Oldham Family History

OLDHAM, Dr Samuel

Male 1798 - 1860  (62 years)


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  • Name OLDHAM, Samuel 
    Prefix Dr 
    Born 7 Jan 1798  King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Census 1840  Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1850  District 10. Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Census 1860  District 10. Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Died 15 Nov 1860  Eylau Farms, Lauderdale County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Notes 
    • Listed in his grandfather's will, 1829. He was a member of the vestry of Hanover Parish, King George County, Virginia

      James Diggs Dishman will (1813) Will Book 3, page 116.

      Established the Eylau Plantation in 1827, Lauderdale County, Tennessee. Family tradition; Dr. Samuel Oldham had all the English History of the family, but burned it, as he didn't think patriots should keep that type of thing.

      Virginia Reed show death as 15 Nov 1866.

      The Story of Eylau by Mrs. Joe Clay Davis:

      Eylau Plantation must have been more wilderness than Dr. Samuel Oldham expected 130 years ago, when he reached the land that he been granted him by a struggling Federal Government. He came from Virginia with his slaves, his wagons, his adi.

      Little of written history has been found on this old plantation and its early years, but they were busy days, for it was not until three years after Dr. Oldham arrived that he was able to build a house and other permanent structures. Theso sawed out the yellow poplar planks from the forest which stood on the doctor 's own land. The slaves would elevate a log onto a platform, and then one below and one above would saw out by hand the thousands of planks needed in the house.

      The house was Williamsburg Colonial, simple and with quiet dignity. The main part of the house was nearly square. One entered a hallway sixteen feet wide and encountered a Chippendale staircase to the second floor, where the house was diro rooms each twenty-two feet square, stood on each side of the wide hallways, on both the first and second floors. Each of the eight rooms in the main part of the house had a huge wood-burning fireplace.

      Kerosene burning lamps hung from the ceilings in copper hangers, some of the hangers having filigree work as delicate as lace. The main floor hallway led directly back to a screened summer dining porch which was a good 16 feet by 40 feet, and across this porch one entered the kitchen and the old servants quarters. This wing connected to the main house by the screened porch, had five rooms, a pantry, and back porch.

      In the yard by the side of the old house was the main office building, a five room cottage type of structure, which also was built in 1830. This cottage still stands, but the house was destroyed by fire on December 17, 1952. The old hanmoys and foundation were used by the present owners to brick veneer their new home.

      Years ago the Eylau Farms were famous for the dairy herds and for standard bred race horses. Eylau horses raced all over the nation. At that time Eylau had its own three-quarter mile training track surrounding the race barn, and among ftu were Brown Hal, Prince Hal, and Nutwood. The old race barn still stands, but the track is gone.

      At one time Eylau was famous for its rose gardens, having some 600 varieties of roses growing. Thousands of jonquil, tulip, and hyacinth bulbs were planted over the place.

      The estate has 700 acres of terraced land; land which was saved from erosion years before the government stepped in to encourage such wor k. Eylau Farms is an outstanding example of soil conversation work undertaken without the aid of eitrepect d the results of terracing, rotation, and cover crop plantings.

      But the farming operations have not ignored the natural beauty of the place. Fields and pastures were originally fenced by some thirty-seven miles of perfectly trimmed hedge, through which wire was woven. Much of it remains today. The honection sof the South as Bois d'Arc. It was set out by an English gardener, who was imported for the purpose, and while kept neatly trimmed reminded one of English country estates.

      In the year 1878, John T. Fargason, Sr., obtained the estate from the Oldhams. It remained in the Fargason family for sixty-four years.

      In 1945, Eylau Farms was again placed under new management. The Farm, which had been intact for more than a century, was to be broken up. Joe C. Davis, Jr., the new owner, planned to retain 1,000 acres surrounding the old house, and to__


      This move incidentally met with the approbation of neighbors living about the Eylau Farms, who felt that it would bring a number of resouceful, independent farms to the neighborhood and improve business.


      OLDHAM

      By Mrs. W. A. Alexander (Elizabeth Owen), a Descendant

      My mother, the late Mrs. John Owen of Brownsville, Tennessee, lived at Eylau the first ten years of her life and was baptized there by the first Bishop of Tennesse, the Right Revernd James Otey and, incidentally, this was his last official

      The President of these United States, James K. Polk, was one of the distinguished guests at Eylau, while serving in that office. And I might add here that President Andrew Johnson was a guest at the Ripley home of Dr. Robert H. Oldham as,
      a Partee Oldham.

