tax/Tithable lists normally only show males residents over the age of 16. The infirm and elderly were exempt from taxes. A review of the Tax Lists for Loudoun County reveals the following information:

      Loudoun Co. Tithables, 1758-1769: 1759 Taken by Richard Coleman -
      At Capt. Samuel Oldham's quarter. Joshua Harrison Overseer. N. Hazard, Nece, Frem. Nann - 5 other names in same portion of list - Newdigate Owsley, Henry Taylor, Edward Conner, Wm. Nodding, Mary Brewster, Richard Vallendingham, George Jackson, Benjamin Bright, Col. Wm. Fitzhugh, Thos; Ludwell Lee, John Herryford, John Fouch,

      1760 taken by William West (Cameron Parish, Fairfax Co.)
      Robert Stephens, negro Hagar - 2
      Capt. Samuel Oldham (Add N. Hazard, Tim, Philip, Nan, Jude) -6 Capt. Samuel Oldham, Joshua Harrison overseer
      other names in same portion of list - John Taylo, Charles Taylor with Henry Heriford, Willoughby Newton(father of Elizabeth who married Capt. Samuel Oldham), Thomas Cockril, Henry Lee, Joseph and Thadeus Read, Peter Turley

      1761 taken by Richard Coleman, Loudoun County
      At Capt. Saml. Oldham's Qr., Thomas Williams Overseer, N. Hassard, Philip. Teme, Nan, Juda - 6 Richard Stevens, Rober. Stephens, N. George - 3 (only one entry separates Capt. Samuel) Other names in same portion of list - Richard Valandingham, Joseph Lyles,Manasseh Lyles, John Conley, Edwd. Coners, Benj. Bright, John Heryford,

      1762 - added by order of the Loudoun County Court
      Capt. Samuel Oldham Thomas Williams overseer, N. Hazzard, Philip, Tim, Nan, Judith Other names on this portion of list - Thomas Aubrey, Thomas Pritchard, Col. Henry Lee, Bailey Washington, Geo Headen, Geo Headen Jr, John Headon, Thomas Connele, George Aubrey & Edward Taylor, Capt. Wilobuy Newton, Peter Mullins overseer,

      1765 - John McIlhaney's list
      Benjamin Clark (Clack), Spencer Clark(Clack), Nehemiah Bonham, Nehemiah Bonham Jr, Elijah Bonham (Bonham's purchased land adjoining James Oldham in Sevier, Tennessee)

      1765 Levin Powell's List of Tithables Robert Stephens, for Negro Hagar - 1
      Other names on this portion of the list: William Fitzhugh, John Harris, Thomas and Neudigate Owsley, Moses Preston, Gilbert Simpson, John Wood, Edward, William, Henry & George Taylor, John Vilett

      1765 List of Tithables
      Smarr, John; Oldham, George overseer, negroes, Tom & Rose - 4

      Other names on this portion of the list: Daneld French, John French, Thomas Gorham, William Harris, Wm. Harris, Thomas Hill, John Keen, Jacob Reed,

      1767 Capt. Wm. Douglass Tithables #7:
      George Oldham - 1
      Robert Stephens (Levy Free); negros Hagar & Win -2
      William Stephens, Sampson Stephens - 2
      John Smarr; James Oldham; William Saunders, Negroes Tom & Rose - 5 (this is the same John Smarr that George Oldham was with, in 1765 list. These names all appear on the same page with only one name separating William Stephens and John Smarr
      Other names on this portion of the list: John Potts, Charles Conner, William Cocke, Ambrose Fox (involved in land deals with Samuel Oldham) Daniel French, John French, Peter Fox, Anthony Fox, Adam Fox, Thomas Goreham, Bartholmew Connelly, John Harris, George Herriford, Charles Dodson, John McMillion, Ralph Martin, Thomas Owsley, Wm. Owsley, John Clark, Moses Preston, Jacob Reid, Nathl. Weedon, Joshua Taylor, Richard Hill, William Taylor, Edward Taylor, John Vilet,

      1768 Leven Powell list:
      John Robinson; Spencer Clark(Clack) -2

      John Smarr; James Oldham, John Ruder; negroes Tom & Rose - 5
      Robert Stephens (levy free); Sampson Stephens, negroes, Winny & Hagar - 3 (next
      door to John Smarr)
      William Stephens - 1

      George Oldham; Thomas Richardson - 2 (25 entries down)
      other names on this list, William Taylor Sr & Jr., Joshua Botts the elder, Peter and Adam Fox, Geo. Taylor, Daniel French, John Preston, John Clark, John Potts, Jonathan Hill, Henry and John Taylor, Joshua Taylor, Henry Taylor, Richard Hill, Gilbert Simson (constable) Thomas Gorham, Bartholomew Connelly, Thomas Owsley, Wm. Owsley, John Harris, William Oldachre, Isaac Oldachre, Samuel Bishop,Thomas Hill, William Read,Burr Harriss, Sampson Turley, John Turley, Bayley Washington, Charles Presley, John Minor.

