Oldham Family History

OLDHAM, Isaac

Male 1779 - 1851  (71 years)


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  • Name OLDHAM, Isaac 
    Born 8 Nov 1779  Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Census 7 Aug 1820  Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Land 10 Mar 1825  Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1840  Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Sec 3, 4, and 22 - 395 acres 
    Census 1850  Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 3 Sep 1851  Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried Old City Cemetery, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Notes 
    • Marcia Rothman notes: He traveled on foot with an ax and a gun, westwa rd on Zanes Trail to the present site of Cambridge, Ohio, from Ohio Count y, Virginia about July 1805. He lived at Wils Creek Valley, Cambridge, G uernsey, Ohio. He was a farmer about 1806. Src: See list in file

      f1439.ged shows alternate death date of 13 May 1863

      Oldham Jr. was born November 8, 1779 at the forks of the "Yaw", to Isaac and Sarah Oldham. Isaac lived his first seventeen years of life at the "Yaw," a name for the Youghiogeheny River in Pennsylvania. In 1796 his father, Isaac Sr, moved theohio County, Virginia, which is presently West Virginia . In the summer of 1805, Isaac Jr., at the age of 25, left home, around Wheeling, on foot, traveling westward along Zane's Trace. He carried with him an ax and a gun on his shoulder. He soon reached the Wills Creek Crossing in what is now Cambridge, Guernsey County Ohio. He could have been enticed to go westward because of the lack of money to buy his new bride a home in Virginia. At that time Virginia land was getting scarce and was expensive. Isaac had heard that Ohio, which had just recently been admitted to the union, had excellent land and could be obtained from the government at a small cost per acre. During his travel westward, for several days he had been walking alone through a nearly uninhabited country, seeking a suitable location for a future home. At the Wills Creek crossing, when he arrived there were two or three log cabins occupied by members of the Gomber, Metcalf, Hutchinson and Beatty families. There was a small clearing around the cabins, but all the territory within the present boundaries of Cambridge was thick forest. On his arrival, Isaac learned that Gomber and Beatty were planning to lay out a town. He liked the country and decided to remain for a time, mean while he looked about for a suitable location to place his home. Isaac assisted Gomber and Beatty in clearing and staking off 140 lots which is now the town of Cambridge. Isaac did not want to locate in town, being a farmer, he wanted a farm outside of town. Isaac could choose just about any location he pleased and as many acres as he wanted at one dollar and twenty- five cents and acre, to be paid for at the land office in Zanesville. We may suppose, that he roamed the woods in every direction in search of the most desirable place to settle. He chose a location in the broad Wills Creek Valley north of the newly platted town. It was second- bottom land, fertile, free from floods and well drained. Isaac purchased 160 acres of this land from the government in the spring of 1806. With the ax he had carried with him from Virginia, he cut such logs in a size he could handle alone and raised a cabin near a strong spring of water. The floor of the cabin was the earth, the roof was clapboards weighted with poles. No door was hung, the crevices between the logs were not chunked and daubed with clay. A bed was made by driving a forked stake in the ground near one corner of the cabin, the poles extended to the crevices in the walls and upon the poles a tick filled with leaves was laid. For a table he used a split section of a log into which four legs were driven and blocks of wood served as chairs. After Isaac had built his cabin and cleared a patch of ground around it, he went back to Virginia to married Sarah Marling. They were married at Roney's Point near Wheeling, Ohio County, Virginia on February 7, 1806. In February of 1807 Isaac and Sarah left for their new home in Ohio. The return was over Zane's Trace again, but this time he did not walk. Both he and Sarah rode horses, carrying a few articles to be used in housekeeping. One account says Sarah's Parents went with him and another says they bid them good-bye and wish the Godspeed. Remarking that she needed a riding switch, her father then pulled a small sprout from the root of an apple tree planted near in the ground and handed it to her. She used the switch her father gave her in their long