      During the Civil War, when word came that the Yankee army was approaching the Eylau plantation, home of Dr. Samuel Oldham, all the beautiful silver bearing the family crest ( a dove with an olive branch in its mouth ), was carried to a pd slave. However, a field darkie upon being questioned confessed to the Yankee soldiers that he had seen where the silver was buried, there upon it was carried by an officer of the Federal Army to Rock Island, Illinois. In 1868, just three years later, Col. Algie Oldham was told by a friend that he had dined in the home of a lieutenant colonel in Rock Island, Illinois, that year and that he had recognized the silver service and other pieces and that he was dead sure, because of the family crest and other markings. Col. Oldham wrote to a brother Mason in that city to find out what he could about the lieutenant colonel and received in part the following reply: "Lieut. Col. of the city of Rock Island, Ill. (naming him ), formerly of the 126th Regiment Ill Vols., is not a Mason (and probably never will be.)" Col. Oldham wrote again telling him why he wished to know of his reputation in that vicinity and his brother Mason in turn replied that no one would dare insinuate that any possessions of said lieutenant colonel were gotten by foul means. One sentence I quote: "I think it will not be possible for me to find out if any of your silverware is in said (not naming him) possession." Hence, Col. Oldham allowed the matter to drop and the family silver remained in Yankeeland.

      The above story is taken from letters found in an old brass and leather trunk which was recently opened for the first time in over fifty years; in it were also receipts dated 1836-37. One was for the Washington globe dated 1836, the Browe trunk was owned by Col. Algie S. Oldham. The communications are now in the possession of my sister, Mrs. David H. Edington in Mobile, Alabama.

      Dr. Samuel Oldham had all the genealogy of his English ancestors stored carefully in his desk but one day after reading of the American way of life, being recognized for one's own merit or ability, instead of that reflected from one's ancsesk and withdrew all the papers and threw them in the fire. His wife wept and he promised to rewrite them for her but, alas, he never did.

      It should be mentioned here that Dr. Robert Honeyman Oldham, the son of Dr. Samuel Oldham, enlisted in the Army and was given a commission but had not been assiged to a division or company but voluntarily gave his services to the men in ts were trying to dam the river. Many were taken ill with fever and because of their immediate need, Dr. Oldham gave his services, contracted the fever, and died therefrom.

      It is noted upon some U.D.C. papers that Mrs. Robert H. Oldham (the former Laura Partee) smuggled food and clothing from Memphis to the men who were working in the river bottom. In so doing she risked her own life.

      Sue Oldham notes: "Lauderdale County from Earliest Times" and have "History of Tennessee -Lauderdale, Tipton, Haywood and Crockett Counties." Also, there is a new book out, actually it's in its second printing, called "Visions of Lauderdale County." It's a supplement to "Lauderdale County from Earliest Times." It's written by Clarice Hellums and her sister - very nice, actually really large - 427 pages 8 1/2 x 11, lots of photos. They did in depth articles on four plantations - Eylau (built by Dr. Samuel Oldham - Harrod's 2nd gr. grandfather) being one of them. The Oldham genealogy is incorrect in that they have Harrod's grandfather, Franklin Pierce Oldham, as having died with no issue. Cute, huh - there went 9 children and all their descendants. Other than that, very nice book.