      1769 List of Tithables

      George Oldham; Jas. Oldham -2 (would seem they just might be related)

      1770 list of Tithables

      Robert Stephens (Levy Free), negroes Harry & Hagar - 2; 10 scalps
      William Stephens - 1; 5 scalps (next door)
      John Smarr; Jas. Oldham; Negroes Tom & Rosie - 4; 20 scalps

      Foushee Tebbs's vizt. George Oldham Overseer; negros 6 named -7; 35 scalps Richard Stephens, Richd. Stephens, John Jones, negro George -4; 20 scalps

      1771 List of Tithables taken in Shelburne Parish (scalps)
      George Oldham, -1; 5 scalps

      1772 List of Tithables

      Sampson Stephens - 1
      Other names James Preston, Dennis Stephens, Thomas Goreham, Gilbert Simpson, William Tylor Sr & Sr, Samuel Taylor, Samuel Bishop, Samuel Bonham, Aaron Bonham, John Martin, Asahal Martin, Jas Oldridge, Jasper Ball,

      1773 Lewis' list of Tithables for Shelburne Parish

      William Berkley's tithes:
      James Oldham overseer, Negro Hagor -2 (It should be noted that Wm. Berkley (b. abt 1739 Fauquier Co VA d.1818 Scott Co. KY) was married to Leah Stephens' aunt, Sarah Stephens daughter of Robert and Ann Dent Stephens. William and Sarah were married about 1760.)

      William Stephens - 1 (next on list after Berkley's tithes)
      Other names on this portion of the list: Nathan Potts, Edward Burton, John Bishop, Samuel Potts,Jacob Reed, John and Thomas Vilett, Daniel French, Andrew and Thomas Bayly,

      1773 Samuel Love's list of Tithables
      George Oldham; Joseph Gold -2
      other names on this portion of the list; Bailey Washington of Stafford, Ann Gorham, George Hariss (now overseer for Foushee Tebbs) Gabriel Fox, Joshua Harriss, Daniel Conner, Richard Headen, Elisha Headen, Samuel Headen, George Deaden, Jr.,

      1774 List of Tithables:
      George Oldham; Joseph Gold -2

      1774 List of Tithables taken for Shelborn Parish
      James Oldham; lives with Wm. Barkley -1 (Uncle in law of Leah Stephens)

      Sampson Stephens -1 (about 15 entries down from James)

      1775 list of Tithables for Shelburne Parish taken by Thomas Lewis
      James Oldham - 1
      Sampson Stephens - 1 (about 20 entries down from James)

      1775 List of Tithables
      George Oldham, Joseph Gold -2

      1776 List of Tithables Chas Eskridge List
      George Oldham & negro Obey - 2

      1777 List of Tithables in Cameron Parish
      Martin Ollum -1

      John Smarr; Robert Smarr - 7

      1776 / 1777 A list of Tithables and Wheel carriages in Cameron Parish taken by Saml. Love for the year 1776 (1777 written on top of 1776) (This list is in the group of tithables lists for 1779 on pages 887-895)
      George Oldham; Joseph Gold -2

      1779 List of Tithables taken by Har; Lane
      Geo. Oldham, Negro Oba -2

      1780 List of Tithables in Cameron Parish taken by Saml. Love Jr
      George Oldham, negro Obediah -2

      1781 List of Tithables taken by John Orr
      Geo: Oldham, negro Obed -2

      1782a Second Battalion
      Oldham, George & negro Obed

      1783b Second Battalion
      Oldham, George


      1788a Third Battalion
      Oldham, George

      1792a Second Battalion
      Oldham, George

      1793c First Battalion
      Oldham, William

      1794b Second Battalion
      Oldham, George residing with John Turly (of Sampson) and Benjamin Manly

      1795b Second Battalion
      Oldham George

      1796b Cameron Parish (Second Battalion)
      Oldham, George

      1797b Cameron Parish (Second Battalion)
      Oldham, George
      Oldham, John


      According to the Tithable Lists, James Oldham was the overseer for Wm. Barkley/Berkley in 1773. William Berkley was married to Sarah Stephens, daughter of Robert Stephens of Loudoun County, Virginia. On 2 January 1774, James and Leah were married in Shelburne Parish, Loudoun County, Virginia. The marriage was performed by Rev. David Griffith. The marriage entry is found in Reverend Griffith's personal account book, in which he had recorded his business transactions, salary paid to him (usually in pounds of tobacco), and the fees he received for performing marriages and funerals. Perhaps James and Leah's relationship began while James was working for William Berkley."

      T. K. Carnmell (1908; 1963), in his publication Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Their Descendants, page 232, notes;

      "Be it remembered that at the house of Edward Beeson the 19th day of May, 1772, a Commission of the Peace and a Commission of Oyer and Terminer, from his excellency Lord Dunmore, dated the 17th day of April in the year aforesaid, directed to Ralph Wormley, Jacob Hite, Van Swearingen, Thos. Rutherford, Adam Stephen, John Neville, Thos. Swearingen, Samuel Washington, James Nourse, Wm. Little, Robert Stephen, John Briscoe, Hugh Lyle, James Strode, Wm. Morgan, Robt. Stogdon, JAmes Seaton, Robert
      Carter, Willis and Thos. Robinson." The Justices were duly sworn, and proceeded with the duties of their first term. William Drew was the first clerk, Adam Stephen, sheriff, Saml Oldham Depty.,Alexander White, Depty, Kings Atty: James Keith (Clerk of Frederick Co.) John Magill, Geo. Brent, Geo. Johnston, Phillip Pendleton and Alexander White, attorneys, were admitted to practice."

      It is interesting to note that Capt. Samuel Oldham was appointed as a deputy Sherriff, serving with Adam Stephen, John Neville (who may be the same John Neville associated with other early Virginia Oldham families), Robert Stephens and Jacob Hite. Please note this was signed by the Clerk of Frederick County, Virginia.