journey. When she reached their new cabin she noticed some small roots hanging from the end of the switch. Hoping that it might take root and grow, she planted it below their cabin in the fertile soil. It did indeed grow and has continued to grow since that day. It was reported 135 years later in 1942, as being the oldest apple tree in Guernsey County and probably the oldest in the state of Ohio. Just a few years after Sarah planted the tree it began bearing apples. They were what are called "Common Fruit," yellowish and somewhat sour and ripening in the late summer. Each year the tree has borne its crop of fruit and continued to do so in1942. The main trunk is hollow and the branches are gnarled, the truck is eight feet three inches in circumference, one and a half feet from the ground. The tree is about thirty feet in height. The couple made their home in the wilderness and it was there that Sarah proved to be worthy helpmate. She made the little cabin in the wilderness as attractive as an oasis in the desert to her husband's eyes. The cabin was still standing in 1942 and near the site of the cabin was a large log barn about thirty feet by sixty feet, that Isaac built in 1820. Isaac and Sarah occupied the cabin until 1822 when they built a new home on the site of the old cabin. This new home was built of stone quarried form an adjacent hill. In the high ceiling basement mad of massive hand hewn beams was a wide wood fireplace. The above interior finishing were dressed by hand. This was the first house other than a log cabin that was built in the township. When Isaac and Sarah began housekeeping in the log cabin they had no neighbors nearer then the settlers in Cambridge town and the Indians at the Indian town less than a mile north of them. The Indians were friendly most of the time. They frequently gave them fish and game. Wild beasts were numerous in the woods and precautions was necessary both day and night for ones safety. Isaac was once pursued form the clearing to the very door of the cabin by a large panther. Isaac and Sarah were members of the Wills Creek congregation of the Reformed Dissenting Presbytery which was located near Miller's Mill in Liberty Town. Isaac served as a elder there until September of 1850. Before that they were members of the Old Seceder Church. It is written that Isaac and Sarah had twelve children. Nine of the twelve children made it to adulthood and most stayed in Ohio to their death. On August 7 of 1851 Isaac made out his will appointing his sons Moses and Marling to be the executors of his will, John Marling and James Oldham was witnesses. In his will he leaves the property they lived on to his wife Sarah, and other property in both Guernsey County and Licking County to his children along with money. He also left money to his grandchildren. Isaac lived to be seventy one years old and died September 3, 1851, just before his seventy second birthday. Sarah died June 14, 1869, ten days after her 85th birthday. Her obituary reads "Mrs. Sarah Oldham, 85 years of age. She was one of the first settlers of this county, having lived 62 years where she died. After a long toilsome life she rests from her labors." After Sarah death her last will and testament was lost, or destroyed by some unknown means. This will was made out by Thomas Oldham at her request. As a witness in court he testified, " Sarah Oldham at the time of her death lived in Cambridge township and she died on the 13th day of June 1869. I was at the residence of Mrs. Sarah Oldham about the last of March or first of June 1869 and at that time wrote a will for her, which was done at the request of her sons, it being the remodeling of a former will written by John McCall. This will was a new will.. She desired me to change the old will. The suggestion was made in her room and in her presence that certain alterations be made in her will or in other words I was asked if I would make certain alterations that she desired in her will. I then wrote a new instrument making the alterations she desired. I took the will after it was written and went in her room, there being no other person present but herself and there read the will to her. She objected to a bequest of three hundred dollars made to her son Thomas that being the mount in the old will and upon my suggesting an inter lunation in that particular she said no saying as that amount was already written there to let it stand as written and stating that all the other changes made was as she desired. ............... Her grandchildren was the last to see her will and testified the following..... " I Rachel J Long of lawful age, .......I was acquainted with Sarah Oldham, deceased at