      Godspeed: Among the early settlers of Lauderdale County were Dr. Samuel and Cornelia C. (Honyman) Oldham; her father, Dr. Robt. Honyman, was a noted physician and member of the royal navy, for many years surgeon of the "Portland ," a ship of the line, that was sent to St. Helena in 1771, to await Capt. Cook's expected arrival from his first trip around the world, and convey his ship to England. He was also a direct descendant of the Dr. Honyman, who extracted by command, the fifth rib from the side of James V, King of Scotland, which rib was transmitted to him by his ancestors, and he by will to his only son, with the request, "that he will carefully keep the said rib, and carefully transmit it to his descendants." Mr. and Mrs. Oldham were born and raised in Virginia; he was a graduate of the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, and one of the noted physicians of his State; they moved to Lauderdale County in 1838, and he died in 1860, and left three sons, none now living. Robert H., the second son, was also a physician and succeeded to his father's practice; he was a graduate of the literary department of the University of Virginia, and of the Jefferson Medical College, and for sixteen years practiced in Lauderdale County, standing at the head of his profession. In 1850 he married Laura E. Partee, who was born in 1835; one son and one daughter of this marriage are living; both parents were members of the Protestant Episcopal Church. While Dr. Oldham took an active interest in politics, being a Democrat, he did not care for any official position. He died in 1862, lamented by all; his wife is still living with her daughter in Brownsville, Tenn. The son, Robert H., was born January 10, 1856, in Lauderdale County, and had fine educational advantages; he attended successively the colleges at Lebanon, Andrew College in Gibson County; Bethel College at Russellville, Ky.; the University of the South at Sewanee, and the college, at Georgetown, D. C., becoming a thorough classical scholar. In 1877 he married Lucy A. Palmer, who was born in 1856, a cultured and beautiful woman. They have four children: Frances C., Sue P ., Palmer and Alice. Mr. Oldham is not a church member; Mrs. Oldham is a Methodist. In politics he is a Democrat; he gives his time to farming and the insurance business, and for three years has been a salesman for H. D. Glass & Co. He is an enterprising and popular young man

      ***************
      OLDHAM FAMILY CEMETERY, Haywood County, Tennessee http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnhaywoo/cemetery/oldham.htm

      Surname Given Name Birth Date Death Date Comment
      Oldham Oldham Dr. Samuel 7 Jan 1798 15 Nov 1860 Oldham Family Members
      Oldham Mrs. Samuel

      **********

      of Tennessee From the Earliest Times to the Present: Together with an Historical Sketch of Gibson, Orion, Dyer, Weakley and Lake County Besides a Valuable Fund of Notes, Reminiscences, Observations, etc.etc."
      Goodspeed Publishing 1887
      Crockett Co. Memorial Library, Alamo, TN
      ----------------------------------------
      Dr. Samuel Oldham received his academic training at the University of Virginia and his medical training at the Jefferson Medical College in Pennsylvania. He received further professional training in his association with his father-in-law, Dr. Robert Honyman in Hanover County, Virginia. In about the year 1827 he and his wife traveled west, settling in Lauderdale County, Tennessee, where Dr. Oldham bought much acreage from Columbia University and built upon his estate the beautiful Williamsburg Colonial mansion called "Eylau." Before his death this acreage was increased to 10,000 acres.

      The home was built entirely by his slaves and was completed in 1835. It was located eight miles east of Ripley, Tennessee. The main part of the house was square, or nearly so. On entering a hallway sixteen feet wide, one encountered a Chippendale staircase to the second floor, where the house was divided by another sixteen foot hallway. Two rooms, each twenty-two feet square, stood on each side of the wide hallways on both the first and second floors. Each of the eight rooms in the main part of the house had a huge wood-burning fireplace, and they were the only means of heating the place. Elaborate kerosene burning lamps hung from the ceilings, all made of copper, having filigree work as delicate as lace. The wallpaper on the lower floor was an imported satin damask Paper mache. The draperies were also imported and today they grace the windows of the granddaughter of Dr. Robert H. Oldham and his wife, Laura Partee. The draperies are a heavy satin damask in an old rose shade and it is indeed remarkable that they should have lasted for more than a century. A very handsome secretary used by Dr. Samuel Oldham is in the home of Mrs. John H. Owen. While the furnishings were mostly colonial and in keeping with the spaciousness of the home, there were many period pieces and many objets d'art collected by Colonel Algernon Oldham, who traveled extensively in European countries. A beautiful alabaster clock in the shape of a cathedral is in the home of Cornelia Owen Edington in Mobile.

      It is not surprising that Dr. and Mrs. Oldham entertained upon a lavish scale, frequently converting the lower floor into a ballroom to accommodate guests arriving from Memphis and other towns thereabout.
      Comfortable quarters were provided for the slaves who always received the kindest treatment from Dr. Oldham and his family. There were several large barns and many tenant houses as well as three homes for the managers. The cotton gin stands in the old gin house which has housed Eylau gins for more than 100 years.