      John Smarr, (1712 - December 1794) appears to be the John Smarr found in Loudoun County, Virginia during the time James and George Oldham were living there, as both are listed as Overseer for John Smarr on the Tithables lists. John Smarr married Sarah Pritchard born about 1762. Sarah was the daughter of Thomas and Rachel Davis Prichard of Loudoun County, Virginia. John Smarr, son of Andrew and Elishe Smaw, was married at least once before he married Sarah Pritchard. He married (1) Sarah Pearl, daughter of William Pearl of Fauquier County, Virginia. She was still living May 24, 1785 when her father made his will. He married second Sarah Pritchard before 1789, daughter of Thomas Pritchard and Rachel Davis. The Pritchard/Pritchart descendants came to Indiana during the same time period as the James and Leah Oldham family.

      In order to more closely determine the area of Loudoun County, Virginia James and Leah Stephens Oldham lived in, I researched the Loudoun County records in regard to John Smarr. On September 2, 1769, one-half acre of land was deeded by William West to Benjamin Hutchison, John Smarr, John Shippey and William Berkley, Trustees of the Little River Baptist Church in Loudoun County. The first church was a one-room log building that already stood on the site and was also used as school. This lot was located about 1-1/2 miles northwest of the present town of Aldie, Virginia. The original lot contained a one room log building which had been used as a school house. The deed allowed the building could be used "as a public meeting house for the Worship of Almighty God and the Baptist profession." The original purchase price was one shilling ($0.12) in current money. A second church was erected on a permanent site on Braddock Road, during October 1775. This information provides clues to the location of James and George Oldham while they were overseers for John Smarr. The Smarr plantation would have been near present day Aldie, Virginia.

      From Morgan Edwards' 1772 Virginia Notebook: LITTLE-RIVER (Regular)

      So called from a branch of Goose-creek (and that empties into the Potowmak) near to which the meeting house is, in Cameron parish, Lowden county, 212 miles nbw from Williamsburg and 230 ssw from Philadelphia. It consists of 5 branches; one near Little-river where is a house 25 feet by 20, built in 1767 on land given by Wm West; another at Goose-creek; another at Shenadore; Bull-run another; another at Monacacy in Maryland in each of which places is a meeting house. The families about whereof 362 persons are baptized and in communion which is celebrated once a quarter in each branch viz 5. Ruling elders, laying on of hands, and devoting children admitted. ..."John S. Moore, ed. The Virginia Baptist Register, No. 18, 1979. Richmond, Va.: Virginia Baptist Historical Society, pg. 867.

      The village of Aldie is located on Ashby's Gap Turnpike. Ashby's Gap is a wind gap in the Blue Ridge Mountain on the border of Clarke County, Loudoun County and Fauquier County in Virginia. The gap is traversed by U.S. Route 50. The Appalachian trail also passes across the gap. The gap serves as the western demarcation point for
      the border between Fauquier and Loudoun, originally marked by a "double-bodied poplar tree standing in or near the middle of the thoroughfare of Ashby's Gap on the top of the Blue Ridge."

      Figure . John Smarr and the Village of Aldie, Virginia


      Originally known as the "Upper Thoroughfare of the Blue Ridge", the area was later named "Ashby's Bent" when Thomas Ashby received lands along Goose Creek, and settled Paris, Virginia at the eastern entrance to the gap. Later it came to be called Ashby's Gap. While visiting the library in Barren County, Kentucky, I came across a copy of the Shenandoah Day Store ledger from 176? It lists a Moses Oldham, driving for Capt. John Ashby and contains many familiar names such as James Wood, Daniel Morgan, Jeremiah Woods, Taliaferro, William Wood, Grubb, George Routt, and Mrs. Moses Oldham.

      If James and George Oldham, as well as Robert, Richard, William and Sampson Stephens were all living in close proximity to the John Smarr family, it would appear they would be in the section of Loudoun County included in this map. Since Captain Samuel Oldham also appears nearby on the Tithable Lists, we must also keep him in consideration as part of the same Oldham family. Although the map is from 1839, the general features will still assist in locating the proper area of Loudoun County for our Oldham family.

      Given the alignment and history of Loudoun and Fauquier Counties, it is possible James(95) came from Pennsylvania, Maryland or Fauquier County, Virginia. There were several Oldham families in Fauquier County during this time period. Since James(95) and George Oldham seem to be closely aligned with the Stephens families of Loudoun County, it?s very possible this Oldham family was in the Frederick County, Virginia area near Robert Stephen?s family prior to arriving in Loudoun County.




      1839 Goose Creek area of Loudoun County, VA




      Loudoun and Fauquier, VA by M. Scheel

      John Smarr died between Jun 9 1794, when he signed his will, and Jun 8, 1795, when the will was recorded at Leesburg, Loudoun County, Virginia. The spelling of the name SMAW was changed to Smarr in Fairfax and Loudoun Counties by court clerks; all family court records are signed only with their mark. This portion of the Smarr family later moved to North Carolina. .

      A review of the Loudoun County Deed books shows several Oldham deeds. No wills have been found for anyone named Oldham in Loudoun County.

      The following information is shown in the land records of Loudoun County, Virginia. The Samuel Oldham mentioned in these transactions is Colonel Samuel Oldham who married Elizabeth Stork Newton and purportedly had no children

      7th/8th Jun 1763 Deed Book C (part II) pg 639-643; William Oldham, William Sydnor, Fortunatus Sydnor, James Ball witness indenture for land on the south side of Goose Creek. (This appears to be the William Oldham who married Susan Sydnor, sister of Fortunatus Sydnor)

      5 Nov 1763 Deed Book D pg 101; Know all men...I Samuel Oldham of Westmoreland

      County have sold .....three negro slaves.....witness Sampson Turley at a court held 15 Feb 1764 sale proved ordered recorded.