the time of her death, she was my grandmother. I was at the house of grandmother where she died on the Monday after her death. On that day I saw a will that was executed by my grandmother. I saw said will in a bureau drawer in the room where she died and was then a corpse. It was wrapped up in a piece of newspaper in a pocket book. I opened it and looked at it, but did not read it. I glanced over it and saw what it was , saw that it was grandmother's will. The will was sighed by Sarah Oldham and signed by William Garey and Thomas Oldham as witness. After we looked at it, we closed it up and put it back in the drawer, closed up in the pocket book as it was. My sister Elizabeth Baxter was with me. I did not see the will afterwards." "I Sarah Elizabeth Baxter, of lawful age............depose and say That I knew Sarah Oldham my grandmother I was at her house where she died after her death. I was there at the time she died and remained there until after she was buried. On Monday evening after her death I saw a will in the top drawer of a bureau that stood in the corner of the room where she died, the will was in a pocket book and the pocket book was wrapped up with newspaper around it. I did not read the will through, but examined it enough to know that it was Sarah Oldham's will. It was signed by Sarah Oldham and William Garey and Thomas Oldham. The date of the will was in March 1869 but I do not recollect the day of the month. I did not know the hand writing of that will. My sister Rachel Long was present when I looked at the will. My sister first opened the pocket book and after we looked at the will she put it back in the pocket book and then put the pocket book back in the drawer. I know the pocket book to be grandmother's. I have not seen that will since. Marling Oldham was called to witness, " I Marling Oldham of lawful age ..... That I am a son of Sarah Oldham, deceased. On Wednesday evening before her death, I was at her house and saw her then and at that time she told me she had executed a will and that it was in her pocket book and she then requested my brother Samuel and I to execute the will after her decease. She did not state where the pocket book was. I know at the time where she kept her pocket book having done all her business. I saw the pocket book in the bureau drawer frequently. The bureau stood at the foot of the bed in the room she occupied. On Tuesday evening after the funeral of my mother I made search for the will and I found the pocket book in the top drawer of the bureau where it had usually been kept and examined the pocket book but found no will in it. I searched the bureau through where I thought it would likely and could not find the will. My brother John made further search through the house but I left before he finished. None of us boys have been able to find the will after search. I never saw the will and did not know what was in it until after the death of mother and then only from hear say. Mother had no other pocket book than this one that was kept in the drawer. From the statements of Thomas Oldham and William Garey, witnesses of the will of Sarah Oldham the court reconstructed Sarah Oldham's will as the following: I, Sarah Oldham of Guernsey County, state of Ohio, being in my usual and good state of mind, do here in, after the payment of my funeral expenses and debts, would resign my body to the grave and bequeath my soul to God who gave it and bequeath my real and personal estate as follows, to wit: First I give and bequeath the house in which I now live and the ground belonging to it about fourteen acres to Sarah Baxter. I give and bequeath to Thomas my son three hundred dollars. And I give and bequeath to Samuel my son, four hundred dollars, and to my sons John and James and Moses M. and Marling each four hundred dollars. And I give and bequeath all my household goods and wearing apparel and two hundred and fifty dollars to Sarah Baxter. And I give the remainder of my effects to my sons Samuel and John and James and Moses M and Marling. I appoint as the executor of this my last will and testament Sarah X Oldham (her mark) Witness Thomas Oldham William X Garey (his mark) Isaac and Sarah are buried in the Old City Cemetery in Cambridge, Ohio. More land was added to the original 160 acres until the Oldham farm became one of the largest in this section. On it is Oldham grove where picnics used to be held annually. Marling Oldham built a large brick house near by. His son, Isaac J., married and went in the old stone house, and it was there he died in 1939, at the age of 82. The old stone house in 1942 was occupied by Isaac's daughter , Mrs. Clara E Mason, and her son Edgar O. Mason.