      Dr. Oldham died November 15, 1860 and was buried in the family "burying ground" at Eylau with this inscription carved on his tombstone, which, incidentally, looks like a miniature Washington monument:

      "Here rests the remains of Dr. Samuel Oldham, formerly of King George County, Virginia, but late of Lauderdale County, Tennessee. Born 7th Jan. 1793, died 15th Nov. 1860. Near him are buried his mother, his wife and some of his children, grandchildren and a few friends."

      According to Goodspeed"s "History of Tennessee" (1887), the Episcopal Church, erected in 1858, was of frame and cost $1,500. It was standing in 1887 upon a lot donated by Dr. Samuel Oldham.

      On the same page in Goodspeed is the following: "Missionary Baptist Church erected in 1859 and still stands (1887) and in use, is of frame and cost $1,500; lot donated by Hiram Partee."

      It is told in the family that Dr. Samuel Oldham and his wife were about to take a trip, and he hurriedly wrote his will. This was recently found in an old family trunk:

      "1850 September 10th. About to enter on a long travel with my dear wife, I make and ordain this my last will. I give to my wife, Mrs. Cornelia C. Oldham, during her natural lifetime the estate on which we reside known as Eylau, including everything and every description of property both real and personal on the said estate. I include everything, all monies and debts due to me after paying off such claims as may be due or owing by me at the time of my decease on said estate. I simply require of her that she have the said farm and buildings kept in the order in which I leave them. We understand each other, that she shall invite our son, Algernon Sidney Oldham, to reside with her together with his lady and that she will give him one half of the net proceeds of the said Farm annually for his attention of it.
      I give to my dear wife to dispose of at her death the silver service, which at this time is a part of the furniture of the Home as she may think proper, and if she may so desire.
      I hope that I am understood in this provision of my dear wife: It being my desire and intention to provide amply for her comfort. I therefore repeat that by the designation of the farm on which we reside at this time and everything thereon, I mean all the slaves, stock of horses, mules, cattle, sheep and hogs together with every other description of property I may have on it.

      I give to son, Mr. Algernon S. Oldham, in trust for the widow of my late son, Mr. James Oldham, and my grandsons, Edward Randle Oldham, Sidney Oldham and James Oldham, my estate of Plan Del Rio, the same being the estate on which my son, the late Mr. James Oldham, resided at his death, together with my slaves on said estate and stocks of every description and kind to be administered by him after the following manner for the benefit of his brother's family.
      Viz: - That he shall annually give to his sister Helen, during her widowhood and no longer, one fourth, or a child's part of the net proceeds of the said estate.

      The remaining fourth, that's three fourths of the net proceeds of said estate, he will use for the nurture and education of the said Edward Randle, Sidney and James Oldham as their necessities in his judgment may require. This trust to close when the youngest child shall attain to twenty-one years of age, when he will cause as equal a division as he can make of the estate amongst the said children of his brother, the late Mr. James Oldham, to whom I give their several parts in fee simple excepting that the said children shall secure to their mother if she is then the widow of their father. Which provision of one sixth (fourth) of the annual net proceeds of said estate, she shall continue to enjoy during her widowhood but no longer. The Trust to close on the happening of the occasion for the second time hereafter named.

      I give in trust to my son, Mr. Sam'l. Oldham, for his own support and for the nurture and education of his children the estate on which he resides known as Frog Jump, together with all the slaves, stock or horses, mules, and all other farm stock, household articles and all other property which I have sent to said farm requiring him to make something like equitable division of said property amongst his children at his death. I moreover give him the right at any time to dispose of any part of or the whole of said estate on conditions that the proceeds of such sale or sales are re-invested and made subject to the above limitations.
      I give to my son, Dr. Robt. H. Oldham, the tract of land being in Dyer County, State of Tennessee, which I own lying between the Chestnut Bluff, the same being my portion of a tract of land purchased by myself and Rev. Mr. Thomas Owen of John C. McLemore and others which said tract has heretofore divided between the Sr. Rev. Mr. Thomas Owen and myself. The river side portions of which tract was assigned to me. Also I give to my said son, Doctor Robert H. Oldham, a tract of two hundred acres lying immediately on the opposite side of the river in Lauderdale County, Tennessee (on the south side the first named tract being on the north side of the river) purchased of Daniel Tisdale, Gen. Wm. Connor being his agent and attorney the agent of William H. Loving, who was the attorney of Dave Tisdale, and I hereby confirm to my son, Doctor Robert H. Oldham all advances of property and money heretofore made to him.