      12 Oct 1768; Mary (her X mark) Ollen bill of sale between Joseph Collins and Colo. James Hamilton.

      9th/10th Oct 1769 Deed Book G pg 188-191; Indenture between Amos Fox and Gabriel Fox for land purchased by Amos Fox of Samuel Oldham and Martha his wife
      by deed bearing date 18 Aug 1764.....

      13 Jan 1773 Deed Book I pg 239-242 William Auton signed as witness on indenture between James Abbett and John Thornton

      1 May 1774 Deeds Book K, pg 213-215 Indenture between Gabriel Fox and Ann his wife and Amos Fox for land which Amos Fox had purchased from Samuel Oldham and his wife Martha bearing date 18 Aug 1764, which said Oldham purchased from Thomas Johnston and Elizabeth his wife of county of Caroline by deed bearing date 28 Jun 1749, beginning at white oak for a corner by Difficult Run......part of the same in Parish of Cameron and the other part in Parish of Truro in County of Fairfax.

      10 Nov 1774 Deed Book K pg 374-378 Indenture between Amos Fox and Gabriel Fox for land which Amos Fox had purchased from Samuel Oldham and his wife Martha bearing date 18 Aug 1764, which said Oldham purchased from Thomas Johnston and Elizabeth his wife of county of Caroline by deed bearing date 28 Jun 1749. . . beginning at white oak for a corner by Difficult Run......part of the same in Parish of Cameron and the other part in Parish of Truro in County of Fairfax.

      13 Feb 1777 Deed Book L pg 328-329 Indenture between Amos Fox and Ann his wife and William Stone of Fairfax Virginia for the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia land ......which Amos Fox purchased from Capt. Samuel Oldham

      14 Oct 1782 Deed Book N pg 378-380 Indenture between Nimrod Morris of Cameron Parish Loudoun Co and Ambrose Fox of same Parish and County...witnessed by George Oldham

      10 Mar 1787 1787-1788 Deeds Power of attorney from Samuel Oldham of King George County, Virginia to Thomas Lewis

      13 Mar 1787 1792-1793 Deeds, pg 78-82 Indenture between William Stone and Amos Fox for land Fox had purchased from Samuel Oldham; witnessed by Thomas Oden

      1 Jun 1789 1789-1790 Deeds, pg 418-421 Indenture mentions Widow Ollum's fence (This could be Susan Sydnor Oldham, William Oldham died 1779, reportedly in Northumberland County, Virginia)

      10 Sep 1792 1792-1793 Deeds, pg 74-76 Amos Fox sells land to Richard Bland Lee that he purchased from Samuel Oldham.

      14 Oct 1793 Deeds 1795-1796 pg 355-358 John (his x mark) Oldham signs as witness on indenture between Alderson Weekes, Isaac Gochner of Frederick Co and Thomas Owsley for land at Goose Creek.

      So now we have several Oldhams in the Shenandoah/Loudoun area - Samuel, William, James, George and Moses. Unfortunately, these were very popular names among the Oldham families in the Northern Neck of Virginia.

      To date I have been unable to document the relationship of George Oldham of Loudoun County, Virginia with James who married Leah Stephens Oldham. George appears to have remained in Loudoun County until at least 1797 and may have had a son John, who appears on the Tax Lists in Cameron Parish (Second Battalion) with George in 1797. In 1793 a William Oldham appears on the First Battalion Personal Property Tax list. His relationship is also unknown. James and Leah Oldham named their sons George, John, William, James and Moses. Of course, these seem to be popular names in Northern Virginia during this time period.


      Revolutionary War Resolutions of Loudoun County

      5th Virginia Continental Line Uniform

      The story of the Revolution and the causes which led to that great event span decades of points and counter-points that have filled numerous history books from then until now. If, in the words of James W. Head ...
      "...it can be shown that Loudoun County was most forward in resisting the arbitrary aggressions of the British government and that the valor and patriotism she evidenced during the Revolution was equal to that of her sister counties, who had suffered with her under the yoke of British oppression, then the primary object of this sketch will be accomplished. Her blood and treasure were freely dedicated to the cause of liberty and, having once entered the Revolution, she determined to persevere in the struggle until every resource was exhausted. Armed with flint-lock muskets of small bore and with long-barreled rifles which they loaded from the muzzle by the use of the ramrod; equipped with powder horn, charges made of cane for loading, bullet molds and wadding, bravely arrayed in homespun of blue, and belted with cutlass and broadsword by the side, cockade on the hat and courage in the heart, her revolutionary soldiers marched to the music of fife and drum into battle for freedom against the power and might of the mother country."
      The original Loudoun County Resolves disappeared sometime in the past 230 years. In 1877, the following article appeared in a Leesburg newspaper under the caption "Loudoun County a Hundred Years Ago":
      "Major B. P. Nolan, grandson of Burr Powell, has just put us in possession of a verified copy of the proceedings of a public meeting held at Leesburg, Loudoun County, on the 14th of June, 1774, nearly one hundred and five years ago. It is interesting, not merely for its antiquity but as showing the spirit of independence that animated the breasts of our liberty-loving countrymen two years before the Declaration of American Independence in 1776. The original* document was found among the papers of Col. Leven Powell, at one time member of Congress from this district, who died in 1810. His son, Burr Powell, forwarded a copy to R. H. Lee, Esq., who in 1826 was about to publish a second edition of his 'Memoirs of the Life of R. H. Lee,' of Revolutionary fame." (*Note: All of the Lee papers, with the exception of a few, were destroyed in the great fire at the University of Virginia in 1895 where they had been archived. If the original copy of the Loudoun Resolves was among those papers, it probably perished with them.)
      The proceedings of the resolutions are as follows:
      "Public Meeting in Loudoun in 1774"