      Oldham's Narrow Escape

      One morning as Isaac was endeavoring to kindle the fire in his cabin, whil st upon his knees blowing the few remaining embers and Indian chief nam ed Doughty crept stealthily in upon him, caught him by the neck and rais ed his tomahawk ready to deal the fatal blow. After bolding Isaac in th at position for some time he released his hold and remarked, "Ingen let wh ite man go, white man no let Ingen go", and left the cabin. This occurr ed just before the War of 1812 and after the larger part of the Indians h ad removed further to the westward. It was always supposed that Doughty in tended to kill Isaac before he left, but feared of being caught befo re he could overtake the rest of the tribe, and that is what thought deter red him.

      The Sabbath Respected

      This incident in Isaac's career happened in 1806. Forty warriors and sever al squaws and children had a camp a little east of his cabin. Isaac nev er killed any game while the Indians remained his neighbors, but traded mi lk and vegetables for wild game with them. He thereby never incurred their displeasure. One Sunday morning while Isaac was reading aloud from the Scr iptures and Indian came with a quarter of venison, and after listening awh ile set his venison behind the door. When Isaac had finished the Indian sa id "You worship the Great Spirit above?" "Yes" said Isaac, "Every Seven th day we do no work but give the entire day to His worship." After that t he Indians never came on the Sabbath, nor ever fired a gun within his hearing on that day.

      Bibliography

      Guernsey County, Ohio 1825 tax List, Vertical file, Seattle Public Library , Seattle, King, Washington.

      International Genealogy Index, n.d., LDS Family History Center, Everett, Snohomish, Washington.

      Letter from Audra Wayne, 268 Willow Lane, Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 of the Wheeling Genealogical Society, August 10, 1991.

      letters from Mrs. Ada Evans

      Marriage record of Samuel Marling Oldham and Mary Sherrard, Guernsey County, Ohio, 27 January 1831.

      Obituary of Marling Oldham, March, 1894.

      Obituary of Samuel Marling Oldham (Cambridge, Ohio), Aug 7, 1890.

      Oldham Family Group Sheet sent to Marcia J Rothman by Darlene Libbey,

      Oldham Family Record, sent to Marcia Rothman by Lilly Moorehead of Cambridge, Ohio, ?.

      Pioneer Cemetery Of Guernsey County, Ohio, n.d., Seattle Public Library, Seattle, King, Washington.

      Record of Deaths Probate Court for Guernsey County, Ohio, 1870.

      Roots and Branches, "Root and Branches," is on individual detailed citations.

      Sarchet, Col. Cyrus P.B., History of Guernsey County Ohio, 1 (Indianapolis , Indiana: B.F. Bowen and Company, 1911).

      Sarchet, Col. Cyrus P.B., Portrait and Biographic Record of Guernsey Count y Ohio, 2 (Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana: B.F. Bowen and Company, 191 1).

      The Old Grave Yard in Cambridge Burial Records of Founders Cemetery Cambridge, Ohio, abt 1970.

      United States Federal Census.

      William G. Wolfe, Stories of Guernsey County, Ohio; History of an Average Ohio County (Cambridge, Ohio: William G. Wolfe, 1943).

      Williams, T.F., Home Guide and Instructor with Biographies; History of Guernsey County, Ohio (Cleveland, Ohio: T.F. Williams, 1882).



      Sat, 20 Jun 1998 05:01:18 -0400 From: Paul Willis To: joldham@indy.net

      Hi Jan,

      Thanks for your email. I have been wanting to find info regarding Marli ng Oldham's wife, Isabella Marling. My info reports that Marling Oldham a nd she are cousins. I also know that Marling Oldham's father, married Sar ah Marling. Both Sarah Marling and Isabella Marling were from Roney's Poin t, (Ohio County) W. Va. I'd like to find out some info concerning the fami ly relationship between Marling and his wife (cousin) Isabella.

      Where are you located? I'm guessing that you are located in Indiana and pe rhaps Indianapolis judging from your email address. I'm in Ohio, not too f ar from the Oldham family farm. I have a pic of the stone house that Iss ac Oldham built. This pic includes the additions that have been added to t he original house. The house still exists and is being lived in at the pre sent by Margaret Mason. Margaret married Edgar Oldham Mason whose mother w as Clara Ethel Oldham (granddaughter of Marling Oldham). As a boy, I w as in this house many times.