      Until the future of this life shall give my son, Mr. Algernon S. Oldham, my estate of Eylau as hereafter provided, I give in possession and use to him the Trust of Forrest Home now under his management, together with the slaves thereon and stocks of every kind with all other plantation appendages. Their holding to terminate as soon as he gets possession of the estate known as Eylau.

      When in the order of Times it shall please Almighty God to remove from the world both my dear Wife and myself, Then I give to my son, Mr. Algernon S. Oldham, the Estate of Eylau; purchased of various persons with occupants attached containing something over three thousand acres of lands; but inasmuch as this tract contains more land than any of his brothers have, I require him to pay to his Brother Samuel Oldham the sum of three thousand dollars, one thousand annually, the first installment to fall on the first of January after the death of my wife, Mrs. Cornelia C. Oldham, interest to occur on this debt only as the installments become due and to his brother Doctor Robert H. Oldham, the sum of five thousand dollars, one thousand dollars annually until the debt is discharged, no interest to be charged except on installment when not paid as they become due. I also on the above named contingency give to my son, Mr. Algernon Sidney Oldham, forty slaves to be taken by him in families, that is father, mother, children and if he wishes to have George Young from the Forrest Home plantation he and his family are to be counted as part of the forty slaves herein bequested to him. The last spring I gave to my son, Algernon S. Oldham and his lady, a negro boy named Peter for a body servant. I hereby confine the said gift to them and direct that the boy Peter shall not be counted as one of the forty slaves herein before bequested to him. Whatever crop is on the farm when it falls to him I direct shall go with the said farm to him. I give to my said son, Algernon S. Oldham, whenever the said farm comes into his possession as heretofore pointed, eighteen of the average mules, or horses which may be on the said estate and two-thirds of the cattle, sheep and hogs. I give to him all the furniture in the Mansion house including my books and bookcases which I hope he will ever keep open to his brothers and sisters, nephews and nieces. I give to him as above all the machines and machinery of every kind on the farm.

      When the day arrives, as arrive it surely will, that my dear wife and myself have passed away, then I give to my son, Mr. Algernon Sidney Oldham in trust for my grandson, Edward Randle Oldham, the Forrest Home plantation together with all my slaves, with the exception heretofore made toward George Young and family and Peter, thereon stock of mules, cattle and hogs, also twelve average slaves from the Eylau Estate which my said son will settle together with the slaves left as aforesaid on said plantation on the said Forrest Home plantation when he withdraws his own slaves. I request to my son, Mr. Algernon S. Oldham, that he will put my grandson, Edward Randle Oldham, on the said estate, giving him at first a good manager that he may learn to manage for himself.

      The annual net proceeds of the estate he will after appropriating on sixth (fourth) to Mrs. Helen Oldham, widow of my deceased son, James, as long as she is his widow, and my son, if she marry again and is left a widow a second time and needs it, renew to her as I have heretofore directed the fourth part of the net proceeds of the said estate or requires Edward to do so. Whenever this trust begins I require a total relinquishment of all the legal interest which he may have the estate of his father to use that I may make provision in favor of his brother Sidney; money if there be any excepted.

      Again I give to my son Algernon S. Oldham in trust for the benefit of my grandson James Oldham my estate Plan del Rio, the same being the late residence of my deceased son the late Mr. James Oldham, together with sixteen (average of the slaves on the said farm) one-half of the number of mules and horses and stock of every kind. Which said estate I direct that the trustee shall hold in the same way as directed in the trust for the benefit of Edward Randle Oldham or his mother, Mrs. Helen C. Oldham. In consideration of provision I require of my grandson, James, that he shall relinquish all interest which he may have in his father's estate (to me that I may make provision) to Mr. Algernon Oldham in trust, in favor of his brother Sidney to except any little money there may be to his share - that he make the necessary apportionment.