      "At a meeting of the Freeholders and other inhabitants of the County of Loudoun, in the Colony of Virginia, held at the Court-House in Leesburg the 14th of June, 1774, F. Peyton, Esq., in the Chair, to consider the most effectual method to preserve the rights and liberties of North America, and relieve our brethren of Boston, suffering under the most oppressive and tyrannical Act of the British Parliament, made in the 14th year of his present Majesty's reign, whereby their Harbor is blocked up, their commerce totally obstructed, their property rendered useless-
      "Resolved, That we will always cheerfully submit to such prerogatives as his Majesty has a right, by law, to exercise, as Sovereign of the British Dominions, and to no others.
      "Resolved, That it is beneath the dignity of freemen to submit to any tax not imposed on them in the usual manner, by representatives of their own choosing.
      "Resolved, That the Act of the British Parliament, above mentioned, is utterly repugnant to the fundamental laws of justice, in punishing persons without even the form of a trial; but a despotic exertion of unconstitutional power designedly calculated to enslave a free and loyal people.
      "Resolved, That the enforcing the execution of the said Act of Parliament by a military power, must have a necessary tendency to raise a civil war, and that we will, with our lives and fortunes, assist and support our suffering brethren, of Boston, and every part of North America that may fall under the immediate hand of oppression, until a redress of all our grievances shall be procured, and our common liberties established on a permanent foundation.
      "Resolved, That the East India Company, by exporting their tea from England to America, whilst subject to a tax imposed thereon by the British Parliament, have evidently designed to fix on the Americans those chains forged for them by a venal ministry, and have thereby rendered themselves odious and detestable throughout all America. It is, therefore, the unanimous opinion of this meeting not to purchase any tea or other East India commodity whatever, imported after the first of this Month.
      "Resolved, That we will have no commercial intercourse with Great Britain until the above mentioned act of Parliament shall be totally repealed, and the right of regulating the internal policy of North America by a British Parliament shall be absolutely and positively given up.
      "Resolved, That Thompson Mason, Esq. and Francis Peyton, Esq., be appointed to represent the County at a general meeting to be held at Williamsburg on the 1st day of August next, to take the sense of this Colony at large on the subject of the preceding resolves, and that they, together with Leven Powell, William Ellzey, John Thornton, George Johnston, and Samuel Levi, of any three of them, be a committee to correspond with the several committees appointed for this purpose.
      "Signed by John Morton, James Nolan, Thomas Ray, Samuel Peugh, Thomas Drake, William Nomail, William Booram, Thomas Luttrell, Benj. Isaac Humphrey, James Brair, Samuel Mills, Poins Awsley, Joshua Singleton, John Kendrick, Jonathan Drake, Edward O'Neal, Matthew Rust, Francis Triplett, Barney Sims, Joseph Combs, John Sims, John Peyton Harrison, Samuel Butler, Robert Combs, Thomas Chinn, Stephen Combs, Appollos Cooper, Samuel Henderson, L. Hancock, Benjamin Overfield, John McVicker, Adam Sangater, Simon Triplett, Bazzell Roads, John Wildey, James Graydey, Joseph Bayley Thomas Awsley, Isaac Sanders, John Reardon, Thos. Williams, Henry Awsley, John Williams, Edward Miller, William Finnekin, Richard Hirat, Richard Hanson, James Davis, John Dunker, Jasper Grant, Thomas Williams