      FYI, Marling Oldham built a home on the family farm. Later, this house a nd land surrounding it were taken (purchased) over by the US Government f or a Army hospital. That hospital was called Fletcher Hospital. It was us ed during WWII by the Army to treat injuries and sicknesses of solders. Th ey even treated German POW's at this hospital. After the war, the State of Oh io took over the hospital and converted it into a mental hospital. It is s till used as a mental hospital although most if not all of the original ho spital buildings are torn down now. When the state of Ohio took it over, t hey changed the name from Fletcher Hospital to the Cambridge State Hospita l. The Marling Oldham home was a nice two story brick house. It has been t orn down in the past five years. Paul


      Isaac Oldham found in:
      Family Archive #255 Land Records: Alabama, Ark ansas, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan,
      Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin, 1790-1907
      Document number: 506 Description num ber: 1
      Number of acres: 80.0000 Accession n umber: OH0340__.506
      Patentee Surname: Oldham Patentee gi ven name: Isaac
      State name: Ohio
      Volume: 340 Page number: 506
      Land office: Zanesville Aliquot pa rt reference: WSE
      Section number: 15
      Township: 3 North Range: 3 We
      Meridian or special survey area: US Mili tary Survey
      Title transfer authority: Sale-Cash Entr ies
      Combined signature date: Mar. 10, 18
      Multiple patentees: N Multiple warra ntees: N
      Signature: Y Canceled document: N S ubsurface rights reserved: N
      Metes and bounds: N Fractional secti on: N
      Data Introduction

      32.
      Isaac Oldham found in:
      Family Archive #255 Land Records: Alabama, Ark ansas, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan,
      Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin, 1790-1907
      Document number: 1648 Description nu mber: 1
      Number of acres: 63.0000 Accession n umber: OH0370__.139
      Patentee Surname: Oldham Patentee gi ven name: Thomas
      State name: Ohio
      Volume: 370 Page number: 139
      Land office: Zanesville Aliquot pa rt reference: ENW
      Section number: 5
      Township: 2 North Range: 3 We
      Meridian or special survey area: US Mili tary Survey
      Title transfer authority: Sale-Cash Entr ies
      Combined signature date: May 20, 18
      Multiple patentees: Y Multiple warra ntees: N Comments: ISAAC OLDHAM

      Signature: Y Canceled document: N S ubsurface rights reserved: N
      Metes and bounds: N Fractional secti on: N

      ************************************************----- Original Message -----
      From: "Jesse McWhirter"
      To:
      Sent: Tuesday, August 02, 2005 10:16 AM
      Subject: [OLDHAM] Issac Oldham 1779 and Sarah Marling > Searching for information on the family of Isaac Oldham b. 1779 Westmore land Pa. Married Sarah Marling. > > Jesse McWhirter > Tennessee
      ************************ *


      ********

      Cambridge Jeffersonian (Cambridge, Ohio)
      10 Feb 1876

      GUERNSEY COUNTY IN THE WAR OF 1812.

      As a contrictuion to the centennial history of Guernsey county we have had pladed in our hands by Denison Tetrick, Esq., of Madison township, a fragment of an original master roll of a company of men who went from this county into the arm in the war of 1812. The roll will be of very great interest to all of our readers, particularly the older people and the descendents and relatives of the old soldiers who did such honorable service. The names of a number of the men have faded out of memory and it is well and fitting that they should be revived. The list contains many family names yet familiar in the county. The spelling of names is preserved as it occurs on the fragment of the roll, which is as follows:

      LIST

      James Frame.....................Michael Archer
      Amos Williams..................John Secrest
      Thomas Hide.....................James Dye
      William Smith...................Thomas Bay
      William McCulloch............James Bay
      Joshua Rebe.......................Samuel Bay
      Enoch Thomas....................William Bryan
      Patrick McLocklin...............James Oldham
      John Waller........................William Hosinch
      David Waller.....................John Hutchison
      Lewis Waller.....................John Marling
      John Barton.......................Isaac Oldham
      Adam Shriver....................James Delong
      Henry Baker......................Isaac Delong
      William Shepheard.........William Laws
      Jacob Smith.....................Enoch Phillips
      Timothy Sharock.............Aaron Hedges
      Everet Sharock...............Joseph Fuller
      Shandy Hammond...........David Hollis
      William Morehead........Gaoman Mathews
      William Cheny...............John Gibson
      James Morehead..........Adam Tedrick
      William Hudson...........John Philips
      John Bates.................Israel Hedges
      Samuel Hatters............Paul Dewit