      The provision herein made given to the whole of their father's land and slaves to my grandson Sidney except the down interest in his claim. Am contemplating the purchase of the Dave Tisdale, two-thirds of which lands and slaves being mine by fair purchase from my grandsons Edward and James. I give the whole land and negroes as far as they are mine to Mr. Algernon S. OIdham in trust for the benefit of my grandson Sidney Oldham. I also give him and in like manner for the benefit of said all the remainder of my slaves on the Plan Del Rio Estate, horses, mules, and stock of every description and kind. All of which I require the said trustees to hold and administer as set forth in this trust in favor of Edward Randle Oldham, I have heretofore given to my little grandsons a horse and colt each and I hereby confirm to them the same. I give to my grandson, Edward R. Oldham, my tool chest with the tools belonging to it. He can have that whenever my time on earth comes to a close.
      To my son Algernon - Get the Poor children back to their father's blood if you find them slightly estranged when I leave you.

      The remainder of the slaves on the Eylau estate I direct shall be divided as equally as they can be between my son Sam'l Oldham and Robert H. Oldham and if my old servants, Jim and Bet survive each of us (myself and wife) I will and direct that they on the survivor shall be taken care of by my son Algernon S. Oldham - Permit them, my son, to retain the house in which you will find them and see that they have wood in cold weather. But I know that neither of you nor my daughter Fanny will allow them to be neglected.
      My lot in the town of Ripley, you may sell, my children, and apply the proceeds towards the completion of the Church which you will be laboring to construct in the town of Ripley.

      I have not access to a lawyer at this time to know how. The reasons bequests contained herein without witnesses to my seal and signature may be sufficient to convey the property herein named and intended to be conveyed but inasmuch as the whole is in my handwriting and that each page, I suppose that it will convey to my children and grandchildren the property hereby intended to be conveyed both real and person and now I again sign and seal before closing the instrument.

      "Signed SAM'L. OLDHAM
      "SEAL"

      " LAUDERDALE COUNTY from Earliest Times" Written by Descendents of Its Pioneer Citizens, edited by Kate Johnston Peters, Ripley, TN 1957.
      Crockett Co. Memorial Library, Alamo, TN
      --------------------------------------
      Also from this same book on page 176:
      To the east of Curve lies the Eylau farm. It was never a part of Curve but has played a part in the history of Curve. We say this because many days local citizens stood on the platform of the Curve railroad station and watched the local accommodation roll to a stop and the city folk alight. These people were often the various owners of the show place, Eylau, and they would be met at the station by a negro driver in a two-seated surrey with the fringe on the top. They would then be driven away in a cloud of dust to the manor house.
      ------------------------------------------
      From a book about "Century Farms"
      FROG JUMP FARM
      1986 Owner: Emmett Garfield Parker, Jr.
      Halls
      Located in the 10th District of Crockett County, Frog Jump Farm dates to 1830.
      (Supposedly it is called Frog Jump because at that point the body of water is so narrow a frog could jump over)
      Its founder was Dr. Samuel Oldham, Sr., a native of Virginia, who was one of the most influential plantation owners in West Tennessee. Frog Jump Farm initially had 1,500 acres largely devoted to cotton cultivation, but the property also produced all the "food and necessities of a large establishment." Oldham, who owned land in neighboring Haywood County, was a successful local doctor and planter. He married Cornelia Honeyman and they sent each of their sons to the University of Virginia for their college education.
      Dr. Oldham died in 1860 and the property passes into the hands of his son Samuel Oldham, Jr. (continued in notes of Samuel Oldham, Jr.)
      --------------------------------------------
      Immanuel Episcopal Church, Ripley came into being due largely to the vision, interest, persistence, and generosity of Dr. Sam Oldham. Records reveal that in 1841 Dr. Oldham was a delegate from Zion Episcopal Church, Brownsville to the Diocesan Convention held in Columbia.
      In 1843 Dr. Oldham secured the service of a Rev. Mr. Jenson, for whom he provided room and board, to hold occasional services at Elyau Plantation, the estate of Dr. Oldham. During 1847 Bishop Otey, first Bishop of Tennessee (1834-1863), came to Durhamville to hold morning prayer and preach at the home of Widow Lee. The Bishop discussed the fact that the liturgy was seldom heard in Ripley due to the absence of clergy. He felt that there were several intelligent members of the church in Ripley and vicinity who needed only the labors of a faithful clergyman to concentrate their interests and combine their efforts to organize a congregation and, in due time, build a church. In 1859 Dr. Oldham transferred a 180' by 315' lot adjoining the city limits of Ripley to the Protestant Episcopal Church of the Diocese of Tennessee. The deed was recorded in the Lauderdale County Court House.
      By 1859 a wood frame church building, which sat on the site of the present church, was started. Dr. Oldham contributed $1500 for the construction of the building.