      Revolutionary Committees
      The County Committee of Loudoun for 1774 - 1775 was composed of the following members:
      Francis Feyton, Leven Powell, Josias Clapham, William Smith, Thomas Lewis, Robert Jamison, Anthony Russell, Hardage Lane, John Thomas, John Lewis, George Johnston, James Lane, Thomas Shore, George Johnston, Jacob Reed (clerk).
      The appended findings of this as well as a later committee exemplify the work of these Revolutionary bodies.
      "At a meeting of the Committee of Loudoun County, held at Leesburg on Friday, May 26, 1775. --
      "The Committee, taking into consideration the conduct of the Governour relative to the powder which was, by his express orders, taken secretly out of the publick Magazine belonging to this Colony, in the night of the twentieth ult., and carried on board the Magdaline schooner.
      "Resolved, nemine contra dicente, That his Lordship, by this and other parts of his conduct which have lately transpired, has not only forfeit the confidence of the good people of this Colony, but that he may be justly esteemed an enemy to America; and that as well his excuse published in his Proclamation of the fourth instant, as his verbal answer to the address presented him on that occasion by the city of Williamsburgh, are unsatisfactory and evasive, and reflect, in our opinion, great dishonour on the General Assembly and inhabitants of this Colony, as from the latter a suspicion may be easily deduced, that the Representatives of the people are not competent judges of the place wherein arms and ammunition, intended for the defense of the Colony, may be safely lodged, and that the inhabitants (unlike other subjects) can not, in prudence, be trusted with the means necessary for their protection from insurrection, or even evasion; so in the former a very heavy charge exhibited against the best men among us, of seducing their fellow-subjects from their duty and allegiance; a charge, we are confident, not founded in reality, and which, we believe, is construed out of the discharge of that duty which every good man is under, to point out to his weaker countrymen, in the day of publick trial, the part they should act, and explain, on constitutional principles, the nature of their allegiance the ground of which we fervently pray may never be removed, whose force we desire may never with reason be relaxed, but yet maybe subservient to considerations of superior regard.
      "The Committee being informed by some of the officers who commanded the Troops of this County that marched on the above occasion, that the reason of their matching no farther than Fredericksburgh was, their having received repeated requests from the Honourable Peyton Randolph, Esq., to return home, assuring them that the peaceable citizens of Williamsburgh were under no apprehensions of danger, either in their persons or properties; that the publick treasury and records were perfectly safe, and that there was no necessity for their proceeding any further; three of the other Delegates appointed to the Continental Congress, the only civil power we know of in this great struggle for liberty, being of the same opinion.
      "Resolved, nemine contra dicente. That under such circumstances we approve the conduct of the said Officers and Troops.
      "Resolved, nemine contra dicente, That we cordially approve the conduct of our countrymen, Captain Patrick Henry, and the other volunteers of Hanover County, who marched under him, in making reprisals on the King's property for the trespass committed as aforesaid, and that we are determined to hazard all the blessings of this life rather than suffer the smallest injury offered to their persons or estates, on this account, to pass unrewarded with its equal punishment.
      "Resolved, nemine contra diante, That it be recommended to the Representatives of this County, as the opinion of this Committee, that they by no means agree to the reprisals, taken as aforesaid, being returned.
      "Ordered, That the clerk transmit immediately a copy of the preceding resolves to the Printers of the Virginia and Pennsylvania gazettes, to be published.
      "By order of the Committee.
      "GEORGE JOHNSTON, Clerk."
      Not a few citizens dissented, and on the session held 14 May 1776 the court recorded:
      "Richard Morlan being summoned to appear before this Committee, for speaking words inimical to the liberties of America, and tending to discourage a Minute-man from returning to his duty; and also publickly declaring he would not muster, and if fined would oppose the collection of the fine with his gun: The charge being proved against him, and he heard in his defense, the Committee think proper to hold the said Morlan
      up to the publick as an enemy to their rights and liberties; and have ordered that this resolution be published in the Virginia Gazette.
      "CHRISTOPHER GREENUP, Clerk."
      However, the county was turned toward the course of Independence, as evidenced by the proceedings of the court when it convened again at the next quarter:
      Aug. 12th. 1776 -- IN PRIMO ANNO AMERICA LIBERATE
      At a meeting of the Justices of Loudoun County at the Courthouse on Monday the 12th day of August 1776.
      Present: Josias Clapham, George West, Francis Peyton, Thomas Lewis and Samuel Love, Gent.
      The Path agreed upon by the Hon. Convention was presented and read. Whereupon George West and Francis Peyton administered the Oath to Josias Clapham Gt. and he administered the said Oath to the said George West, Francis Peyton, George Lewis and Samuel Love, Gent.
      The Declaration of Independence by the Hon. Congress was read at the Court-house door, by the sheriff pursuant to the order of the Governor and Council of Virginia.
      Charles Binns was sworn Clerk of this Court, pursuant to an ordinance of Convention. Philip Noland Esq. was sworn Sheriff of this County pursuant to an an Ordinance of Convention, and on his motion Ralph Murray and Christopher Parfect were sworn his Deputies.
      After transacting the ordinary business before the Court, the Court adjourned till Court In course.
      (Signed) Josias Clapham, Clerk
      From the Loudoun County Revolutionary War files of the Thomas Balch Library, Leesburg, VA
      Also extracts from "The History and Comprehensive Description of Loudoun County, Virginia" by James W. Head
      published in 1908 by Park View Press, 186 pgs. Copy in the Thomas Balch Library.


      One researcher found a record of Revolutionary War Service for James Oldham of

      Loudoun County, Virginia. The record shows a James Oldham serving in the 4th
      Virginia Militia under Col Burgess Ball. The DAR application of Mae Starr states James served in the 5th Virginia Regiment, Continental Line from Sep 28 1776 to Oct 28 1776; Nov 28, 1776 to Apr 1, 1777 and Aug 1776 to May 1777 commanded by Lt. Col Josiah Parker. A review of the military records for the 4th Virginia Regt, under Burgess Ball does show the service of a James Oldham, George Oldham, Richard Stephens and John Smarr. All four of these men are also shown together on the Tax Rolls of Loudoun County, Virginia. Unfortunately, the Regimental records also show the death of a James Oldham and Richard Stephens on 13 December 1776 in a skirmish leading up to the Battle of Trenton. Ms. Starr shows the information was found in the Federal Military Record, Kansas City, Kansas pg 594 and NARA .

      Mrs. Carrie Call, in correspondence to Mrs. Helen Quinn noted "James Oldham, the father of Stephen, John and James, Jr. died at the age of 77 years. (My grandmother Elizabeth Oldham, daughter of John Oldham, told me that her grandfather, James Oldham, fought in the Revolutionary War, but I could never find any record of this from the War Department in Washington D.C., so I had no proof of his service.)"

      I found records for a James, Conway, Richard, Isaac and George Oldham located in the 5th Virginia Regiment, under different commanders. James and Richard Stephens were normally found together in the muster rolls.