      For some of these substitutes appeared as follows. For James Frame, Thomas Smith; for Wm. McCullock, James McMullin; for Enoch Thomas, Robert Seton; for Shandy Hammond, Joseph Deen; forMichael Archer, Joseph McMullin; for John Secrest, Samuel Linton; for James Dye, William Ashton; for Thomas Bay, Lewis Grindstaff; for Isaac Oldham, William Harper and for John Philips, John Lemmon.


      **********

      For(e)aker family of Guernsey County, Ohio

      Cambridge Township:
      Isaac Oldham cam to Cambridge Townshipin the summer of 1805. - born in1779, he moved to Virginia with his father. He married Sara Marling, went to Ohio in 1805. He cleared a patch of ground and built a cabin, and went back to Virginia in 1807 for hiswife. Land owners in 1840 included:
      John Marling, 160 acres - Sec. 21
      Samuel Odlham - 106 acres - Sec. 4 (he was over 76 years and living in 1876)
      Thomas Oldham - 302 acres - Sec 3, 4, and 8
      Isaac Oldham - 395 acres - Sec 3, 4, and 22
      Isaac Oldham (Heirs) - 96 acres - Sec 4.

      1850 Federal Census, Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio, USA
      Isaac Oldham 71
      Sarah Oldham 64
      James Nelson 16
      Samuel Nelson 13
    Person ID I12309  oldham
    Last Modified 14 Oct 2013 

    Father OLDHAM, Isaac Private,   b. Abt 1739, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1821, Cambridge, Ohio Co, Virginia Or Wheeling, West Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 82 years) 
    Mother ANDERSON, Sarah,   b. Abt 1750,   d. Aft 1821, Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 72 years) 
    Family ID F4355  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family MARLING, Sarah E.,   b. 1 Jun 1781, Lower Chanceford, York County, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 1869, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years) 
    Married 7 Feb 1806  Roney's Point, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, Rachel,   b. 11 Jan 1807, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Mar 1837, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 30 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Samuel Marling,   b. 20 Mar 1809, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Aug 1890, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     3. OLDHAM, John Marling,   b. 15 Oct 1810, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Apr 1890, Reynoldsburg, Franklin County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     4. OLDHAM, James,   b. 4 Jan 1813, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Mar 1873, Morea, Crawford County, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years)
     5. OLDHAM, Sarah Elizabeth,   b. 17 Apr 1815, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jul 1897, Afton, Union County, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
     6. OLDHAM, Dr. Moses Mcwhorter D. D. S.,   b. 27 Aug 1817, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Oct 1883, Springfield, Clark County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     7. OLDHAM, Marling,   b. 22 Aug 1819, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1894, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     8. OLDHAM, Thomas,   b. 1 Jan 1822, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Mar 1876, Bell County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     9. OLDHAM, Elizabeth,   b. 7 Sep 1825, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Sep 1863, Afton, Iowa Or Akron, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F5276  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 8 Nov 1779 - Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 7 Feb 1806 - Roney's Point, Ohio County, West Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Federal - 7 Aug 1820 - Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - W??SE Sec 15 Twp 3N Range 3W Meridian US Mililtary Survey OH (Near Kimbolton and Mount Herman) Near his brother Robert Oldham - 10 Mar 1825 - Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Sec 3, 4, and 22 - 395 acres - 1840 - Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Federal - 1850 - Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 3 Sep 1851 - Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Old City Cemetery, Cambridge, Guernsey County, Ohio, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Sources 
    1. [S1476] Marcia Rothman, mjrothman@comcast.net.

    2. [S135] For(e)aker family of Guernsey County, Ohio.

    3. [S1092] Home Guide & Instructor pg 458.