      "History of Immanuel Episcopal Church, Ripley 1859-1996" by Frances Winslow, Ripley, TN .
      ----------------------------------------------
      "Know all men by these presents that I Sam'l. Oldham of the County of Haywood in the state of Tennessee do hereby convey to the Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Tennessee and their successors the following tract or parcel of Land, to wit situated in the state of Tennessee Lauderdale County Civil district No 2 adjoining the town of Ripley containing by estimation four and one half acres and bounded as follows Beginning at a Hickory in Joseph Wardlaws boundary line the Southwest corner of the town of Ripley thence East with the South boundary line of said town thirty five poles to the Northwest corner of G.P. Egglestons lot purchased by him of (indecipherable) thence South twenty poles; Thence west thirty five poles; Thence North twenty poles to the beginning to hold the same in trust for the use of the Wardens vestry and congregation of to establish a parish and build a Church thereon according to the rules and doctrines of the Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States and I covenant that I am (?) and (?) of said land and have a right to convey it and that I will forever defend the title to the same from the claims of all and any person or persons claiming (?) or under (?). In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this the fifth day of September one thousand eight hundred and fifty nine.
      Sam'l Oldham (seal)
      State of Tennessee
      Lauderdale County personally appeared before me J.O. C. Manley, Clerk of the County Court of said County Samuel Oldham the within named (?) with whom I am personally acquainted and who acknowledged that he executed the foregoing deed for the purposes therein contained. Witness my hand at office this 9th day of September 1859
      J.O.C. Manley Clerk
      Presented to me for registration this 9th day of September, 1859 at 9 oclock a.m.
      Ben G. Lackey Regent

      Lauderdale Co. TN deed book H page 337.
      ------------------------------------------------


      Father: Edward OLDHAM
      Mother: Sarah DISHMAN b: 1764 in King George County, VA

      Marriage 1 Cornelia HONYMAN b: 1793 in Louisa Co., Virginia
      Married: 1816 in Virginia 7
      Children
      James OLDHAM b: 1818 in King George Co, VA
      Samuel OLDHAM b: 8 JAN 1821 in King George County, VA
      Robert Honyman OLDHAM b: 1824 in King George County, VA
      Algernon Sidney OLDHAM b: 1825 in King George County, VA

      Sources:

      Title: deed Sarah THORNTON 01 Dec 1829 King George Co VA DB 13
      Note: Sarah Thornton states Samuel and Edward Oldham are her sons by her former marriage to Edward Oldham
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: King George Co. VA Circuit Court
      Media: Official Document
      Page: 102
      Text: Sarah THORNTON states Edward and Samuel are her sons by her former marriage with Edward OLDHAM
      Title: appraisal & sale of estate of Edward Oldham, deceased, King George Co., VA 07 July 1796
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Title: Kate Johnston Peters, 1957 "Lauderdale County From Earliest Times"
      Author: edited by Kate Johnston Peters
      Publication: 1957 Sugar Hill Lauderdale County Library, Ripley, Tennessee
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: Sugar Hill Lauderdale County Library, Ripley, Tennessee
      Media: Book
      Title: King George Co., VA Circuit Court inventory Apr 1795
      Author: King George Co. VA Circuit Court
      Note: copy of original inventory of estate of Edward Oldham, deceased furnished by King George Co. Circuit Court 14 Nov 1997
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: King George Co. VA Circuit Court
      Media: Official Document
      Title: tombstone
      Author: sons had tombstone carved in New Orleans and brought upriver
      Note: Tombstone is located inside fenced in area off dirt road passing beside house off of Curve Woodville Rd. currently standing on site of original Eylau plantation house. It is in the shape of the Washington Monument and has a plaque bearing the biographical information regarding Dr. Samuel Oldham and listing those who had been buried there also.
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: Eylau Farms, Lauderdale Co., TN
      Media: Tombstone
      Text: "Here rest the remains of Dr. Samuel Oldham formerly of King George Co., Virginia but late of Haywood Co., Tennessee. Born 7th Jan'y. 1793 Died 15th Nov'r. 1860. Near him are buried his mother, his wife and some of his children, grandchildren and a few friends."
      Note: sons had tombstone carved in New Orleans and brought upriver
      Title: tombstone
      Author: sons had tombstone carved in New Orleans and brought upriver
      Note: Tombstone is located inside fenced in area off dirt road passing beside house off of Curve Woodville Rd. currently standing on site of original Eylau plantation house. It is in the shape of the Washington Monument and has a plaque bearing the biographical information regarding Dr. Samuel Oldham and listing those who had been buried there also.
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: Eylau Farms, Lauderdale Co., TN
      Media: Tombstone
      Text: "Here rest the remains of Dr. Samuel Oldham formerly of King George Co., Virginia, but late of Haywood Co., Tennessee. Born 7th Jan'y, 1793 died 15th Nov'r.1860.
      Near him are buried his mother, his wife and some of his children, grandchildren and a few friends."
      Title: written testament of Emmett G. Parker, Sr., gr. grandson of Dr. Samuel Oldham
      Author: Emmett Garfield Parker, Sr.
      Note: Emmett Garfield Parker, Sr. was the son of Cornelia Virginia Oldham and James Brown (Squire) Parker. Cornelia was the daughter of Virgilia Sophia Anderson and Samuel Oldham, the son of Dr. Samuel Oldham
      Note: good
      Repository:
      Note: J. S. Duvall, Jackson, Tennessee
      Media: Letter
      Text: "He married in 1816 his only wife Cornelia C. Honeyman, Hanover Co., VA"
      Note: written testament of Emmett G. Parker, Sr., gr. grandson of Dr. Samuel Oldham.