      Records show Richard Oldham served under Lt. William Stephens in the 5th Virginia. General William Stephens was the father of Sampson and Leah Stephens. I?m unsure whether Lt. William Stephens and General William Stephens are the same person, as I have not pursued that lineage. I?ve also not been able to determine if the George Oldham listed in this unit was Richard?s brother of a different George Oldham. There was also a George Oaldham who served with the Continental Army and is detailed in later research on the Oldham?s of Virginia. Also serving from the Maryland, Pennsylvania, Northern Virginia area were Isaac, Edward and James Oldham.






      5th VA Regt.August 1776 James Oldham listed on line 16




      5th VA May 1777 James Oldham Line 20


      Both James Oldham and Richard Stephens disappear from the Loudoun County, Virginia tax rolls after 1776. I have only found one James Oldham in the early Loudoun County records. This leaves a few obvious possibilities; there was more than one James Oldham associated with Richard Stephens, there was more than one James Oldham in Loudoun County during this time period; there was a James Oldham associated with Richard Stephens that wasn?t counted in the Tithables or someone other than James Oldham was killed in the skirmish of 13 December 1776 and was erroneously identified as James Oldham of Loudoun County.

      Our James is noted in the Lord Fairfax Lease as being from Loudoun County, but a search of the available early Loudoun County, Virginia land records does not show any land transactions for James Oldham. James later appears with his family in the Henry County, Virginia area with Sampson and John Stephens, brothers of Richard Stephens. But these facts support the fact James did not die during the Revolutionary War.

      Only two individuals have filed for Daughters of the American Revolution membership for James who died in Fayette County, Indiana in 1827. Copies of their applications were approved based on erroneous information. Both ladies filed using a claim voucher for James of Caswell County, North Carolina.



      Figure . Caswell County, North Carolina Certificate of Service
      Revolutionary War

      Also found in the Revolutionary War records of Loudoun County, Virginia is William Longley, son of Joseph Longley, originally of Hunterdon County, New Jersey. In 1780 William was drafted into the Virginia Troops and served until February 1782. William, Joseph and Joel Longley left Loudoun County and went to Shenandoah County, then Rockingham County, next Washington County , followed by Sevier County, Tennessee and later McMinn and Polk County, Tennessee. While in Sevier County, Tennessee, William?s son Jonathon married Sarah Oldham, in the home of her father, James Oldham.





      The children of Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham, with the exception of Moses and George, left Caswell County, North Carolina before the 1790 census and moved to the 96th District, Pendleton County, South Carolina.

      In December 1997, Helen Quinn researched at the Raleigh, North Carolina Archives. she was able to locate Sampson Stephens in Rowan County, North Carolina, but not James and Leah. Nor did she didn't find a deed for James and Leah's land purchase in what was to become Sevier County, Tennessee. I checked the State grants and have also come up empty handed. How did James obtain the land on the French Broad and who issued the original deed? We still need to find a document with his signature on it.

      William Stephens filed land in Caswell County, North Carolina the same day as one of the Oldham boys........there are also Stephens in 96th, Pendleton county, South Carolina at the same time as well as in early Kentucky with the Oldhams......I have been unable to determine if they are part of the same Stephens family.

      We have turned our research efforts back toward Pittsylvania, Henry and Loudoun Counties in Virginia again, and continue to attempt to verify who the father of this James Oldham is.

      In reviewing the Loudoun and Pittsylvania/Henry County, Virginia records, there is another Oldham family living in the Henry County area at the same time as James Oldham.

      By 1778 James and Leah appear to have moved their family to Henry/Pittsylvania County, Virginia (located just north of Caswell County, North Carolina). James is found in the tax lists and deeds of Henry County, as are Sampson and William Stephens and a John Oldham, who appears to have married Elizabeth Cox. .

      A 1780 List of Survey?s? in Henry County, Virginia, shows James Oldham listed as having a deed for 236 acres on Home Creek. The next deed is for John Stephens, 233 acres on Home Creek, Henry County, Virginia. Sampson Stephens lives nearby. A review of microfilm of the land patients of 1785 show John Stephens patented his land; however there was no patent for James? Oldham?s land. James and Leah were in Henry County, Virginia at the same time as John and Elizabeth Cox Oldham. I found a John Oldham and a Thomas Oldham (possibly Ollum?) also listed on Home Creek in the survey. Home Creek is a small creek near the current town of Sandy Levels, Virginia and it would seem if they both lived on the same creek, they most likely are related to each other.

      John Oldham found in Henry County, Virginia is believed to have been born about 1738 in Northumberland County, Virginia, died in Henry County, Virginia. His estate was inventoried and appraised 23 October 1801 and the account current filed 29 November 1802. He was married to Elizabeth Cox, daughter of Francis and Mary Cox. Elizabeth Cox Oldham?s will was probated11 September 1837, the inventory and appraisal were returned to the court 17 November 1837 and the account current was filed 23 November 1839 in Henry County, Virginia.

      In 1767 a John Oldham petitioned to build a water grist mill on Landy(Sandy) Creek in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. He was given permission to build on Ivory Island. In the same court records for May Court, 1775, there was a motion of John Oldham with the consent of John Blagg, owner of land on Leatherwood Creek, to build a water grist mill. In the 1780?s Sampson Stephens would hold land on this same creek. It should be noted that as early as 1778, both John Blagg and John Oldham were paying taxes in Henry County, Virginia. Henry County was part of Pittsylvania County until 1776-77.


      Elizabeth Cox may have been a second wife of John Oldham, based on the marriage bond for John?s daughter Winifred. When she married in 1813, she was listed as ?Not of Age? and Elizabeth Cox Oldham referred to her as ?my beloved daughter? in her will, leaving Winifred two parcels of land, one of 60 acres and the other 32 acres, before her ?estate was to be sold and equally divided among her children living or dead and their heirs.? In J. L. Crawford?s book, ?Whence We Came? he noted that J. Hoyle Mayfield, of Bakersfield, California, wrote in February 1990 that he, among others, had believed that John Oldham had married a Rachel Martin, prior to his marriage to Elizabeth Cox.?

      Perhaps that is the reason Francis Cox, father of Elizabeth, did not make a deed of gift to her, of the property which John and Elizabeth were living on until 26 October 1801 ? three days after the inventory and appraisal of John?s estate. This land was part of Francis Cox?s plantation.

      In the Account Current for Elizabeth Cox Oldham, Colonel Joseph Martin was named as a legatee and received $381.15.18. I have found few marriages between the Martin and Oldham families during this time period.

      Several of John's children moved on to Montgomery County, Kentucky and later emigrated to Calloway County, Missouri with other Oldham families. This would seem to lead to a conclusion that John and Elizabeth's family could be related to Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham, since several from that group ended up in Montgomery County, Kentucky about the same time. Yet according to this John Oldham's father?s will, his sisters are Winifred and Mary Ann who moved to Pendleton County, South Carolina. Several children of the Richard and Elizabeth Bayse Oldham family are thought to have settled in Pendleton County, South Carolina area. This is noted in court documents filed by John's daughter's husband, Samuel Elliott. There was some question over slaves left to John and his sisters in their father's will.

      A document dated 29 Dec 1792, in Henry CO, VA (Deed Book-V, p.7) is found in relation to the estate of John
    Person ID I2054  oldham
    Last Modified 23 Sep 2017 

    Mother OLDHAM, Loudoun County 
    Family ID F1893  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family STEPHENS, Leah,   b. Abt 1752, North Carolina Or Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1827, Fayette County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years) 
    Married 2 Jan 1774  Shelbourne Parish, Loudoun County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • Author: debraanderson15
      http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.oldham/430.6/mb.ashx
      Message Board Post:

      This is an old thread but hoping something comes of it...

      I am researching 'my' James Oldham who marr to Leah Stephens on 2 Jan 1774 in Shelburne Parish, Loudoun CO, VA -- Marriage was performed by Rev. David Griffith. ((These marriages were found in Rev. Griffith's personal account book, in which he recorded his business transactions, salary paid to him (usually in pounds of tobacco) and the fees he received for performing marriages and funerals))
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, Stephen,   b. 4 Nov 1774, Loudoun County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 May 1834, Lyonsville, Fayette County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Moses A.,   b. Abt 1776, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jun 1853, Liberty, Union County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)
     3. OLDHAM, George Reverend,   b. 7 Jun 1779, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 1828, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
     4. OLDHAM, William D.,   b. 5 Jun 1783, Pittsylvania County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Oct 1854, Kirkville, Wapello County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     5. OLDHAM, John,   b. Abt 1785, Henry County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Nov 1877, Howard County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 92 years)
     6. OLDHAM, Nancy,   b. Abt 1786, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. OLDHAM, Sarah,   b. Abt 1791, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1872, Polk County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 81 years)
     8. OLDHAM, James Jr.,   b. 7 Dec 1794, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 May 1853, Rush County, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     9. OLDHAM, Mary,   b. Abt 1800, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1827, Lauderdale County, Alabama, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 26 years)
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F591  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1768 - Loudoun County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 2 Jan 1774 - Shelbourne Parish, Loudoun County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Lease entered in Frederick County, Virginia, USA - 1776 - Shenandoah County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1780 - Home Creek, Henry County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1782 - Pittsylvania County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1785 - Henry County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - "Territory South of the French Broad and Holston Rivers" (which included Sevier County) in 1788 and 1789 - 1788 - South of French Broad, North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 1789 - South of French Broad, North Carolina, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1795 - Oldham, Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - East Tennessee Grant #702 Book 1, page 702 225 Acres - 28 Sep 1809 - Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1810 - Jennings Twp., Fayette County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Signer of Petition from Resident of French Broad and Holston Country Regarding Indebtedness. Presented to the General Assembly in 1813. - 1813 - Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - State Manufacturing Census - 1820 - Sevier County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 22 Oct 1825 - Union County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - 14 May 1827 - Rush County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 May 1827 - Fayette County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsWill - Indiana, Wills and Probate Records, 1798-1999 - 16 Jun 1827 - Fayette County, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
     Oldham, James(95)
East Fork of the Little Pigeon
 Sevier, Tennessee
 1998
    Oldham, James(95) East Fork of the Little Pigeon Sevier, Tennessee 1998

    Documents 40 documents

    Histories 2 histories

    Miscellaneous 7 miscellaneous

    Research 5 research

    Wills Probate
    Oldham, James(95)
    Oldham, James(95)
    James Oldham Jr claim to Rush County Land after death of father James(95) Oldham

  • Sources 
    1. [S490] Helen Quinn.

    2. [S1467] Mae Isenhart Bollen Starr.

    3. [S1908] Lord Fairfax Lease, In File.

    4. [S3212] Court Records of Fayette County, Indiana 1819-1849, Maurice Holmes, (1978).

    5. [S3515] DAR Index Centennial Ed. Part 2.

    6. [S707] Fayette County Indiana Will Records 1819-1895, Ruth M. Slevin, (N.p.: n.p., 1970.).

    7. [S3077] Todd G. Oldham.