      1840 United States Federal Census Haywood, Tennessee
      Name: Saml Aldhorn
      [Saml Oldham]
      [Saml Oldhorn]
      Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2
      Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1
      Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
      Slaves - Males - Under 10: 16
      Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 22
      Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 12
      Slaves - Males - 36 thru 54: 1
      Slaves - Males - 55 thru 99: 2
      Slaves - Females - Under 10: 10
      Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 15
      Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 9
      Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 3
      Slaves - Females - 55 thru 99: 1
      Persons Employed in Agriculture: 50
      Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 6
      Free White Persons - Under 20: 2
      Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
      Total Free White Persons: 4
      Total Slaves: 91
      Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 95

      1850 Federal Census, District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee, USA
      Saml Oldham 57
      Cornelia C. Oldham 57
      Af Oldham 25
      Miles Taylor 57

      1860 Federal Census. District 10. Haywood County, Tennessee, USA
      Saml Oldham 67
      Cornelia C Oldham 67
      Miles Taylor 68


    Person ID I10765  oldham
    Last Modified 10 Aug 2014 

    Father OLDHAM, Edward,   b. Abt 1766, Greenbriar County, West Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1796, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 30 years) 
    Mother DISHMAN, Sarah,   b. Abt 1764, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1835, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 71 years) 
    Family ID F1424  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family HONYMAN, Cornelia C.,   b. 1793, Hanover County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1868, Hot Springs, Garland County, Arkansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Married 1816  Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Children 
     1. OLDHAM, James,   b. 1818, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1859, Durhamville, Lauderdale, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years)
     2. OLDHAM, Samuel,   b. 8 Jan 1821, King George, Louisa, Or Hanover County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1861, Frog Jump Plantation, Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)
     3. OLDHAM, Robert Honeyman,   b. 1824, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1862, Brownsville, Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
     4. OLDHAM, Algernon Sidney,   b. 1825, King George County, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1880, Ripley, Lauderdale County, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years)
    Last Modified 29 Nov 2013 
    Family ID F4874  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 7 Jan 1798 - King George County, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1816 - Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - 1840 - Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Federal - 1850 - District 10. Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsCensus - Federal - 1860 - District 10. Haywood County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 15 Nov 1860 - Eylau Farms, Lauderdale County, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    Nelson, Louis N.
    Nelson, Louis N.
    Civil War Veteran

  • Sources 
    1. [S57] LDS.

    2. [S2610] 1850 Federal Census, District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee, household 366/366 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S271] 1860 Federal Census, District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee, Page 200, household 1479/1340 (Reliability: 3).

    4. [S3088] Sue Oldham Craig.